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Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and…
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Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland (edição: 2019)

de Patrick Radden Keefe (Autor), Matthew Blaney (Narrador), Random House Audio (Publisher)

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1,2996711,017 (4.42)112
""Meticulously reported, exquisitely written, and grippingly told, Say Nothing is a work of revelation." --David Grann, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Killers of the Flower Moon From award-winning New Yorker staff writer Patrick Radden Keefe, a stunning, intricate narrative about a notorious killing in Northern Ireland and its devastating repercussions In December 1972, Jean McConville, a thirty-eight-year-old mother of ten, was dragged from her Belfast home by masked intruders, her children clinging to her legs. They never saw her again. Her abduction was one of the most notorious episodes of the vicious conflict known as The Troubles. Everyone in the neighborhood knew the I.R.A. was responsible. But in a climate of fear and paranoia, no one would speak of it. In 2003, five years after an accord brought an uneasy peace to Northern Ireland, a set of human bones was discovered on a beach. McConville's children knew it was their mother when they were told a blue safety pin was attached to the dress--with so many kids, McConville always kept it handy for diapers or ripped clothes. Patrick Radden Keefe's mesmerizing book on the bitter conflict in Northern Ireland and its aftermath uses the McConville case as a starting point for the tale of a society wracked by a violent guerrilla war, a war whose consequences have never been reckoned with. The brutal violence seared not only people like the McConville children, but also I.R.A. members embittered by a peace that fell far short of the goal of a united Ireland, and left them wondering whether the killings they committed were not justified acts of war, but simple murders. From radical and impetuous I.R.A. terrorists--or volunteers, depending on which side one was on--such as Dolours Price, who, when she was barely out of her teens, was already planting bombs in London and targeting informers for execution, to the ferocious I.R.A. mastermind known as The Dark, to the spy games and dirty schemes of the British Army, to Gerry Adams, who negotiated the peace and denied his I.R.A. past, betraying his hardcore comrades--Say Nothing conjures a world of passion, betrayal, vengeance, and anguish"--"A narrative about a notorious killing that took place in Northern Ireland during The Troubles and its devastating repercussions to this day"--… (mais)
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Título:Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland
Autores:Patrick Radden Keefe (Autor)
Outros autores:Matthew Blaney (Narrador), Random House Audio (Publisher)
Informação:Random House Audio (2019)
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
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Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland de Patrick Radden Keefe (Author)

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I have never understood people who see the world as binary when it comes to right and wrong. Almost always it is shades of gray when you look at it and I can think of no better example that studying "the troubles" in Northern Ireland. This is an expansive book that takes a single kidnapping and disappearance and uses it as a starting point to examine Northern Ireland from around the 1960s through to the present day. That's a lot to cover but Mr. Keefe does it masterfully. I learned a whole lot from this book but it never felt like a lesson. The book moves along at a great clip and he weaves the people in and out of the narrative very deftly. This is one of those special non-fiction books for me that totally pulls you in, teaches you, and entertains you all at the same time. He presents the facts as facts and only rarely does he put forward his opinion but the facts often speak for themselves quite clearly. There is a section on whataboutism that should be required reading for everyone in this country. He refuses to give in to it and presents the facts of each atrocity as a discrete event which is how they should be viewed. I also came away more and more convinced that ANY extreme dogma, in this case either religion or nationalism, leads to trouble. We all need to try and find common ground and work out compromises. That is NOT a dirty word! Once you have determined that your view is absolutely right and nothing can move you from that, then you have given yourself the right to do anything in furtherance of it. As he so eloquently puts it, "even if one were to concede, for the sake of argument, that [person committed an offense], there is no moral universe in which her murder and disappearance should be justified." Indeed. There is a great turn of phrase in the book about the "derangement of bigotry" and boy are we seeing that in this country right now. This is a also a great book for looking at the way people change and evolve over time, and how time and distance affect memory and emotion. I can see why this book ended up on so many best of lists for last year. I also would love to see it presented as a documentary series at some point. ( )
  MarkMad | Jul 14, 2021 |
Truly fascinating. Did not know too much about Jean McConville (kidnap and murder victim) nor did I know much about Dolores Page and her sister Marian (Dolores was married to Stephen Rea the actor and a member of the IRA. Was arrested for bombing in London and went on a year long hunger strike with her sister). I listened to this on Audible and found myself telling everyone about this book. I couldn't stop talking about it. Just gave it to a family member recovering from surgery.

Dad, you would have loved this book. ( )
  scoene | Jul 13, 2021 |
A page-turner account of the Troubles through personal histories. The unifying theme is who killed Jean McConville, the mother of 10 taken by the IRA who never returned. Her story, what happened to her and her children, left to fend for themselves as their neighbors basically shunned them is the thread through which the story of the Troubles unfolds, weaving in more well-known figures, such as Gerry Adams, Brendan Hughes, and the Price sisters. Integrated in the narrative is Boston College's Belfast Project, a collection of personal stories from former paramilitaries (from both sides) that were supposed to be revealed only after the protagonists were dead.
A very engaging read precisely because the "whatever happened to Jean McConville" gives humanity to a narrative that is otherwise quite bleak. but also integrates the depth of trauma for both victims and perpetrators. ( )
  SocProf9740 | Jul 11, 2021 |
I will be surprised if this book does not win some literary awards. It details the decades-long violent conflict in Northern Ireland (a/k/a The Troubles) between the Protestant majority, the Catholic minority, and the British. The book is very well-researched with 75? pages of annotated footnotes, but suffers some in my opinion, from the introduction of too many people, in an attempt to be all-inclusive. There are essentially four main characters: Jean McConville (mother of ten, who is one of the Disappeared), Dolours Price, Brendan Hughes, and Gerry Adams, the latter three all pivotal, larger-than-life members of the IRA. Told mostly in a chronological manner, there are many themes of dedication, betrayal, retribution, etc. and the eventual peace process, culminating in the Good Friday Agreement (a/k/a Got Fuck All to the militant faction) and Gerry Adams complete denial of his leadership role in the IRA. I especially liked the reveals about the spies for each group, and the legal battle over the Belfast Project at Boston College, which secretly interviewed over 100 participants in the IRA and the Ulster Volunteer Force, where confidentiality was promised until all the participants were deceased. ( )
  skipstern | Jul 11, 2021 |
"All wars are fought twice, the first time on the battlefield, the second time in memory." - Vietnam Thanh Nguyen (as quoted in Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland)

Growing up in Canada has afforded me a comfortable life thus far, void of wars or societal conflict. A few minutes in front of any newscast will remind me of how fortunate I was to have won the birth lottery and had my start in a land with such opportunity, tolerance, and freedom. None of this would be even possible had my maternal grandfather’s parents not left Ballymena (in the North of Ireland) and immigrated to Ontario, Canada, near the beginning of the last century.

As politics and global conflict were topics omitted from the Sunday dinner table, I was mostly unaware of the history that plagued the place of my ancestry. Although never grasping the gravity of the situation, I remember watching the twisted expressions of anguish that would blanket my grandfather as he read through the papers and contemplated the fate of his left-behind relatives. As a young lass with no concept of sectarian strife, I chalked it up as one of those terrible things that happen in another part of the world, far away from the peaceful lands I inhabited.

Now that I’ve matured and grown less self-involved, I have become engrossed in the struggle that English Colonialism has imposed on the world for centuries. I crave answers to why the Irish were turned against one another, as I struggle to understand how this Christian conflict could result in the partition of her lands.

In Say Nothing, Patrick Radden Keefe lays out a nail-biting recount of the three-decades-long dissidence that eventually ended in the Good Friday Agreement on April 10th, 1998 (in my 22nd year). I would recommend this courageous book to anyone, Irish or not, for the opportunity to bear witness to the terror that loomed over those devastating years.

The spotlight of the narrative was on the Irish Republicans and their leaders, soldiers, and struggle, while the Loyalists were the elusive 'other' side, grouped with the British soldiers. While I can certainly understand this framing, I would have liked to hear more from the Protestants in fairness to the fullness of the story. However, the code of silence amongst the paramilitaries may have rendered their version impossible to hear.

Given the secret nature of The Troubles, it's a wonder that so many were willing to discuss those dark days at all. If not for the recordings procured for future academic study, at the Boston University, by a reformed Republican insider, Radden Keefe would not have been able to write this book, at least not as extensively.

Just the rumour of someone speaking about the atrocities of those years could mean certain death. There was no place for disloyalty in the eyes of the Provisional IRA, real or perceived, as Jean McConville and her ten children were to find out when she was abducted from her kitchen table, never to be returned.

Throughout Say Nothing, Radden Keefe chronicles the orphaned children's search for their mother, and it is the deafening silence of so many that rang the loudest for me. Fear of reprisal shrouded civilians and members alike in fear, which kept their mouths sealed. It was mortifying to read how a weapon in the humiliation arsenal of the Provos was to tar and feather women they deemed traitorous. The minor act of offering a pillow to a British soldier who lay dying in front of their door, as was the crime of Jean McConville, could incur lethal wrath.

‘In the febrile atmosphere of wartime Belfast, for a local woman to be seen consorting with a British soldier could be a dangerous thing. Some women who were suspected of such transgressions were subjected to an antique mode of ritual humiliation: tarring and feathering. A mob would accost such women, forcibly shave their heads, anoint them with warm and sticky black tar, then shower a pillowcaseful of dirty feathers over their heads and chain them by the neck to a lamppost, like a dog, so that the whole community could observe the spectacle of their indignity.’

Of course, scenes like this, plus countless other rationale laid bare within the history of the conflict, are the reasons why they said nothing. For some, the silent torture of daily terrorism ended up culminating in Belfast Syndrome, or what we now refer to as PTSD. No matter which side of the divide these stunned women found themselves on, they survived by being fed sedatives to drown out the sounds of firebombs and screaming children whilst white-knuckling it through their days, in prayer to the same God.

‘Doctors found, paradoxically, that the people most prone to this type of anxiety were not the active combatants, who were on the street and had a sense of agency, but the women and children stuck sheltering behind closed doors.’

Reading of the deadly bombing campaigns issued by the paramilitaries, where many innocents ended up casualties, left me feeling nauseous. How terrifying it must have been to live with these cruelties in one's everyday life, sometimes even at your front door.

Prior to the British construction of the Long Kesh correctional facility on the premises of an aircraft base 12 miles outside of Belfast, internees were incarcerated on a floating prison: The (Her Majesty’s Prison) HMP Maidstone. This 500-foot ship had been used decades before, during WW2, and was described as a hell-hole, “not fit for pigs." However, it was mainly Nationalist soldiers kept in these inhumane conditions, since, although terrorism was asserted by the Loyalists as well, they didn’t seem to be a target for capture; almost as if their brand of criminality was useful to Scotland Yard.

‘Just before dawn one morning in August 1971, three thousand British troops descended on nationalist areas across Northern Ireland…. Of the 350 suspects arrested that day, not a single one was a Loyalist…. The disparity in treatment only compounded the impression, in the minds of many Catholics, that the army was simply another instrument of sectarian oppression.’

We learnt about the tenacious spirit that saw various Republicans partake in lengthy internments and fatal hunger strikes, but, as noble as one might wish to see the Republicans, they had a longstanding tradition of failure that weighed heavily on the cause.

‘It was almost as if “defeat suited them better than victory,” in the words of one historian, “for there was a sense in which Irish Republicanism thrived on oppression and the isolated exclusivity that came with it.”

A glaring irony found within Say Nothing is the large chunk of the last half of the book being devoted to Republican touts: double agents or betrayers. British Military intelligence estimated that by the end of The Troubles, 1 in 4 members was some type of an informant, with senior members nearing 1 in 2. You should take anything they report with a grain (or twenty) of salt, though, as this would be a helpful way to fabricate and disparage the loyalty of the Nationalists.

Fortunately for the masses, with the assistance of the Clinton government and the new British Prime Minister, Tony Blair, a final cease-fire was signed in 1997. Finally, there was a halt to the thirty-year tribal conflict, and The Good Friday Agreement was born.

‘Northern Ireland would remain part of the United Kingdom, but with its own devolved assembly and close links to the Republic of Ireland. The agreement acknowledged that the majority of people on the island wanted a united Ireland – but also that a majority of people in the six counties favoured remaining part of the United Kingdom. The key principle was “consent”: if, at some juncture, a majority of the people in the North wanted to unite with Ireland, then the governments of the UK and Ireland would have a “binding obligation” to honor that choice.’

As glorious as it is that the violence has stopped and people have forged ahead with a tolerance unseen in previous years, when I picture the Emerald Isle, I see her emaciated shadow as I pine for the fullness of what she could have been. Ireland’s soul lacks nourishment; hers, a people who have suffered through debilitating famine, only to live to fight injustice via hunger strike. Until the ravenous fangs of British gluttony are unclenched, she will remain detached, and starving for freedom.

Please visit my peachybooks.ca blog post for this review here:https://peachybooks.ca/2021/07/05/review-say-nothing-by-patrick-radden-keefe/, where you can watch for the companion post I will be publishing, showcasing the murals found in the North, depicting the conflict ( )
  PeachyBooksCA | Jul 5, 2021 |
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Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Keefe, Patrick RaddenAutorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Archetti, StefanoArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Blaney, MatthewNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Carella, MariaDesignerautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Clévy, Claire-MarieTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Gil, RicardTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Munday, OliverDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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Jean McConville was thirty-eight when she disappeared, and she had spent nearly half of her life either pregnant or recovering from childbirth.
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""Meticulously reported, exquisitely written, and grippingly told, Say Nothing is a work of revelation." --David Grann, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Killers of the Flower Moon From award-winning New Yorker staff writer Patrick Radden Keefe, a stunning, intricate narrative about a notorious killing in Northern Ireland and its devastating repercussions In December 1972, Jean McConville, a thirty-eight-year-old mother of ten, was dragged from her Belfast home by masked intruders, her children clinging to her legs. They never saw her again. Her abduction was one of the most notorious episodes of the vicious conflict known as The Troubles. Everyone in the neighborhood knew the I.R.A. was responsible. But in a climate of fear and paranoia, no one would speak of it. In 2003, five years after an accord brought an uneasy peace to Northern Ireland, a set of human bones was discovered on a beach. McConville's children knew it was their mother when they were told a blue safety pin was attached to the dress--with so many kids, McConville always kept it handy for diapers or ripped clothes. Patrick Radden Keefe's mesmerizing book on the bitter conflict in Northern Ireland and its aftermath uses the McConville case as a starting point for the tale of a society wracked by a violent guerrilla war, a war whose consequences have never been reckoned with. The brutal violence seared not only people like the McConville children, but also I.R.A. members embittered by a peace that fell far short of the goal of a united Ireland, and left them wondering whether the killings they committed were not justified acts of war, but simple murders. From radical and impetuous I.R.A. terrorists--or volunteers, depending on which side one was on--such as Dolours Price, who, when she was barely out of her teens, was already planting bombs in London and targeting informers for execution, to the ferocious I.R.A. mastermind known as The Dark, to the spy games and dirty schemes of the British Army, to Gerry Adams, who negotiated the peace and denied his I.R.A. past, betraying his hardcore comrades--Say Nothing conjures a world of passion, betrayal, vengeance, and anguish"--"A narrative about a notorious killing that took place in Northern Ireland during The Troubles and its devastating repercussions to this day"--

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