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No digas nada / Say Nothing: A True Story of…
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No digas nada / Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern… (edição: 2020)

de Patrick Radden Keefe (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1,1745512,339 (4.4)108
""Meticulously reported, exquisitely written, and grippingly told, Say Nothing is a work of revelation." --David Grann, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Killers of the Flower Moon From award-winning New Yorker staff writer Patrick Radden Keefe, a stunning, intricate narrative about a notorious killing in Northern Ireland and its devastating repercussions In December 1972, Jean McConville, a thirty-eight-year-old mother of ten, was dragged from her Belfast home by masked intruders, her children clinging to her legs. They never saw her again. Her abduction was one of the most notorious episodes of the vicious conflict known as The Troubles. Everyone in the neighborhood knew the I.R.A. was responsible. But in a climate of fear and paranoia, no one would speak of it. In 2003, five years after an accord brought an uneasy peace to Northern Ireland, a set of human bones was discovered on a beach. McConville's children knew it was their mother when they were told a blue safety pin was attached to the dress--with so many kids, McConville always kept it handy for diapers or ripped clothes. Patrick Radden Keefe's mesmerizing book on the bitter conflict in Northern Ireland and its aftermath uses the McConville case as a starting point for the tale of a society wracked by a violent guerrilla war, a war whose consequences have never been reckoned with. The brutal violence seared not only people like the McConville children, but also I.R.A. members embittered by a peace that fell far short of the goal of a united Ireland, and left them wondering whether the killings they committed were not justified acts of war, but simple murders. From radical and impetuous I.R.A. terrorists--or volunteers, depending on which side one was on--such as Dolours Price, who, when she was barely out of her teens, was already planting bombs in London and targeting informers for execution, to the ferocious I.R.A. mastermind known as The Dark, to the spy games and dirty schemes of the British Army, to Gerry Adams, who negotiated the peace and denied his I.R.A. past, betraying his hardcore comrades--Say Nothing conjures a world of passion, betrayal, vengeance, and anguish"--"A narrative about a notorious killing that took place in Northern Ireland during The Troubles and its devastating repercussions to this day"--… (mais)
Membro:juanillo76
Título:No digas nada / Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland (Reservoir Narrativa) (Spanish Edition)
Autores:Patrick Radden Keefe (Autor)
Informação:Reservoir Books (2020), Edition: 1, 624 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca, Favoritos
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Detalhes da Obra

Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland de Patrick Radden Keefe (Author)

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» Veja também 108 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 55 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Excellent read. It fleshed out the picture I had of the troubles. What it took for a hard core group of individuals to fight the British and the RUC for 30 years. Why it happened and how it aloly stopped and what it did to the people who fought. Couldn't put it down. ( )
  JBreedlove | May 4, 2021 |
Jean McConnel is disappeared, who is responsible? A story of the Irish Triubles from Bloody Sunday to the present day slowly reveals the truth and the staggering truth of the Irish civil war in North Ireland: loyalists bs unionist. At time confusing, brutal and ultimately morally suspect. Major characters are Hughes and Gerry Adams co leaders of the Provos or provisional IRA. Another story line is Delores and Marian ? Sisters who are radicalized, imprisoned and stage hunger strikes. The book made me rethink past and current political standards and how we achieve them through lies and manipulation. ( )
  bblum | Apr 27, 2021 |
Best for:
Anyone who appreciates excellent investigative reporting, people who are intrigued by true crime, anyone who is interested in the Troubles.

In a nutshell:
Investigative journalist Keefe uses the disappearance of widow and mother of 10 Jean McConville in the early 70s to explore the Troubles, focusing primarily on the Republican fight.

Worth quoting:
N/A (Audio book)

Why I chose it:
I find the Troubles to be an absolutely fascinating part of history. And they are being discussed a bit more often now, as the Good Friday Agreement is at risk due to Brexit.

Review:
For some reason, I have always found Ireland to be interesting. I’ve visited the Republic multiple times, and also spent time in the North, including in Belfast and Derry, where I visited the Museum of Free Derry (https://museumoffreederry.org/). I was even accepted to a Masters program in Belfast where I planned to focus my studies on The Troubles, though ultimately I chose another path. I’ve read many books on the topic, and most have been emotive and intriguing, but none have been as well-written and fascinating as this one.

The book feels almost like a crime novel, but it’s about real people. Jane McConville was a widow with ten children, living in the Catholic area of Belfast in the early 1970s, when a group came and took her away. She was never seen again. Her story is the through-line we keep revisiting as Keefe explores some of the major players in the Republican fight for Irish independence in the North of Ireland. Dolours Price is the other main focus of the book, and her story of serving in the violent Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) is much of what keeps the book together.

Keefe explores how Price enlisted in the Provisional IRA (membership in which was and remains a crime) and carried out attacks, including the bombings in London in March 1973, and then engaged in a hunger strike after her conviction in an attempt to be recognized as a political prisoner and returned to Ireland. Keefe follows Gerry Adams as well, who has always claimed he was never a member of the IRA, but who clearly was very high up within the organization.

The book explores how the IRA disappeared some individuals, such as Jane McConville, and the impact that had on their families. But it also looks at the evolution of the movement from a violent one to one that embraced politics, through to the Good Friday Agreement of 1998. It then asks the question - what now? Price herself asks that question repeatedly, as she wonders what everything she did in her youth meant, given that the North of Ireland remains part of the UK.

Another intriguing part of the book is how the Belfast Project, which was housed at Boston College, plays a part in solving the McConville mystery. The Project was where individuals secretly recorded their experiences of the Troubles, with the promise that their recordings wouldn’t be released until after their deaths (spoiler: that didn’t happen). The goal was to build an archive of recollections before those with first-hand knowledge died.

I got the audio book version, and it was nearly 15 hours long but ultimately worth it, though I think a physical version would be just as good. Keefe is brilliant at spinning together tons of information without losing his reader.

Keep it / Pass to a Friend / Donate it / Toss it:
Keep it ( )
  ASKelmore | Mar 12, 2021 |
This is an interesting book for interesting reasons. In essence, this is a book about "The Troubles," the conflict in Northern Ireland, beginning in the latter part of the 1960s and ending, theoretically, with the Good Friday Agreement of 1998, though, the book most definitely goes beyond that date in its coverage. I've heard the author speak about how he got his first interest in what he ended up writing about, because his father had taught him the value of reading the obituaries for a source of interesting stories. (My phrasing, not the author's.) He finds himself one day reading the obituary of one of the main characters in this book, and he's off to quite an adventure of investigative journalism. The author begins the book, first with a quick intro to a women of about ten children being taken by force one evening from her home -- and never seen again -- and second, with a story about a secret archive in Boston College in which law enforcement from outside America comes and takes much of it away by court order. So, dear reader, our interest is immediately peaked, and off the author goes. Certainly, there is the requisite background information about the United Kingdom and Ireland and the political no-man's-land of The Troubles that is more properly referred to as Northern Ireland. But the general background very quickly gets to be specific information about organizations, counter-organizations, city neighborhoods, country boundaries, and people passing back and forth across those boundaries, and a plethora of memorable characters, none of which are made up but all too real. In thinking back about those many players in this story, I realize there really are no extraneous parts. Small roles at one point come back to play important roles later, some times very important ones. And there really are no red herrings in this mystery theater production. It all seems to count somehow. And if that's not enough, the author has this amazing tone that he sets for the whole shebang. Utter indifference. Okay, maybe that's not quite the right terminology. Somber? No. Matter of fact? Not quite. Humorless? Oh, definitely. I could imagine the author being that guy who just happens to be on a city street corner when an accident or an incident occurs that doesn't involve the guy in the least, but he just happens to have been there and watched what happened and then is tasked with telling the authorities what he saw. And all the while, you, the reader, know that he spent hours upon hours accomplishing that "I just happened to be here and see what happened" narration. A really fascinating book for fascinating reasons. ( )
  larryerick | Jan 30, 2021 |
Well written and fascinating look at The Troubles of Northern Ireland especially during the '60's and 70's. Principal members of the IRA such as the Price sisters, Delours and Marian, who barely out of their teens became terrorists, were imprisoned, endured hunger strikes, and led lives of extreme frustration. The action, Stephen Rea married Delours and is also a key player in the story. So many names that were on the news.

The Protestant/Catholic divide is seen in light of the support or resistance to British rule. There's a lot of history here and a broad look at what happens when people refuse to cooperate and compromise. Gerry Adams, definitely an IRA member, who refuses to acknowledge his involvement becomes the political leader of Sinn Fein. The struggle within the IRA between different factions, the spying, the violence, the blind loyalties are all a part of this story.

The story opens and ends with the kidnapping and murder of a widowed mother of ten children in Belfast. Was she an informer? Who killed her? The rule of "say nothing" remains hard fast. Also interesting was a project called the Boston Project in which Boston College held the oral histories of many of the people involved in so much of the violence. Totally fascinating book - easy to read and follow. ( )
  maryreinert | Jan 11, 2021 |
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» Adicionar outros autores (2 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Keefe, Patrick RaddenAutorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Archetti, StefanoArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Blaney, MatthewNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Carella, MariaDesignerautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Clévy, Claire-MarieTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Gil, RicardTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Munday, OliverDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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The John J. Burns Library occupies a grand neo-Gothic building on the leafy campus of Boston College.  (Prologue)
Jean McConville was thirty-eight when she disappeared, and she had spent nearly half of her life either pregnant or recovering from childbirth.
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""Meticulously reported, exquisitely written, and grippingly told, Say Nothing is a work of revelation." --David Grann, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Killers of the Flower Moon From award-winning New Yorker staff writer Patrick Radden Keefe, a stunning, intricate narrative about a notorious killing in Northern Ireland and its devastating repercussions In December 1972, Jean McConville, a thirty-eight-year-old mother of ten, was dragged from her Belfast home by masked intruders, her children clinging to her legs. They never saw her again. Her abduction was one of the most notorious episodes of the vicious conflict known as The Troubles. Everyone in the neighborhood knew the I.R.A. was responsible. But in a climate of fear and paranoia, no one would speak of it. In 2003, five years after an accord brought an uneasy peace to Northern Ireland, a set of human bones was discovered on a beach. McConville's children knew it was their mother when they were told a blue safety pin was attached to the dress--with so many kids, McConville always kept it handy for diapers or ripped clothes. Patrick Radden Keefe's mesmerizing book on the bitter conflict in Northern Ireland and its aftermath uses the McConville case as a starting point for the tale of a society wracked by a violent guerrilla war, a war whose consequences have never been reckoned with. The brutal violence seared not only people like the McConville children, but also I.R.A. members embittered by a peace that fell far short of the goal of a united Ireland, and left them wondering whether the killings they committed were not justified acts of war, but simple murders. From radical and impetuous I.R.A. terrorists--or volunteers, depending on which side one was on--such as Dolours Price, who, when she was barely out of her teens, was already planting bombs in London and targeting informers for execution, to the ferocious I.R.A. mastermind known as The Dark, to the spy games and dirty schemes of the British Army, to Gerry Adams, who negotiated the peace and denied his I.R.A. past, betraying his hardcore comrades--Say Nothing conjures a world of passion, betrayal, vengeance, and anguish"--"A narrative about a notorious killing that took place in Northern Ireland during The Troubles and its devastating repercussions to this day"--

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