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Freedom Soup de Tami Charles
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Freedom Soup (edição: 2019)

de Tami Charles (Autor), Jacqueline Alcántara (Ilustrador)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaConversas
7611283,272 (4.5)Nenhum(a)
Join the celebration in the kitchen as a family makes their traditional New Year's soup -- and shares the story of how Haitian independence came to be. The shake-shake of maracas vibrates down to my toes. Ti Gran's feet tap-tap to the rhythm. Every year, Haitians all over the world ring in the new year by eating a special soup, a tradition dating back to the Haitian Revolution. This year, Ti Gran is teaching Belle how to make the soup -- Freedom Soup -- just like she was taught when she was a little girl. Together, they dance and clap as they prepare the holiday feast, and Ti Gran tells Belle about the history of the soup, the history of Belle's family, and the history of Haiti, where Belle's family is from. In this celebration of cultural traditions passed from one generation to the next, Jacqueline Alcántara's lush illustrations bring to life both Belle's story and the story of the Haitian Revolution. Tami Charles's lyrical text, as accessible as it is sensory, makes for a tale that readers will enjoy to the last drop.… (mais)
Membro:Jessica.Kirkland
Título:Freedom Soup
Autores:Tami Charles (Autor)
Outros autores:Jacqueline Alcántara (Ilustrador)
Informação:Candlewick (2019), 32 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:*****
Etiquetas:fiction, picture book, grades k-3, Haitian, Haiti, New Year, freedom, family, tradition, slavery

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Freedom Soup de Tami Charles

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Freedom Soup is about a literal soup but it is also symbolic. The soup symbolizes the character's freedom. It is a grandma and her granddaughter making soup that there ancestors had made to celebrate their freedom. The grandma tells the story of how they fought for their freedom and the illustrations show the memories while having the pot of soup and the aroma remain in the bottom of the picture, always there and ready to eat. The recipe for freedom soup is even given in the last page of the book. The images in this story are so passionate that even though this did not happen to me and I never knew much about Haiti's history I feel the passion and all the feelings that they are feeling in the story. The writing and the imagery and the visuals invoke feeling in the reader on every page and that's what makes this story so moving and meaningful. ( )
  JacquelynLochner | Feb 4, 2020 |
As if the pictures were not vibrant enough, Tami Charles doctors up her pages with descriptive, vivid language as the main characters doctor up their freedom soup. Her use of hyphenated words and adjectives made me feel like I was in the kitchen next to Ti Gran and Belle. Like I was immersed in their culture, celebrating Haitian independence. I love how their history was told in a story format passed down from Ti Gran to Belle to the readers. Food was shared, celebrations were shared, and most importantly their story of slavery to freedom was shared. Charles extends his invitation to this celebration as he gives us the recipe of freedom soup on the last page. ( )
  cblanco | Feb 4, 2020 |
Esta resenha foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Resenhistas do LibraryThing.
What a delightful read....I'd give this 10 stars if I could! "Freedom Soup" shares inter-generational love, Haitian history and culture, and and the spirit of better things coming in the new year. My 12 year old granddaughter and I read this and felt absolutely jazzed with both the information and the lovely artwork. The story of Haitian slavery and the fight for freedom with a revolution. "Freedom Soup" is a celebration of people and of the freedom that many of us take for granted. Artwork is done in pencil, marker, and gouache, and assembled digitally. The recipe for Freedom Soup and an Author's Note are found in the back matter. A great way to introduce topics of: culture, freedom, Haiti, revolution, slavery, and many more. This is a book to have on your shelves, beautiful story and Candlewick Press has another winner! ( )
  Janismin | Jan 8, 2020 |
Esta resenha foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Resenhistas do LibraryThing.
A young girl and her Haitian grandmother joyfully cook Freedom Soup in this story of Haiti's successful struggle to end slavery.

"Know why they call it Freedom Soup?" Ti Gran asks.
"Because it's free?"
It is the same answer that I always give. Ti Grans laughs her loud, belly-deep laugh.
"Oh, Belle. Nothing in this world is free, not even freedom."
She begins to tell a story, the same one she tells every year. A story of the place she was born: Haiti.

The illustrations, created with gouache, pencil, and marker, are alive with color, joy, music, and dance. Ti Gran wears a brightly colored yellow dress and matching headwrap, and Belle wears long cornrows and an apron to match her grandmother's dress. Both Belle and Ti Gran move expressively and dance while cooking and storytelling. The extended family that gathers to enjoy their traditional Freedom Soup on New Year's Day is large, happy, and celebratory.

The triumph of the historical revolution is not depicted with blood and misery, but rather with proud Haitians boldly marching to war with bare feet and makeshift weapons.

A Freedom Soup recipe and Author's Note round out this wonderful picture book suggested for Grades K-4.

http://shelf-employed.blogspot.com ( )
  shelf-employed | Jan 1, 2020 |
Esta resenha foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Resenhistas do LibraryThing.
This lyrical book tells the story of a girl and her grandma, Ti Gran, fixing a stew called Freedom Soup. This dish is commonly eaten in Haitian households at celebrations for the New Year to commemorate the end of slavery. Ti-Gran tells Belle that slaves had to make the soup for their masters, but never got to eat it themselves until they were free. As the author explains in a note at the end of the story:

“My husband’s late grandmother, Ti Gran, gave me my first bowl of Freedom Soup, also known as Soup Joumou. As soon as I tasted it, I knew there had to be a story behind the flavors of pride, victory, and joy. Ti Gran was a feisty yet gentle soul who taught me the history of the soup.”

The text mostly focuses on Ti Gran and her granddaughter Belle preparing the soup, emphasizing the savoriness of the soup and the sweetness of freedom.

As they cook, Ti Gran explains how the people in Haiti were slaves until they were liberated by a revolution. Belle can visualize the history from Ti Gran’s descriptions:

“I see the colors of freedom: the tan streets of Port-au-Prince, covered in broken black chains, kettles of hot yellow soup, a sweet pumpkiny-garlic aroma filling the air.

I see Ti Gran’s people. My people.

Eating soup to celebrate the end of slavery.

Eating soup to celebrate the start of freedom.”

The story ends in a riot of color as the whole extended family comes over to share Freedom Soup, and talk, sing, and dance. Belle is proud that she helped prepare the meal, and that it turned out so well:

“We share stories of Ti Gran’s faraway island, and taste freedom again . . . and again . . . and again . . . ”

A recipe for the soup is included at the back of the book.

Illustrator Jacqueline Alcántara uses lush colors and fluid lines to depict cooking, dancing, fighting against slavery, and celebrating freedom.

Readers in the recommended age group of 5-9 won’t learn how or why slavery was imposed on Haiti, nor by whom, unless an adult fills them in; background is provided in the Author’s Note. The Note is written in a way that will be understandable to a young audience if adults care to share its contents. But even without the history of Haiti, the message that freedom is never “free” comes through loud and clear in the story.

Evaluation: It is commendable that children will learn from this book a glimmering of a counter-narrative to the usual Christopher Columbus story. In fact, when Columbus and his men came to Haiti and the nearby islands of the Caribbean they instituted astoundingly vicious policies. As an article from the Harvard Magazine “The Crimson” recounts:

“By 1515, on Hispaniola alone, war and slavery had killed 200,000 Arawaks, or 80 percent of the original population, by conservative estimates. Eventually, all of the natives were wiped out. Harvard historian Samuel Eliot Morison has written that the ‘cruel policy initiated by Columbus and pursued by his successors resulted in complete genocide.’”

[Hispaniola is one of the Caribbean islands where Columbus made landfall when he “discovered” America. Today it is divided into two separate, sovereign nations, the Spanish-speaking Dominican Republic to the east and French / Haitian Creole-speaking Haiti to the west.]

Following the near decimation of the indigenous people from forced labor, disease, suicide, and war, the Spanish, under advisement of the Catholic priest Bartolomeu de las Casas and with the blessing of the Catholic Church, began importing Africans as slaves. During the French colonial period beginning in 1625, the economy of Haiti (then known as Saint-Domingue) was also based on slavery, and the practice there was regarded as the most brutal in the world.

Though this story focuses on family bonds and celebratory traditions of Afro-Caribbean culture, children of other backgrounds may be curious enough to inquire about the history of Haiti and its sad legacy. Regardless, it will be hard for non-Afro-Caribbean readers to resist sharing Belle's joy and enthusiasm as she participates in this ritual. Readers can be prompted to compare her celebration to other holidays they know about, and will realize how similar all of them are in many ways, but with different spices and stories flavoring the festivities. One hopes this will lead readers to an appreciation for the richness and diversity of America as a nation of immigrants. We have so much to gain by focusing on what we share and how much we can learn from each other, rather than being fearful of any differences. ( )
  nbmars | Dec 23, 2019 |
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Today is New Year's Day.
Author's Note: My husband's late grandmother, Ti Gran, gave me my first bowl of Freedom Soup, also known as Soup Joumou.
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Join the celebration in the kitchen as a family makes their traditional New Year's soup -- and shares the story of how Haitian independence came to be. The shake-shake of maracas vibrates down to my toes. Ti Gran's feet tap-tap to the rhythm. Every year, Haitians all over the world ring in the new year by eating a special soup, a tradition dating back to the Haitian Revolution. This year, Ti Gran is teaching Belle how to make the soup -- Freedom Soup -- just like she was taught when she was a little girl. Together, they dance and clap as they prepare the holiday feast, and Ti Gran tells Belle about the history of the soup, the history of Belle's family, and the history of Haiti, where Belle's family is from. In this celebration of cultural traditions passed from one generation to the next, Jacqueline Alcántara's lush illustrations bring to life both Belle's story and the story of the Haitian Revolution. Tami Charles's lyrical text, as accessible as it is sensory, makes for a tale that readers will enjoy to the last drop.

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