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American Dirt (Oprah's Book Club): A Novel…
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American Dirt (Oprah's Book Club): A Novel (edição: 2020)

de Jeanine Cummins (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1,9721256,399 (4.12)129
Lydia Quixano Perez lives in the Mexican city of Acapulco. She runs a bookstore. She has a son, Luca, the love of her life, and a wonderful husband who is a journalist. And while cracks are beginning to show in Acapulco because of the drug cartels, her life is, by and large, reasonably comfortable. Even though she knows they'll never sell, Lydia stocks some of her all-time favorite books in her store. And then one day a man enters the shop to browse and comes up to the register with four books he would like to buy, two of them her favorites. Javier is erudite. He is charming. And, unbeknownst to Lydia, he is the jefe of the newest drug cartel that has gruesomely taken over the city. When Lydia's husband's tell-all profile of Javier is published, none of their lives will ever be the same. Forced to flee, Lydia and eight-year-old Luca soon find themselves miles and worlds away from their comfortable middle-class existence.… (mais)
Membro:BrookeWilliams
Título:American Dirt (Oprah's Book Club): A Novel
Autores:Jeanine Cummins (Autor)
Informação:Flatiron Books (2020), Edition: 1st, 400 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Detalhes da Obra

American Dirt de Jeanine Cummins

  1. 00
    The Beast: Riding the Rails and Dodging Narcos on the Migrant Trail de Oscar Martínez (aspirit)
    aspirit: Called "magnificent" by Cummins in an interview. Describes migrant experiences through Mexico from Central American to the USA, by a journalist who traveled with them.
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Inglês (120)  Alemão (2)  Francês (1)  Todos os idiomas (123)
Mostrando 1-5 de 123 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Compelling and brilliant! ( )
  Faradaydon | Oct 11, 2021 |
American Dirt by Jeanine Cummins
Listened to this book from BARD and the narrator has a Spanish accent so it really makes it feel like I'm there. Descriptions are very precise in detail, some scenes I forget as they are a bit gory.
Story starts out when the mother and child are hiding in the bathroom. The shooters have invaded the house after shooting everybody outside for a family gathering.
Terrifying moments as one uses the bathroom in the same room they are in. After notifying the police she knows they must leave and seek shelter to keep safe.
The family get together of 15 and only her and her young son have survived.
Story then goes back to when she ran the bookstore with her husband. Times when they had to pay the cartel to keep their store from being broken into and things stolen.
Cartel visit other stores more often for more money. On the run I like how she is more alert to her surroundings and who is nearby. Love what she does with her ring and jewelry.
Child is scared and he is somewhat a genius with facts about things he's read. He knew the CO rivers and she hopes they make it there as she has an uncle there.
The package arrives with their food at the hotel and she is so terrified when she reads it. Haunting glimpse of her past.
She feels a bit safe but knows it's only for a few seconds as cars pass the bus and there are roadblocks.
Her son, Luca naps while she is still planning what to do next, especially if they have to escape a roadblock when the bus is stopped. She knows the cartel will be watching for them.
They are heading north and she hopes it is the right choice. Scenery along the way: colorful houses that resemble lego's, cute remark from Luca.
She knows of a person she could contact in the area. She's smart about her SIM card.
Lydia is able to track her spouse's friend on Facebook and finds a church the friend is a member of. She knows what and where the tattoo is and to watch out for it.
She knows they are still after her. Lying on the top of the train as it goes very fast might not be the perfect option to stay undetected.
Story keeps going back and then to present days. You are able to collect pieces of the things you want to know about, like a puzzle piece.
They can't buy certain tickets without a birth certificate for Luca...
They will be joining migrate workers in the journey north... Lydia's spouse was a journalist and he liked the strong bylines and stories he had to write about the murders.
The nuns after walking for 7 miles will keep them safe a night and with food. She gave up a lot of personal information even though she did not have to, never their destination. I'm really scared for her now.
She feels at ease with the other mothers as the young children sit at a table nearby.
Some women talk of the teen girl that was almost taken the night before. The man was in the cartel she's trying to avoid.
Love where and why she hides her money, so smart. Long struggles to get from one location to another. Unimaginable terror when boarding the train.
They are so close but then they are caught...horrid and horrific scenes as others are tortured and killed in front of their eyes. The other girls they were traveling with had made a call to their father but they get bad news there.
The attackers are not so easy on the girls...
'another day, another horror' is what they all go through, some worse than others.
I have read about the coyotes who will aid them from Mexico through the desert to the US. Never thought who was really responsible for the family deaths til she discovers who was behind it all.
Love the epilogue and about the author and why she wrote this book, mind blowing, emotional, numb should not be this difficult.
Love how the hoops and ring are her lifesavers and she needs to touch them when in danger and when in doubt as to their choices.
Strong, smart, brave, will do anything for their passage to US.
Thing I don't like are Spanish words and sayings as the story goes along that are not always translated into English.
Gets a 5 because i learned new words, travel, adventure, action, love, women were strong, brave and smart and mysteries.
I received this book from National Library Service for my BARD (Braille Audio Reading Device). ( )
  jbarr5 | Oct 8, 2021 |
American Dirt is a thrilling story of Lydia and her son Luca who survive a massacre at a party in Acapulco, and who make their way north to the US with other migrants. The book gives a real life picture of the intense pain, discomfort and psychological trauma that migrants experience crossing the border illegally. The reader can't help but become attached to the mother and son (as well as other migrants they meet along the way) and roots for their survival every bit of the way. ( )
  KatherineGregg | Oct 6, 2021 |
A story of migration from Mexico and Central America triggered by violence and retribution of gangs and drug cartels. The primary story was about Lydia and her son Luca fleeing after their whole family was murdered at a Quinceañera because of an article her journalist husband wrote. There are several other migration stories included in the narrative.

It was a compelling book to read, though I would not recommend for bedtime reading. ( )
  tangledthread | Oct 2, 2021 |
I loved American Dirt when I read it several months ago, but I did not reread it for this discussion so the details are a bit hazy. I also didn't know about the controversy surrounding the book when I read it.

Perhaps the author is guilty of cultural appropriation, but she certainly told the story in a way that made the plight and the tribulations of these migrants very real to me. I feared for them, cried with them, and cheered them on through their entire ordeal. The fact that the primary character, Lydia, and her son were middle-class and innocent perhaps was designed to make average Americans like me more able to identify with them.

Another criticism of the author that I've read is that she portrayed Mexicans as taking advantage of and preying on the migrants, but the Americans in her book weren't much better in their treatment of migrants. "There were good people on both sides" to quote someone whom I would not usually consider quotable.

Some liked the book, others did not. We all agreed we would love to know how they reached Maryland. They were here illegally, the little boy could not participate in the Geography contest for that reason. One thing that I had never thought about was the Crime Boss killed this woman's husband and family because he wanted her for himself. That had never entered my mind. Dodie is a Conservative, complained about the immigrants who are paid in cash and don't pay taxes, It was a very good discussion. I had read it shortly after it came out because I had bought into all the raves it had received -- until it hadn't -- but had no desire to read it again. We agreed that Lydia could be a woman like ourselves, middle-class and educated. She definitely did not portray the typical Mexican immigrant. ( )
  NMBookClub | Sep 18, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 123 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
I am an immigrant. My family fled El Salvador with death pounding on our door. The terror, the loss, the injustice of this experience shaped everything about me. I see no part of myself reflected in American Dirt, a book white critics are hailing as the great immigrant novel.
 
Let me be clear: because American Dirt contains multiple inaccuracies and distortions, the White US readership in particular will come away with a stylized understanding of the issues from a melodramatic bit of literary pulp that frankly appears to have been drafted with their tastes in mind (rather than the authentic voices of Mexicanas and Chicanas).

Ah, and there’s the rub. White folks and other non-Mexican Americans in the US: you CANNOT judge for yourselves whether American Dirt is authentic. You’re going to have to trust Mexicans and Chicanx folks. I know that runs counter to the upbringing of so many. I know it defies our national discourse.

Pero ni modo. That’s too bad.
adicionado por kidzdoc | editarMedium, David Bowles (Jan 18, 2020)
 
Cummins has put in the research, as she describes in her afterword, and the scenes on La Bestia are vividly conjured. Still, the book feels conspicuously like the work of an outsider. The writer has a strange, excited fascination in commenting on gradients of brown skin: Characters are “berry-brown” or “tan as childhood” (no, I don’t know what that means either). In one scene, the sisters embrace and console each other: “Rebeca breathes deeply into Soledad’s neck, and her tears wet the soft brown curve of her sister’s skin.” In all my years of hugging my own sister, I don’t think I’ve ever thought, “Here I am, hugging your brown neck.” Am I missing out?

The real failures of the book, however, have little to do with the writer’s identity and everything to do with her abilities as a novelist.

What thin creations these characters are — and how distorted they are by the stilted prose and characterizations. The heroes grow only more heroic, the villains more villainous. The children sound like tiny prophets. Occasionally there’s a flare of deeper, more subtle characterization, the way Luca, for example, experiences “an uncomfortable feeling of both thrill and dread” when he finally lays eyes on the other side of the border, or how, in the middle of the terror of escape, Lydia will still notice that her son needs a haircut.

But does the book’s shallowness paradoxically explain the excitement surrounding it? The tortured sentences aside, “American Dirt” is enviably easy to read. It is determinedly apolitical. The deep roots of these forced migrations are never interrogated; the American reader can read without fear of uncomfortable self-reproach. It asks only for us to accept that “these people are people,” while giving us the saintly to root for and the barbarous to deplore — and then congratulating us for caring.
adicionado por kidzdoc | editarThe New York Times, Parul Sehgal (Jan 17, 2020)
 
A self-professed gabacha, Jeanine Cummins, wrote a book that sucks. Big time.

Her obra de caca belongs to the great American tradition of doing the following:

1. Appropriating genius works by people of color

2. Slapping a coat of mayonesa on them to make palatable to taste buds estados-unidenses and

3. Repackaging them for mass racially “colorblind” consumption.

Rather than look us in the eye, many gabachos prefer to look down their noses at us. Rather than face that we are their moral and intellectual equals, they happily pity us. Pity is what inspires their sweet tooth for Mexican pain, a craving many of them hide. This denial motivates their spending habits, resulting in a preference for trauma porn that wears a social justice fig leaf. To satisfy this demand, Cummins tossed together American Dirt, a “road thriller” that wears an I’m-giving-a-voice-to-the-voiceless-masses merkin.
adicionado por kidzdoc | editarTropics of Meta, Myriam Gurba (Dec 12, 2019)
 
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Lydia Quixano Perez lives in the Mexican city of Acapulco. She runs a bookstore. She has a son, Luca, the love of her life, and a wonderful husband who is a journalist. And while cracks are beginning to show in Acapulco because of the drug cartels, her life is, by and large, reasonably comfortable. Even though she knows they'll never sell, Lydia stocks some of her all-time favorite books in her store. And then one day a man enters the shop to browse and comes up to the register with four books he would like to buy, two of them her favorites. Javier is erudite. He is charming. And, unbeknownst to Lydia, he is the jefe of the newest drug cartel that has gruesomely taken over the city. When Lydia's husband's tell-all profile of Javier is published, none of their lives will ever be the same. Forced to flee, Lydia and eight-year-old Luca soon find themselves miles and worlds away from their comfortable middle-class existence.

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