Página inicialGruposDiscussãoExplorarZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Ja deu uma olhada em SantaThing, a tradição de oferta de prendas do LibraryThing?
dispensar
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Carregando...

Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland

de Patrick Radden Keefe

Outros autores: Veja a seção outros autores.

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1,4047310,223 (4.43)112
""Meticulously reported, exquisitely written, and grippingly told, Say Nothing is a work of revelation." --David Grann, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Killers of the Flower Moon From award-winning New Yorker staff writer Patrick Radden Keefe, a stunning, intricate narrative about a notorious killing in Northern Ireland and its devastating repercussions In December 1972, Jean McConville, a thirty-eight-year-old mother of ten, was dragged from her Belfast home by masked intruders, her children clinging to her legs. They never saw her again. Her abduction was one of the most notorious episodes of the vicious conflict known as The Troubles. Everyone in the neighborhood knew the I.R.A. was responsible. But in a climate of fear and paranoia, no one would speak of it. In 2003, five years after an accord brought an uneasy peace to Northern Ireland, a set of human bones was discovered on a beach. McConville's children knew it was their mother when they were told a blue safety pin was attached to the dress--with so many kids, McConville always kept it handy for diapers or ripped clothes. Patrick Radden Keefe's mesmerizing book on the bitter conflict in Northern Ireland and its aftermath uses the McConville case as a starting point for the tale of a society wracked by a violent guerrilla war, a war whose consequences have never been reckoned with. The brutal violence seared not only people like the McConville children, but also I.R.A. members embittered by a peace that fell far short of the goal of a united Ireland, and left them wondering whether the killings they committed were not justified acts of war, but simple murders. From radical and impetuous I.R.A. terrorists--or volunteers, depending on which side one was on--such as Dolours Price, who, when she was barely out of her teens, was already planting bombs in London and targeting informers for execution, to the ferocious I.R.A. mastermind known as The Dark, to the spy games and dirty schemes of the British Army, to Gerry Adams, who negotiated the peace and denied his I.R.A. past, betraying his hardcore comrades--Say Nothing conjures a world of passion, betrayal, vengeance, and anguish"--"A narrative about a notorious killing that took place in Northern Ireland during The Troubles and its devastating repercussions to this day"--… (mais)
Adicionado recentemente pora.c.jones1990, julko, egb22, treedavis, delthom, GaryLoveHistory, Ronnil, Morendil, kimkimkim, biblioteca privada
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 112 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 73 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
I knew some of the subject matter of this book beforehand. Some recollection of events from the news when it happened decades ago. In 2019 we saw the Broadway production of The Ferryman which compellingly dramaticised how the Troubles and issues with the Disappeared could pull a family apart.
And now this. Compellingly narrated by Matthew Blaney. I liked how the book focused on relating events by its focus following a few major characters. But the horrors and agony and fear pitting family against family and neighbor against neighbor.
This certainly contributes to my understanding of events. Some other reviews address it as one sided; I don’t know enough to address that, so I’ll need to educate myself more. But at this point it’s harrowing enough that some who committed unspeakable acts back then were left to wonder, given that their goals were never achieved, whether they acted as agents of change or as mere criminals. ( )
  jimgosailing | Nov 18, 2021 |
Highly recommended. Keefe does a wonderful job of delivering an impartial account of The Troubles and the evolution of the "conflict" (as the English insist on labelling their occupation) through the stories of several key figures, notably Gerry Adams who really seems like a sociopath to me now that I understand the backstory and I get why my father disliked him.. ( )
  fionaanne | Nov 11, 2021 |
Patrick Radden Keefe's book captures the history of the Troubles as told through the stories of the individuals involved in the events of the days from the nineteen-seventies till our current age. The narrative starts and ends with the story of a young widow named Jean McConville and her ten children. Her story provided the backbone for a series of vignettes and set pieces that held my interest from beginning to the end. It was a story of secrets and violence, both loyalty and betrayals, and events that stretched from the neighborhoods of Belfast to Boston in America and to the Houses of Parliament in London.

The structure of the book with its variety of characters and interrelated events provided a sort of motion that mimicked the changes in the fortunes of the actual participants involved in these events. I enjoyed the set pieces as well as the detail of the lives of the important players with names like Gerry Adams, Brendan Hughes, and the Price sisters; but I also appreciated the stories, sometimes horrific, of the less well-known persons, especially the children of Jean McConville who were shuttled off to institutions after Jean was "disappeared".

Whether the narrative was describing the famous bombings in London, the "hunger strikes" of the Price sisters and others, or the secret documentary "Belfast Project" at Boston College, the author seamlessly tied the incidents, events, and characters together into a riveting story that I found simply fascinating.

No matter how much you may remember about these events, that is if you are of an age like mine that lived through this history as current events, I expect that you will read this history with amazement, similar to mine, at the details that the author puts on display. The book successfully portrayed many intimate moments while conveying history on a grand scale. ( )
  jwhenderson | Nov 1, 2021 |
Going into this book, I was not entirely unfamiliar with the Troubles in that I knew it was a time period and a conflict that took place in Ireland. Beyond that however, I was entirely uninformed on the topic. I am an American and detailed Irish history is not really part of our curriculum. This book was a fascinating and devastating look at this time period and the actual individual lives that were affected by this struggle.

Though this is not just a history of the troubles, Keefe does an excellent job familiarizing the reading with the conflict before diving into explorations of specific individual experiences. When discussing this book with my parents they talked about how they remember seeing some of the events described on the news. I was not alive during most of the events described in this book or I was very young. But, even though I did not remember any of these events actually occurring, I never felt lost or confused about the timeline of events.

I think Keefe being an Irish-American author helped with the telling of this story as it gave him a more distanced view of the events and allowed him to tell the events and the beliefs of the Irish republicans neutrally. I am not someone who thinks that journalists or authors always need to be completely neutral in the topics they cover but when discussing such as fraught issue as the one described in this book where people will naturally disagree on on I think it's good for the author to leave their own opinions at the door. There will never be a time in which people will all agree on whether revolts or protests that involve violence are necessary. Some people will look at instances of government violence or oppression and say that the only way to reach an outcome they want is to respond with violence. Others will say violence has no place in struggles against oppression and using violence is counterproductive. By not communicating his own stance, Keefe allows readers to form opinions on the Troubles and the violence within that conflict for themselves.

I think this book is an excellent model for nonfiction storytelling and was absolutely an incredible resource for myself to learn more about this period of Irish history. ( )
  AKBouterse | Oct 14, 2021 |
I took this book on vacation with me, along with a pile of others. Nothing else got read until I finished this. It is that gripping, it is that good.

I will say, it was not what I expected. Looking at and reading the cover, you would assume it was a murder mystery. That person on the cover is the criminal. Not.

[a:Patrick Radden Keefe|197852|Patrick Radden Keefe|https://images.gr-assets.com/authors/1538163619p2/197852.jpg] does tell us the story of a murder, but wrapped in the story are the awful events of the Troubles in Ireland. Is this person on the cover a criminal? Or is she just another victim of the violence and religious persecution that enveloped Ireland? A week after finishing, I personally have still not made up mind.

There was a discomforting sense in Belfast that there was no place where you were truly secure: you would run inside to get away from a gun battle, only to run outside again for fear of a bomb.

I was a young teen in the 70's when I began reading the newspapers and seeing the story's of the bombings and killing in Ireland. At that time I really did not understand the cause. As I got a little older, I knew it was about beliefs, freedom and religion-by then I did not let it bother me. It did not have an effect on my world, typical callous teen/young adult attitude.

[a: Keefe|197852|Patrick Radden Keefe|https://images.gr-assets.com/authors/1538163619p2/197852.jpg] gives both sides of the conflict fair and equal time in the narrative. The book begins and ends with story of"the disappeared" and leaves you still debating who was right and who was wrong? So much killing and sadness, it is becoming more clear to me neither side won anything but heartaches and grief. ( )
  JBroda | Sep 24, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 73 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha

» Adicionar outros autores (2 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Keefe, Patrick RaddenAutorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Archetti, StefanoArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Blaney, MatthewNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Carella, MariaDesignerautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Clévy, Claire-MarieTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Gil, RicardTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Munday, OliverDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

Pertence à série publicada

Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Lugares importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Eventos importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
All wars are fought twice, the first time on the battlefield, the second time in memory.

-- Viet Thanh Nguyen
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
TO LUCIAN AND FELIX
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
JULY 2013

The John J. Burns Library occupies a grand neo-Gothic building on the leafy campus of Boston College.  (Prologue)
Jean McConville was thirty-eight when she disappeared, and she had spent nearly half of her life either pregnant or recovering from childbirth.
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Clique para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Idioma original
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em Francês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
CDD/MDS canônico
Canonical LCC

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

""Meticulously reported, exquisitely written, and grippingly told, Say Nothing is a work of revelation." --David Grann, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Killers of the Flower Moon From award-winning New Yorker staff writer Patrick Radden Keefe, a stunning, intricate narrative about a notorious killing in Northern Ireland and its devastating repercussions In December 1972, Jean McConville, a thirty-eight-year-old mother of ten, was dragged from her Belfast home by masked intruders, her children clinging to her legs. They never saw her again. Her abduction was one of the most notorious episodes of the vicious conflict known as The Troubles. Everyone in the neighborhood knew the I.R.A. was responsible. But in a climate of fear and paranoia, no one would speak of it. In 2003, five years after an accord brought an uneasy peace to Northern Ireland, a set of human bones was discovered on a beach. McConville's children knew it was their mother when they were told a blue safety pin was attached to the dress--with so many kids, McConville always kept it handy for diapers or ripped clothes. Patrick Radden Keefe's mesmerizing book on the bitter conflict in Northern Ireland and its aftermath uses the McConville case as a starting point for the tale of a society wracked by a violent guerrilla war, a war whose consequences have never been reckoned with. The brutal violence seared not only people like the McConville children, but also I.R.A. members embittered by a peace that fell far short of the goal of a united Ireland, and left them wondering whether the killings they committed were not justified acts of war, but simple murders. From radical and impetuous I.R.A. terrorists--or volunteers, depending on which side one was on--such as Dolours Price, who, when she was barely out of her teens, was already planting bombs in London and targeting informers for execution, to the ferocious I.R.A. mastermind known as The Dark, to the spy games and dirty schemes of the British Army, to Gerry Adams, who negotiated the peace and denied his I.R.A. past, betraying his hardcore comrades--Say Nothing conjures a world of passion, betrayal, vengeance, and anguish"--"A narrative about a notorious killing that took place in Northern Ireland during The Troubles and its devastating repercussions to this day"--

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Autor LibraryThing

Patrick Radden Keefe é um Autor LibraryThing, um autor que lista a sua biblioteca pessoal na LibraryThing.

página do perfil | página de autor

Capas populares

Links rápidos

Avaliação

Média: (4.43)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 2
2.5 1
3 15
3.5 10
4 136
4.5 44
5 170

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 164,311,077 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível