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Something Deeply Hidden: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime (2019)

de Sean Carroll

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245883,415 (4.03)1
"Caltech physicist and New York Times bestselling author Sean Carroll shows that there are multiple copies of you. And everyone else. Really. Something Deeply Hidden begins with the news that physics is in a crisis. Quantum mechanics underlies all of modern physics but major gaps in the theory have been ignored since 1927. Science popularizers keep telling us how weird it is, how contradictory, how impossible it is to understand. Academics discourage students from working on the "dead end" of quantum foundations. Putting his professional reputation on the line, Carroll says that crisis can now come to an end. We just have to accept that there is more than one of us in the universe. There are many, many Sean Carrolls. Many of every one of us The Many Worlds Theory of quantum behavior says that every time there is a quantum event, a world splits off with everything in it the same, except in that other world the quantum event didn't happen. As you read this, you are splitting into multiple copies of yourself thousands of times per second. Step-by-step in Carroll's uniquely lucid way, he sets out the major objections to this utterly mind-blowing notion until his case is inescapably established. The holy grail of modern physics is reconciling quantum mechanics with Einstein's general relativity -- his theory of curved spacetime. Carroll argues that our refusal to face up to the mysteries of quantum mechanics has blinded us, and that spacetime and gravity naturally emerge from a deeper reality called the wave function. No book for a popular audience has attempted to make this radical argument. We're on the threshold of a new way of understanding the cosmos." --… (mais)
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Carroll makes this difficult concept a bit more accessible. Glad to see more advocates of Many Worlds interpretation. :) ( )
  SeekingApatheia | Apr 13, 2021 |
I've read a fair bit about quantum physics but really couldn't follow this very well. He seemed to over-explain some things, then assume the reader already knew about others. Then he went into a 25-page Socratic Dialogue in the middle which just irritated me. I much prefer John Gribben as an explainer of the quantum world. Maybe this book would better suit someone who actually has a physics degree rather than an enthusiastic amateur like me! ( )
  SChant | Aug 12, 2020 |
What a thought provoking book! Typically, I find “popular science” books very bland and shallow, but Carroll spared no detail from the reader, yet explains every concept extremely thoughtfully and likely easier for non-physicists to understand. I appreciate his wholehearted effort to write a book that tells the story of quantum mechanics, even though it is feared by many. Highly recommend this book to anyone interested in science, physics, the universe or human thought. ( )
  mollymcd4 | Jul 31, 2020 |
Sean Caroll tries to accomplish a herculean task in this one. Bridging the gap between quantum-physics scientists/philosophers and laymen, while at the same detailing how the many-worlds interpretation of the quantum world best fits the facts we know.

I must admit I could not follow most of the math and hard science in it, but I insisted on finishing it to at least know what fundamentals I need to brush up on or learn for future readings. It gave me a desire to know more about the fundamentals and I will re-read it after that to see if it clears up some of my current lapses in understanding.

It's a heavy book and I only recommend it to those that have at least college-level grasps of quantum physics and Bayesian mathematics. ( )
  parzivalTheVirtual | Mar 22, 2020 |
Interesting book about the fundamentals of quantum mechanics. Goes a bit off the deep end in the later chapters. I felt fortunate to have an understanding of Fourier analysis and the equivalence of time and frequency domains to help me begin to understand some of it. The first few chapters give one of the best explanations I have seen about the measurement problem. Ie that detecting an electron causes the wave function to ‘collapse’. Good book. But strictly for physicists. ( )
  jvgravy | Oct 16, 2019 |
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"Caltech physicist and New York Times bestselling author Sean Carroll shows that there are multiple copies of you. And everyone else. Really. Something Deeply Hidden begins with the news that physics is in a crisis. Quantum mechanics underlies all of modern physics but major gaps in the theory have been ignored since 1927. Science popularizers keep telling us how weird it is, how contradictory, how impossible it is to understand. Academics discourage students from working on the "dead end" of quantum foundations. Putting his professional reputation on the line, Carroll says that crisis can now come to an end. We just have to accept that there is more than one of us in the universe. There are many, many Sean Carrolls. Many of every one of us The Many Worlds Theory of quantum behavior says that every time there is a quantum event, a world splits off with everything in it the same, except in that other world the quantum event didn't happen. As you read this, you are splitting into multiple copies of yourself thousands of times per second. Step-by-step in Carroll's uniquely lucid way, he sets out the major objections to this utterly mind-blowing notion until his case is inescapably established. The holy grail of modern physics is reconciling quantum mechanics with Einstein's general relativity -- his theory of curved spacetime. Carroll argues that our refusal to face up to the mysteries of quantum mechanics has blinded us, and that spacetime and gravity naturally emerge from a deeper reality called the wave function. No book for a popular audience has attempted to make this radical argument. We're on the threshold of a new way of understanding the cosmos." --

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