Página inicialGruposDiscussãoExplorarZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

The Lightest Object in the Universe: A Novel…
Carregando...

The Lightest Object in the Universe: A Novel (edição: 2019)

de Kimi Eisele (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1377159,962 (3.5)5
"A triumphant story for anyone with a shred of faith left in the human spirit." --David McGlynn, author of One Day You'll Thank Me   What if the end times allowed people to see and build the world anew? This is the landscape that Kimi Eisele creates in her surprising and original debut novel. Evoking the spirit of such monumental love stories as Cold Mountain and the creative vision of novels like Station ElevenThe Lightest Object in the Universe imagines what happens after the global economy collapses and the electrical grid goes down. In this new world, Carson, on the East Coast, is desperate to find Beatrix, a woman on the West Coast who holds his heart. Working his way along a cross-country railroad line, he encounters lost souls, clever opportunists, and those who believe they'll be saved by an evangelical preacher in the middle of the country. While Carson travels west, Beatrix and her neighbors begin to construct the kind of cooperative community that suggests the end could be, in fact, a bright beginning. Without modern means of communication, will Beatrix and Carson find their way to each other, and what will be left of the old world if they do? The answers may lie with a fifteen-year-old girl who could ultimately decide the fate of the lovers.  The Lightest Object in the Universe is a moving and hopeful story about resilience and adaptation and a testament to the power of community, where our best traits, born of necessity, can begin to emerge.… (mais)
Membro:nossanna
Título:The Lightest Object in the Universe: A Novel
Autores:Kimi Eisele (Autor)
Informação:Algonquin Books (2019), 336 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:****
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Work Information

The Lightest Object in the Universe de Kimi Eisele

Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 5 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 7 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
The Lightest Object in the Universe by Kimi Eisele is yet another post-apocalyptic story. Instead of cannibalistic raiders and a dog-eat-dog world, the world in which Carson and Beatrix find themselves is the exact opposite. Reading this at the end of 2020 where it feels like we currently live in a dog-eat-dog world, this is exactly the message to read.

What is eerie about The Lightest Object in the Universe is just how the modern world ends. A debt crisis that no one can overcome. Rising fuel costs. Inflation the type usually seen in third-world countries. Natural disasters. And a global flu pandemic that “came on like a cold but burned up its victims with fever and drowned their lungs.” As I said, eerie given that Ms. Eisele wrote this well before the world first heard about COVID-19.

While most cross-country journeys that occur in post-apocalyptic stories are full of danger and violence, Carson’s journey is almost peaceful. He meets enough people on the road willing to share their food with him in order to keep him from starving. He finds the necessary supplies to keep him healthy, for the most part, as well as shelter and respite when needed. It is a journey where you never fear for his life.

Meanwhile, Beatrix’s establishing of a new type of community in her neighborhood is similarly anticlimactic. Sure, there are gangs that pop up and threaten violence, but her small band of community leaders finds ways to overcome them with minimum issues. Sure, there are problems, but Beatrix finds a way to overcome them with help from her friends.

So, Carson’s and Beatrix’s post-apocalyptic experiences are a lot less traumatic than most authors would have you believe, which is a nice change. After this year in which you question whether the country will ever reunite into some semblance of cohesion, The Lightest Object in the Universe makes you believe that there is hope for humanity and that not everyone is a complete d-bag. Then again, after 2020, you do wonder if Ms. Eisele is a bit too naive in her worldview. It all depends on where your mind and heart are as you read it. ( )
  jmchshannon | Dec 30, 2020 |
I loved the new twist on the apocalyptic end of the world book genre! Tired of the same old trope of post-ap men running around killing others & grubbing like savages? Then this is your book! This an admirable first book from a local Tucson author. While the writing lagged in places & some sections could have had more depth, I definitely look forward to a next book from her. ( )
  nossanna | Nov 9, 2019 |
The premise of this book is that a world-wide melt down occurred and slowly everything ground to halt until there was no electricity, no water, no gasoline, no way to communicate other than face-to-face, and no food being transported in from the heartland – nothing is what is was before. How is one to survive?

This dystopian novel seems all-too-possible in our present political climate. And while it may fuel our worse nightmares, it also hold out the hope that something good, maybe even better, will emerge from the chaos, fear, and despair.

The book is told through the eyes of Beatrix and Carson. They live 3000 miles apart, but Carson told Beatrix, he would find her if something awful happened so he sets out on a trek across the country to find her. These are well-drawn characters and the premise well drawn as well.

Unfortunately, I found the author’s style of writing is often almost staccato. But that may not be an issue for you, and if it’s not, then by all means pick this book up or put it at the top of your to-be-read list.

My thanks to Algonquin Books and Edeweiss for an eARC. ( )
  OldFriend | Jul 9, 2019 |
The Lightest Object in the Universe by Kimi Eisele is a recommended post-apocalyptic novel.

A flu pandemic sweeps the world, twice. Protests are already tearing the country apart when society completely breaks down after a cyber attack takes out the electrical grid, along with the global economy and everything else. What is left is a world of individuals on their own who must know how to survive by their own wits and means. Carson is living on the East Coast when the collapse happens, while the woman he has been having a long-distance relationship with, Beatrix, lives on the West Coast. While Beatrix finds herself trying to work with her neighbors to create a cooperative community, set up a radio station, and watch out for the gangs of unruly teenagers on bikes who call themselves T-Rizers, Carson sets out to cross the country on foot to find Beatrix.

The narrative alternates between Carson and Beatrix's point-of-view, with a few sections told through teenage Rosie's eyes. Along Carson's journey he encounters a wide variety of people, most of which are adapting to the new world, mostly helpful. Many are heading toward the compound of a man called Jonathan Blue and the Center he leads in Wyoming. He has taken over the radio frequencies and offers food and community for all who come and join his self-styled religious cult. People across the country are headed toward his group, while others stay in place and try to survive by their own strength and wits.

I would probably scoff at this kinder, gentler post-apocalyptic novel, except for the absolutely exceptional writing - and the quality of the writing is exquisite. She also delves deep into her characters, who are good people. You will want the best to happen to them, even if you, like me, doubt the vision created here. There is also a little too much implied finger-pointing about the "various evil whatever entities that brought us to this horrid path, but look at how we can overcome" going on.

Eisele has envisioned a collapse of society that is actually somewhat optimistic. One would imagine that the actual violence is taking place somewhere off the page, because this novel is more about hope, community efforts, and a new beginning, which is kind of nice, but not highly likely in reality. If people can't get along when they are living (generally, in comparison) comfortable lives, how would the end of society suddenly make them try? Beatrix scoffs at armed guards protecting her neighborhood. Really? Digging composting toilets with your neighbors doesn't necessarily bring people together and make them want to share all they have with others. I also found the idea that thousands of people would head off to a cult located in Wyoming a fantastical fabrication.

In the final analysis, suspend your disbelief and read this novel for the determination of Carson to get to Beatrix.

Disclosure: My review copy was courtesy of Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill.
http://www.shetreadssoftly.com/2019/07/the-lightest-object-in-universe.html ( )
  SheTreadsSoftly | Jul 7, 2019 |
I count dystopian or post-apocalyptic novels among my favorites, but having read quite a few of them over the years I’ve started to realize that finding something even a little different in the genre is not easy – not that I’m going to let that keep me from trying. Kimi Eisele’s The Lightest Object in the Universe is one dystopian novel that does manage to stand out from the crowd a bit. And that’s both the good news and the bad news.

When the world economy finally crashes from all the abuses it’s suffered at the hands of incompetent and criminal manipulators over the decades, it drags governments and the whole power grid down with it. The United States, it seems, is particularly hard hit by the implosion. Suddenly, cell phones, personal computers, tablets, and smart watches are little more than plastic bricks of various sizes and shapes. Mass communication is a thing of the past. Ready or not, everyone is on his own, and survival is something that will have to be worked at every day for the rest of your life. And it won’t be easy.

Carson and Beatrix are on opposite ends of the country when it happens. The pair met just days before the collapse, but both of them remember the sparks that flew during the little time they were able to share together before Beatrix had to return to the West Coast. Now, Carson is determined somehow to make his way from one coast to the other – and he is prepared to walk all the way even without knowing whether or not Beatriz will be there when, or if, he finally gets there.

What makes The Lightest Object in the Universe different from most novels of its type is its ever-present sense of optimism and goodwill, a feeling that the good people in the world so overwhelmingly outnumber the bad ones that things will work out in the end. Everywhere our main characters turn they are met with people willing to share their expertise or whatever else they can spare. Oh, sure, there are some bad guys out there who will gladly kill and rape at the drop of a hat, but they never seem to get the upper hand for long. But this brings us to the “good news-bad news” scenario I mentioned earlier.

I suppose that Kimi Eisele’s novel exposes me as being more a cynic than an optimist because I was never able to get completely comfortable with an apocalyptic world in which the crime rate is seemingly lower now than it was in the world that preceded it. This is a world, in fact, in which most of the crime - and even that is mostly theft and relatively minor assault - is perpetrated by pre-teens and teens on bicycles. If already dangerous neighborhoods and large cities are violently tearing themselves apart, it is all happening behind the scenes. This allows the overall sense of optimism to be maintained, but it kept me wondering what was happening elsewhere, and how long it would be before those worlds would collide with this one. That’s the bad news – at least for more cynical readers like me.

The good news is that this is an uplifting novel, one filled with hope and confidence in human nature, that I enjoyed reading despite my occasional twinges of doubt. It is more a story about the creation of a new world than it is one about the destruction of an old world.

And that just may be exactly what you need right now, so take a look. ( )
  SamSattler | Jul 6, 2019 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 7 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico
Canonical LCC

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

"A triumphant story for anyone with a shred of faith left in the human spirit." --David McGlynn, author of One Day You'll Thank Me   What if the end times allowed people to see and build the world anew? This is the landscape that Kimi Eisele creates in her surprising and original debut novel. Evoking the spirit of such monumental love stories as Cold Mountain and the creative vision of novels like Station ElevenThe Lightest Object in the Universe imagines what happens after the global economy collapses and the electrical grid goes down. In this new world, Carson, on the East Coast, is desperate to find Beatrix, a woman on the West Coast who holds his heart. Working his way along a cross-country railroad line, he encounters lost souls, clever opportunists, and those who believe they'll be saved by an evangelical preacher in the middle of the country. While Carson travels west, Beatrix and her neighbors begin to construct the kind of cooperative community that suggests the end could be, in fact, a bright beginning. Without modern means of communication, will Beatrix and Carson find their way to each other, and what will be left of the old world if they do? The answers may lie with a fifteen-year-old girl who could ultimately decide the fate of the lovers.  The Lightest Object in the Universe is a moving and hopeful story about resilience and adaptation and a testament to the power of community, where our best traits, born of necessity, can begin to emerge.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Capas populares

Links rápidos

Avaliação

Média: (3.5)
0.5
1
1.5
2 3
2.5
3 8
3.5 3
4 8
4.5
5 3

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 164,573,037 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível