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Late Migrations: A Natural History of Love and Loss

de Margaret Renkl

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1379153,048 (4.3)36
An Indie Next Selection for July 2019 An Indies Introduce Selection for Summer/Fall 2019 A 2019 Okra Pick A Publishers Weekly "Pick of the Week" From New York Times opinion writer Margaret Renkl comes an unusual, captivating portrait of a family--and of the cycles of joy and grief that inscribe human lives within the natural world. Growing up in Alabama, Renkl was a devoted reader, an explorer of riverbeds and red-dirt roads, and a fiercely loved daughter. Here, in brief essays, she traces a tender and honest portrait of her complicated parents--her exuberant, creative mother; her steady, supportive father--and of the bittersweet moments that accompany a child's transition to caregiver. And here, braided into the overall narrative, Renkl offers observations on the world surrounding her suburban Nashville home. Ringing with rapture and heartache, these essays convey the dignity of bluebirds and rat snakes, monarch butterflies and native bees. As these two threads haunt and harmonize with each other, Renkl suggests that there is astonishment to be found in common things: in what seems ordinary, in what we all share. For in both worlds--the natural one and our own--"the shadow side of love is always loss, and grief is only love's own twin." Gorgeously illustrated by the author's brother, Billy Renkl, Late Migrations is an assured and memorable debut.… (mais)
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Mostrando 1-5 de 9 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
A friend read this book and left a glowing review so I decided to read it. I absolutely loved it! It's a debut book by Margaret Renkl who is a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times where her essays appear weekly. Late Migrations is a memoir of essays that anyone can relate to no matter where in their life they may be.

Reading this book was like taking a trip with Margaret as she told us bits of her life while growing up in Alabama to becoming a wife, mother, and caregiver to her parents and in-laws. She writes about love, an imperfect but beloved family life, caregiving, loss and grief, fear, and motherhood. She cares so much and is very knowledgeable about nature. She tells us about her interactions with birds, bees, butterflies, flowers, and snakes. She sees the beauty in things that most of us ignore.

I was moved by her beautiful, poetic writing which held a lot of meaning for me. I read the hardcopy so I could see the gorgeous illustrations done by her brother, Billy Renkl. So much talent in this sister and brother team! Highly recommended with 5 Stars. ( )
  pegmcdaniel | Apr 22, 2021 |
What a moving collection of observations, memories, stories, and feelings of love and loss! The author weaves brief vignettes about nature and family to create a lush, literary tapestry which wraps itself around the reader like a cocoon. Nature's events and life events co-mingle, becoming one. Margaret Renkl has used poetic prose to capture the essence and power of love and loss in our lives. Anyone who has loved and lost loved ones will resonate to these vignettes. Take your time, absorb the beauty and truth of each essay, and carry these words with you through your days. ( )
  hemlokgang | Dec 19, 2020 |
This will probably end up being my favorite book of 2020. Observation--that is what this book is about. Observation about family and nature. Love and loss. Wow--read this ( )
  kayanelson | Oct 31, 2020 |
This book is a memoir, I think, told in a series of mini-essays about family, birds, nature, and grieving. Renkl's brother contributed the illustrations, which are lovely. Here are some parts that I marked:

In "Imperfect-Family Beatitudes" she ends with "Blessed are the parents whose final words on leaving--the house, the care, the least consequential phone call--are always "I love you." THey will leave behind children who are lost and still found, broken and somehow, still whole."

"One evening I looked out, and there in the growing twilight was a male scarlet tanager taking a drink. I had never seen one in this yard before, and I have not seen one since. But I think often of that beautiful bird, of the few seconds I could stand at my window and watch him taking drink of water in the gloaming. To me he looked like a blood-red, hollow-boned embodiment of grace. ( )
  banjo123 | Oct 12, 2020 |
Poetic, somber, jubilant, heart-wrenching, and beautiful; this collection of short essays from Margaret Renkl is a must read. Essays about the nature in her backyard, history of her grandparents, her childhood, her parents, motherhood, and migratory patterns of birds. This collection encompasses love and loss through a personal and natural lens. Interspersed throughout are beautiful color images of animals and plants. A deeply touching and deeply personal memoir of sorts. One that readers will come back to time and again. ( )
1 vote ecataldi | Jan 18, 2020 |
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An Indie Next Selection for July 2019 An Indies Introduce Selection for Summer/Fall 2019 A 2019 Okra Pick A Publishers Weekly "Pick of the Week" From New York Times opinion writer Margaret Renkl comes an unusual, captivating portrait of a family--and of the cycles of joy and grief that inscribe human lives within the natural world. Growing up in Alabama, Renkl was a devoted reader, an explorer of riverbeds and red-dirt roads, and a fiercely loved daughter. Here, in brief essays, she traces a tender and honest portrait of her complicated parents--her exuberant, creative mother; her steady, supportive father--and of the bittersweet moments that accompany a child's transition to caregiver. And here, braided into the overall narrative, Renkl offers observations on the world surrounding her suburban Nashville home. Ringing with rapture and heartache, these essays convey the dignity of bluebirds and rat snakes, monarch butterflies and native bees. As these two threads haunt and harmonize with each other, Renkl suggests that there is astonishment to be found in common things: in what seems ordinary, in what we all share. For in both worlds--the natural one and our own--"the shadow side of love is always loss, and grief is only love's own twin." Gorgeously illustrated by the author's brother, Billy Renkl, Late Migrations is an assured and memorable debut.

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