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Hope and Other Punch Lines de Julie Buxbaum
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Hope and Other Punch Lines (edição: 2019)

de Julie Buxbaum (Autor)

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1026206,074 (3.47)1
The New York Times bestselling author of Tell Me Three Things and What to Say Next delivers a poignant and hopeful novel about resilience and reinvention, first love and lifelong friendship, the legacies of loss, and the stories we tell ourselves in order to survive. "A luminous, lovely story about a girl who builds a future from the ashes of her past." --KATHLEEN GLASGOW, New York Times bestselling author of Girl in Pieces Sometimes looking to the past helps you find your future. Abbi Hope Goldstein is like every other teenager, with a few smallish exceptions: her famous alter ego, Baby Hope, is the subject of internet memes, she has asthma, and sometimes people spontaneously burst into tears when they recognize her. Abbi has lived almost her entire life in the shadow of the terrorist attacks of September 11. On that fateful day, she was captured in what became an iconic photograph: in the picture, Abbi (aka "Baby Hope") wears a birthday crown and grasps a red balloon; just behind her, the South Tower of the World Trade Center is collapsing. Now, fifteen years later, Abbi is desperate for anonymity and decides to spend the summer before her seventeenth birthday incognito as a counselor at Knights Day Camp two towns away. She's psyched for eight weeks in the company of four-year-olds, none of whom have ever heard of Baby Hope. Too bad Noah Stern, whose own world was irrevocably shattered on that terrible day, has a similar summer plan. Noah believes his meeting Baby Hope is fate. Abbi is sure it's a disaster. Soon, though, the two team up to ask difficult questions about the history behind the Baby Hope photo. But is either of them ready to hear the answers?… (mais)
Membro:Paulusmediacenter
Título:Hope and Other Punch Lines
Autores:Julie Buxbaum (Autor)
Informação:Delacorte Press (2019), 320 pages
Coleções:fiction
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:new

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Hope and Other Punchlines de Julie Buxbaum

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DNF

Julie Buxbaum has quickly become and auto buy author for me, so when I saw she had a new release out I knew I would be reaching to read it ASAP.

This started off with learning two things that made you know it was going to be an emotional read. It follows a teenager who was a baby during 9/11, and some of the things she is facing today from being there that day. I thought this was going to grip from the beginning and I would devour this like I did her previous books. It did not. I was so bored. I did not like Noah at all and started to skip his parts of the story. I then found myself skimming to the end just to see if anything else happens hoping for anything to intrigue me. It did not, and sadly I am DNF (did not finish this one) ( )
  SimplyKelina | Sep 19, 2020 |
I really wish I had liked this one more. Too bad that it was just full of cliches and one main character (Noah) I disliked from beginning to end. I thought Abbi was fine, but she honestly needed a life since she seemed wholly dependent on her ex-best friend Cat to give her a social life. And I also kind of hated that Abbi was fine with forgiving Noah and his whole blackmail thing, but didn't want to try to make up with Cat. I don't know, I think Buxbaum just dropped that whole thing and it didn't make sense in context of what the book was supposed to be about, that your life can change in a moment, so love, forgive, etc. and just be in the moment.

"Hope and Other Punchlines" follows 17 year old Abbi and Noah. Abbi we find out is pretty famous due to her picture being taken when she was 1 and a woman carrying her out of one of the towers that fell on 9/11. Abbi hates being known as "Baby Hope" and has to deal with total strangers running up to her, hugging her, and crying all over her. She is working at a camp for the summer to try to come to terms with the end of her long-term friendship with her best friend Cat and the fact that she is scared she may have caught something from 9/11 and that a lot of people who were near Ground Zero that day developed cancer. So that seems like a lot right? Well Buxbaum then introduces Noah. Noah is focused on finding the men and women in the photo of "Baby Hope." When he realizes that Abbi is also working at the same summer camp he is, he tries to talk her into helping him out with tracking people down. When she refuses, he blackmails her to helping him or he will let everyone know who she is. Yeah, he's not a charmer. That first exposure to Noah colored the whole book. I just didn't like him.

So first off, Abbi's family is a bit messy (not in a bad way). Her parents divorced when she was younger, but still live 2 houses down from each other. They are constantly in and out of each other's homes. It makes zero sense why they are not together and I started to think of GOOP and conscious uncoupling and shuddered. We get to hear via Abbi's POV her thoughts on 9/11, how it makes her feel to be one of the few who survived that day, and how lonely she is now that she and Cat are no longer friends. Why she doesn't tell her parents she thinks she is ill is some teenager logic which I didn't even mind. When we're young and even when we're older we think we can just ignore something and it somehow isn't real.

Noah bugged me a lot. I didn't like him even when we find out what he is supposedly trying to do via Abbi meeting with other survivors. I thought the whole thing made zero sense and should have been resolved with actually speaking to his mother. He was an ass towards his stepfather and just acted entitled the whole book. His ongoing mess of trying to find a funny 9/11 joke made me cringe inside.

The secondary characters don't feel very developed. I felt sorry for Cat especially when you hear about her backstory. I really think it would have been smarter for Buxbaum to maybe have dual POVs with Abbi and Cat instead. I think having it focused on Noah added nothing. And I pretty much hated that Abbi and Cat never had the conversation that I think they should have. Just trying to do a big well friends grow apart thing didn't work especially when we hear about how close these two were and perhaps Cat just had lingering issues about the whole Baby Hope thing.

The writing was fine, the chapters were short though. Sometimes the chapters were only a page. Buxbaum starts on Abbi's POV and then goes back and forth to her and Noah.

The setting of the book primarily takes place in New Jersey, but with references to New York City and the anniversary of 9/11. I thought the whole book was slightly depressing. I was 21 on 9/11 and was about to head to school in Pittsburgh when we heard about the planes and towers. My mom made me drive back to my hometown and we were all scared. I had friends who were in the National Guard who were scared because our first thought was war when we heard the planes were brought down intentionally. I just remember it feeling surreal. That I was in some weird dream and I would wake up soon.

The ending is supposed to be uplifting I think, and I did think it was great of Buxbaum to highlight all of the diseases that people at Ground Zero were being diagnosed with post 9/11. I think I disagree with her though that 9/11 isn't in people's minds. I mean that's why the U.S. went to war (again) in Iraq. It's brought up about every other week when the media is discussing Saudi Arabia. Maybe it's uppermost in my mind since I started off in government in 2013 and 9/11 was mentioned on a daily basis in our reports. We used that as a reference point for the longest time in any report discussing Iraq and Afghanistan. Anyway, I ultimately thought this was an okay read, just not in love with it. ( )
  ObsidianBlue | Jul 1, 2020 |
*I WAS PROVIDED A PHYSICAL COPY FOR THE PURPOSES OF A BLOG TOUR. THIS HAS NOT AFFECTED MY OPINION*

I'm just going to say right now that I was entirely let down and a little bit disgusted by this book.

When I was offered a position on a blog tour for Hope & Other Punchlines, I was really excited. It was pitched as a comedy meeting tragedy with a bit of romance, along with other elements that stuck out to me. However, once diving into it, all the problems began to form.

For one, every chapter is short and choppy. Most of the sentences are repeating and/or contradict each other, and there's barely enough information to take in. It was completely character driven, but the problem with that was that the characters were barely even developed a quarter of the way through.

Abbi is constantly talking about being Baby Hope. I get it, you hate being this pillar of hope and perseverance. Stop talking about it every other line and actually do something.

Noah, on the other hand, annoyed me from the first sentence of his POV. Not only is he obsessed with stalking and tracking down 9/11 victims, but he also blackmails Abbi into doing his bidding. And we were told this was supposed to be somewhat romantic? Bleh. Another thing was that he was focused on making a successful 9/11 joke. Excuse me, but since when was a terrorist attack funny? I get it, some people are able to joke about it and all, but as a reader who takes that day very seriously, I feel that was a little inconsiderate to our emotions and how that would come across.

I ended up DNFing this because of how craptastic it was going. I'm usually not this hard on books, but this one really fell way way way below the line. Honest to God, I never ever say this about anything I read, but I absolutely HATED this one. For that, I rate it 1 star. I wouldn't suggest this book, obviously, but if something about my ranting review interested you in reading it, knock yourself out. ( )
  booking_belle | Nov 8, 2019 |
I received a copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. My thoughts and opinions are my own. Any quotes I use are from an unpublished copy and may not reflect the finished product.

Hope and Other Punch Lines provided me with a new perspective regarding the events that happened on 9/11. I know where I was when it happened, and I've always understood what it meant on a larger scale, but I have never made myself look closely at the details. I'm ashamed to admit that I didn't know there were jumpers, people that chose to leap to their deaths over the alternative, and it's made me reflect on my life as well as that horrible day.

Julie Buxbaum has taken a tragedy and shown us the impact through new eyes. Abbi and Noah both survived something that day, even though their experiences were drastically different. Abbi became a symbol, a tangible hope that people could cling to, and Noah lost his father. Honestly, I didn't like Noah at first. I hated what he essentially forced Abbi to do. I understood his reasons, but they didn't justify his actions. I wish his choices had been addressed with more depth and sincerity, but Noah used humor as a coping mechanism.

Abbi was a kind and selfless character, and she allowed people to share their grief with her, even though it made her uncomfortable. Her life wasn't her own, since people associated her with the Baby Hope photo. Even though she was a baby at the time, people felt compelled to share their personal stories and tragedies with her, regardless of where they were (supermarket, sidewalk, etc.). She even went along with Noah's plan, disregarding her personal feelings, and was nice to him despite how he handled the entire situation. Her desire to avoid conflict and negativity is what caused her to keep a big secret from her family, which I wish had resulted in more than a slap on the wrist.

If you ignore how their relationship started, Abbi and Noah had an adorkable romance. I really loved their conversations in the car, and even the subtle foot taps they shared. I enjoyed Noah's friendship with Jack as well, and how easily the two boys accepted Abbi as one of their own. All of the relationships in this book (good and bad) were authentic and completely relatable.

The parents and families were fantastic and flawed. Abbi's parents were divorced, but the two remained close friends and lived on the same street. They were both involved in their daughter's life, and they talked to her like she was an adult and her opinion mattered. Also, I loved Abbi's no-nonsense grandmother! Noah's mom remarried after a decade or so, and Noah's stepfather is present, even if he's not actively involved in his stepson's life. They were just different people, neither of them bad, but they'd never tried to see past their differences before. I enjoyed seeing how their relationship progressed, and was happy to see they there were both willing to try.

Buxbaum didn't shy away from the hard topics and conversations, and it was a really eye-opening experience for me. I feel like I have a new understanding, a more educated perspective, and also a greater appreciation for the people who were present during the attacks. A lot of people have medical issues that are directly related to chemicals they were exposed to on 9/11, and there's still a lot we don't know. I think the author has created something that will encourage people to remember, and she does it in a way that's both hopeful and honest.

This review was originally posted at Do You Dog-ear? on May 28, 2019. ( )
  doyoudogear | Oct 11, 2019 |
In this timely and historical novel, teens Abbi and Noah find their lives changed by the events of 9/11 in different ways. They find each other while serving as counselors at a summer camp for children where they help each other grow and heal from their pasts. Making this particularly timely is the discussion of how 9/11 affected the health of all those who were there, with many of the people who were there have died from various illnesses associated with the contamination they encountered that day. This is a wonderful young adult book that examines an important event in our recent history and how it impacted so many of us in so many ways. ( )
  Susan.Macura | Jul 19, 2019 |
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---Don DeLillo, Harper's, December 2001
All photographs are accurate. None of them is the truth.
---Richard Avedon
Now, Andy, did you hear about this one?
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The New York Times bestselling author of Tell Me Three Things and What to Say Next delivers a poignant and hopeful novel about resilience and reinvention, first love and lifelong friendship, the legacies of loss, and the stories we tell ourselves in order to survive. "A luminous, lovely story about a girl who builds a future from the ashes of her past." --KATHLEEN GLASGOW, New York Times bestselling author of Girl in Pieces Sometimes looking to the past helps you find your future. Abbi Hope Goldstein is like every other teenager, with a few smallish exceptions: her famous alter ego, Baby Hope, is the subject of internet memes, she has asthma, and sometimes people spontaneously burst into tears when they recognize her. Abbi has lived almost her entire life in the shadow of the terrorist attacks of September 11. On that fateful day, she was captured in what became an iconic photograph: in the picture, Abbi (aka "Baby Hope") wears a birthday crown and grasps a red balloon; just behind her, the South Tower of the World Trade Center is collapsing. Now, fifteen years later, Abbi is desperate for anonymity and decides to spend the summer before her seventeenth birthday incognito as a counselor at Knights Day Camp two towns away. She's psyched for eight weeks in the company of four-year-olds, none of whom have ever heard of Baby Hope. Too bad Noah Stern, whose own world was irrevocably shattered on that terrible day, has a similar summer plan. Noah believes his meeting Baby Hope is fate. Abbi is sure it's a disaster. Soon, though, the two team up to ask difficult questions about the history behind the Baby Hope photo. But is either of them ready to hear the answers?

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