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Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy World (edição: 2019)

de Cal Newport (Autor)

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7651821,546 (3.91)6
A New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Publishers Weekly, and USA Today bestseller "Newport is making a bid to be the Marie Kondo of technology: someone with an actual plan for helping you realize the digital pursuits that do, and don't, bring value to your life."--Ezra Klein, Vox Minimalism is the art of knowing how much is just enough. Digital minimalism applies this idea to our personal technology. It's the key to living a focused life in an increasingly noisy world. In this timely and enlightening book, the bestselling author of Deep Work introduces a philosophy for technology use that has already improved countless lives. Digital minimalists are all around us. They're the calm, happy people who can hold long conversations without furtive glances at their phones. They can get lost in a good book, a woodworking project, or a leisurely morning run. They can have fun with friends and family without the obsessive urge to document the experience. They stay informed about the news of the day, but don't feel overwhelmed by it. They don't experience "fear of missing out" because they already know which activities provide them meaning and satisfaction. Now, Newport gives us a name for this quiet movement, and makes a persuasive case for its urgency in our tech-saturated world. Common sense tips, like turning off notifications, or occasional rituals like observing a digital sabbath, don't go far enough in helping us take back control of our technological lives, and attempts to unplug completely are complicated by the demands of family, friends and work. What we need instead is a thoughtful method to decide what tools to use, for what purposes, and under what conditions. Drawing on a diverse array of real-life examples, from Amish farmers to harried parents to Silicon Valley programmers, Newport identifies the common practices of digital minimalists and the ideas that underpin them. He shows how digital minimalists are rethinking their relationship to social media, rediscovering the pleasures of the offline world, and reconnecting with their inner selves through regular periods of solitude. He then shares strategies for integrating these practices into your life, starting with a thirty-day "digital declutter" process that has already helped thousands feel less overwhelmed and more in control. Technology is intrinsically neither good nor bad. The key is using it to support your goals and values, rather than letting it use you. This book shows the way.… (mais)
Membro:RobinTG
Título:Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy World
Autores:Cal Newport (Autor)
Informação:Portfolio (2019), 304 pages
Coleções:self-improvement, Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
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Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy World de Cal Newport

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» Veja também 6 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 18 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Enlightening discussion of how technology works on us, how the businesses exploit it, and concrete strategies for taking back control. This book inspired me to strip down my iPhone further than I already had; now it's essentially a dumbphone with Google Maps and a notepad. Additionally, because of this book, I have bought the Freedom app, with the hopes of doing more constructive things with my time in front of a screen. And depending on how effective the other strategies are, this may be my last Goodreads review for a while. Don't click "like" on this post. ( )
  exhypothesi | Mar 7, 2021 |
I was more or less convinced before I picked the book up that I’m wasting too much time on social media and my ability to focus is becoming fragmented. I read this to hear his solution to this issue: Ruthlessly cutting out digital tools that don’t bring you value.

I’d consider myself, in Newport’s parlance, a digital maximalist. I have accounts on every major platform, am an early-adopter of new digital platforms, social networks, and tools, and evangelize tools I find useful. My always connected.

While I generally love this, I’ve noticed that my ability to focus for long periods of time and to sit and observe without needing a distraction (my phone) has diminished significantly. This is a problem. I value my observation abilities and don’t want to lose them. I also have so many things I want to do: Blog posts to write, spoons to carve, places to explore, etc.

How much am I missing by mindlessly scrolling through my phone?
What could I be doing instead of scrolling?
How much value am I getting from the scrolling anyway?

After reading this, I decided to do a 30 day digital declutter with my friend Chris. Currently in the middle of it right now and getting a lot done!

One thing I like about Cal Newport’s books is that they are highly skimmable. Each chapter is divided into claim and evidence, and the book as a whole is divided into the problem and the solution. If you are already convinced and want the action items, skip to Part 2. If the claims seem reasonable enough, skip the evidence and go to the next chapter. ( )
  064 | Dec 25, 2020 |
This wasn’t as revolutionary as Deep Work, and I took far fewer notes, but if you’re interested in what your life could be like with less mindless scrolling, then this is a good place to start. Newport lays out all the reasons you should consider “digital minimalism” and offers clear actions to get there. ( )
  pmichaud | Dec 21, 2020 |
Ever since I learned that people's score on an IQ drops by 15 points if they're regularly distracted during it (eg. by a phone), I've been pretty wary of my attention. 15 points of intelligence is a _big_ price to pay for anything! About a year ago I got rid of my smart phone, and downgraded back to a flip phone. It's been working pretty well for me.

Digital Minimalism is Cal Newport's take on this phenomenon, and what to do about it. It gave me some vindication that maybe I'm not crazy for not wanting to sign up for instagram. Perhaps more importantly, it discusses a significantly less-haphazard-than-mine-was approach to weening yourself off these services.

The thesis of the book is "your smartphone provides much less value than you think," but even if you already agree with that, there is value to be found in this book. Newport successfully argues that we've collectively lost the idea of active leisure and do-it-yourself-edness as a society, and suggests that these activities are a healthier substitute for mindlessly dicking around on our phones/netflix/what-have-you.

It's not Newport's best book (So Good They Can't Ignore You is), but it's worth a read.
( )
  isovector | Dec 13, 2020 |
I thought I knew what I was going to read before I started - I've read Cal's other works so I kind of knew his stance social media and related distractions. And there was a lot of that, but there were also valuable to me insights:
- Solitude deprivation as common problem - solitude defined as time spent without input from other minds;
- Value of craft (as a knitter I already knew this but was interested in how widely craft was defined and got inspired to look into other crafts);
- Advantages of planning your leisure time and creating a structure and discipline around it.

I appreciate the conciseness of the book but found myself craving more practical how-tos and anecdotes from others' experiences in adopting the various strategies discussed. ( )
  JuliaMay | Dec 11, 2020 |
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A New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Publishers Weekly, and USA Today bestseller "Newport is making a bid to be the Marie Kondo of technology: someone with an actual plan for helping you realize the digital pursuits that do, and don't, bring value to your life."--Ezra Klein, Vox Minimalism is the art of knowing how much is just enough. Digital minimalism applies this idea to our personal technology. It's the key to living a focused life in an increasingly noisy world. In this timely and enlightening book, the bestselling author of Deep Work introduces a philosophy for technology use that has already improved countless lives. Digital minimalists are all around us. They're the calm, happy people who can hold long conversations without furtive glances at their phones. They can get lost in a good book, a woodworking project, or a leisurely morning run. They can have fun with friends and family without the obsessive urge to document the experience. They stay informed about the news of the day, but don't feel overwhelmed by it. They don't experience "fear of missing out" because they already know which activities provide them meaning and satisfaction. Now, Newport gives us a name for this quiet movement, and makes a persuasive case for its urgency in our tech-saturated world. Common sense tips, like turning off notifications, or occasional rituals like observing a digital sabbath, don't go far enough in helping us take back control of our technological lives, and attempts to unplug completely are complicated by the demands of family, friends and work. What we need instead is a thoughtful method to decide what tools to use, for what purposes, and under what conditions. Drawing on a diverse array of real-life examples, from Amish farmers to harried parents to Silicon Valley programmers, Newport identifies the common practices of digital minimalists and the ideas that underpin them. He shows how digital minimalists are rethinking their relationship to social media, rediscovering the pleasures of the offline world, and reconnecting with their inner selves through regular periods of solitude. He then shares strategies for integrating these practices into your life, starting with a thirty-day "digital declutter" process that has already helped thousands feel less overwhelmed and more in control. Technology is intrinsically neither good nor bad. The key is using it to support your goals and values, rather than letting it use you. This book shows the way.

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