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How to Fracture a Fairy Tale de Jane Yolen
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How to Fracture a Fairy Tale (edição: 2018)

de Jane Yolen (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1169181,375 (3.93)4
"This collection is Jane Yolen at her best. This is magic."--Patricia C. Wrede, author of the Enchanted Forest Chronicles Fantasy icon Jane Yolen (The Devil's Arithmetic, Briar Rose, Sister Emily's Lightship) is adored by generations of readers of all ages. Now she triumphantly returns with this inspired gathering of fractured fairy tales and legends. Yolen breaks open the classics to reveal their crystalline secrets: a philosophical bridge that misses its troll, a spinner of straw as a falsely accused moneylender, the villainous wolf adjusting poorly to retirement. Each of these offerings features a new author note and original poem, illuminating tales that are old, new, and brilliantly refined.… (mais)
Membro:nohwhere_man
Título:How to Fracture a Fairy Tale
Autores:Jane Yolen (Autor)
Informação:Tachyon Publications (2018), 320 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
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How to Fracture a Fairy Tale de Jane Yolen

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Mostrando 1-5 de 9 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
I jumped at the chance to read this early. I love all fairy tales, even those who have been re-imagined with new endings. Jane Yolen is a masterful storyteller and keeps the stories dark yet charming which is a difficult balance. There are stories from Hans Christian Anderson and the Brothers Grimm, Native American stories, Greek Mythology, Japanese folk tales, Celtic mythology and more.

They remind of the old Fractured Fairy Tales. There is a Snow White located in West Virginia and many other tales from around the world. I read an advance copy on my kindle and I’m pre-ordering it to add it into our geography studies. ( )
  JennyNau10 | Dec 7, 2019 |
I often enjoy Jane Yolen's fairy tales in other anthologies, and they are very good amongst the genre, but I struggled to keep motivated to finish all the stories in this book. I often have that problem with short story collections, finding that I'd rather read one or two here and there, spread out over years until I've read them all. This is especially the case when the stories all have the same feel.

I can't say exactly what makes these stories all feel the same to me. I read about half, maybe more, and there are different themes, tones, and effects, but overall just felt a little ploddingly the same. Maybe it's the narrative voice and Yolen's personal vocabulary all running together? I didn't dislike any of them, I just gradually found my reading pace slowing down (I excitedly devoured the first few! because I love fairy tale retellings!) until it was due back at the library and I just couldn't believe that I would finish before the next due date if I renewed the checkout.

Something that I did dislike about the book - but not the stories themselves - is the conceit of "fractured tales" and pairing each previously-published story with a little history or anecdote related to it and a poem that may or may not be directly related to the story. This is fine, but many of the little add-ons made me wonder why Yolen bothered, and why I bothered flipping to the back of the book to refer to them. Maybe it would have made more sense to put the add-ons directly after the related story, instead of sticking them all in the appendix. Maybe putting them in the appendix was so they'd be easier to skip. I don't know.

I didn't like any of the poems I read and I didn't like the Jane Yolen I met in the little anecdotes. ( )
  keristars | May 3, 2019 |
A collection of short stories that riff, retell, and fracture fairy and folk tales from a variety of cultures and countries. Yolen is a skilled hand and the majority of these stories utterly tickled my fancy. My personal favourite was "Sleeping Ugly" in which the sleeping princess trope is revisited. I also enjoyed the notes included at the end of the volume on the origins of each of the stories (many of which have appeared in other publications or collections previously) although I could take or leave the poems included for each of these notes as I'm not a big poetry reader. Recommended if you enjoy a good fairy tale retelling. ( )
  MickyFine | Jan 18, 2019 |
Perfectly competent retellings. And what's the point. I just can't get Jane Yolen - whatever she's aiming at, it isn't my viscera. Over the years I've picked up novel after story collection laced with little poetic gems that sparkle and leave me indifferent. Competent and clever, wily even, but not to my nose, stinky gutsy. ( )
  quondame | Dec 9, 2018 |
How To Fracture a Fairytale by Jane Yolen is a collection of short stories from across the author's long career. I hadn't read anything of hers before I picked up this book, but I'd heard good things, so I was looking forward to it. Unfortunately, I did not enjoy reading this book. I got a bit over half way before I decided to give up. This was not an easy decision, but I seem to keep promising that I'll let myself DNF books and in the end I figured it was time that I just put the book down, even though it's a review copy. Since it's short stories, I will still include my individual story reviews below and a bit about why this book didn't work for me.

On the surface, these should be the kind of stories that I enjoy. For example, I am a bit fan of Angela Slatter's short stories, and a lot of those could easily be described as "fractured fairytales" (or shattered and twisted horribly...). Most of the stories in this book didn't stand up to those at all. I found most of the stories I read to be shallow and fairly bland. Some of this could be due to not standing the test of time well, but I don't think that applies to all the stories.

From the stories I did read, the best were definitely the ones drawing on Yolen's Jewish background. My favourite was "Granny Rumple", which was told in the style of a family story passed down a few generations. It had depth and feeling and more interesting characterisation than a lot of the other stories. To be fair, it was also a more lengthy story, but "Slipping Sideways Through Eternity" was short, involved the holocaust, and was also better than most of the other stories. The story I found most amusing was "The Bridge's Complaint", which was told from the point of view of the bridge and was an interesting take. The story that jarred me the most was "One Ox, Two Ox, Three Ox, and the Dragon King" which was long and just boring. I would guess that it was based on a Chinese story (and the author's afterword confirms this) but I don't see what this retelling added in terms of making an interesting story.

There were "about the story" bits at the end of the book, which I didn't read (except the one I just mentioned above, and that was only for this review) and poems which I couldn't be bothered trying, given my general exhaustion with this book. Honestly, I am going to be glad to stop seeing it in my currently reading section.

I obviously don't recommend this book. There are much better "fractured fairytales" in the world. I would recommend starting with Angela Slatter's, but she's hardly the only choice.

~

Snow in Summer — A short Snow White retelling with a more satisfying end for the stepmother.

The Bridge's Complaint — An amusing story about goats, a bridge and a troll, told from the perspective of the bridge. I rather enjoyed it.

The Moon Ribbon — A girl acquires an unpleasant step mother and step sisters (much like Cinderella) and a magic ribbon from her late mother. There is no ball but the abusive relations get what’s coming to them. A more interesting read for how far it deviates from the original.

Godmother Death — A story about Death and her godson. An enjoyable tale.

Happy Dens or A Day in the Wold Wolves' Home — A story containing three shorter stories. When Nurse Lamb goes to work at Happy Dens, where older wolves are looked after, she is at first afraid of being among all the wolves but then hears some famous fairytales from the wolves points of view and feels better about it all. It’s a story about spin — positive and negative — and how people tend to make themselves the heroes of the stories they tell. I couldn’t help but feel a bit uneasy about it. The stories told by the wolves were a bit too positive to be entirely believable (in the context of the story world)... or maybe it just hasn’t held up well in our current fake-news world.

Granny Rumple — I particularly liked this story. It’s told from Yolen’s own perspective and recounts a family story that has been passed down a few generations. The story itself is about a Jewish family, including a moneylender, living in a Ukrainian ghetto and some of their interactions with goyim. It is told as an alternate-perspective basis for the story of Rumpelstiltskin with bonus racism and a small pogrom thrown in. I feel like this story, trying to explore a similar theme of different perspectives to “Happy Dens”, does so in a much more compelling manner and I found it a much more engaging and confronting read.

One Ox, Two Ox, Three Ox, and the Dragon King — Three brothers set out to save their dying mother by retrieving a magical ring from a dragon. It wasn’t a terrible story, but it was on the long side and, ultimately, kind of unremarkable.

Brother Hart — A sad story about a pair of siblings, one of whom turns into a deer each day. I couldn’t work out which side I should be on while reading and it didn’t end happily.

Sun/Flight — I suppose this was inspired by Icarus, possibly with something else thrown in that I didn’t recognise. It didn’t really work for me. Fine, but meh.

Slipping Sideways Through Eternity — I liked this story. It’s about a modern fifteen year old who is briefly transported to 1943 by Elijah, who I gather from the story is a mythical Jewish figure.

The Foxwife — About a man and his kitsune wife, whom he treats badly once he learns of her nature. It was OK. Didn’t feel that “fractured” though.

The Faery Flag — A young laird is led into faeryland by his dog, falls in love with a faery and... it doesn’t end badly. I guess that’s subversive but it’s not sufficiently emotive to be interesting either.

One Old Man, with Seals — The story of an old lady living alone in a lighthouse and coming across an old man surrounded by seals. I wonder whether this story packs a more significant punch of the reader is familiar with the source material? I am not and what seemed like the punchline wasn’t very punchy.

Sleeping Ugly — A children’s story but an amusing remix of Sleeping Beauty. The tone worked well for this one, I thought.

The Undine — A more depressing version of The Little Mermaid? I’m not really sure what we were meant to take from this very short story.

And that was all I read. I started the next story, but just gave up in psychological exhaustion.

No star rating.

You can read more of my reviews on my blog.
1 vote Tsana | Dec 1, 2018 |
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Jane Yolenautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Meyer, MarissaIntroduçãoautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Story, ElizabethArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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"This collection is Jane Yolen at her best. This is magic."--Patricia C. Wrede, author of the Enchanted Forest Chronicles Fantasy icon Jane Yolen (The Devil's Arithmetic, Briar Rose, Sister Emily's Lightship) is adored by generations of readers of all ages. Now she triumphantly returns with this inspired gathering of fractured fairy tales and legends. Yolen breaks open the classics to reveal their crystalline secrets: a philosophical bridge that misses its troll, a spinner of straw as a falsely accused moneylender, the villainous wolf adjusting poorly to retirement. Each of these offerings features a new author note and original poem, illuminating tales that are old, new, and brilliantly refined.

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