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Invisible Man de Ralph Ellison
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Invisible Man (original: 1952; edição: 1995)

de Ralph Ellison (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
13,705169313 (3.99)635
In the course of his wanderings from a Southern Negro college to New York's Harlem, an American black man becomes involved in a series of adventures. Introduction explains circumstances under which the book was written. Ellison won the National Book Award for this searing record of a black man's journey through contemporary America. Unquestionably, Ellison's book is a work of extraordinary intensity--powerfully imagined and written with a savage, wryly humorous gusto.… (mais)
Membro:GinaM19
Título:Invisible Man
Autores:Ralph Ellison (Autor)
Informação:Vintage Books (1995), Edition: 2nd, 581 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Detalhes da Obra

Invisible Man de Ralph Ellison (Author) (1952)

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1940s (23)
1950s (36)
My TBR (83)
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» Veja também 635 menções

Inglês (165)  Holandês (1)  Espanhol (1)  Norueguês (1)  Todos os idiomas (168)
Mostrando 1-5 de 168 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
"keep this nigger boy running"
  ritaer | Jun 6, 2021 |
Every American needs to read this book. It blows my mind that high schools do not require it! ( )
  dianahaemer | Apr 27, 2021 |
Joe Morton is a fantastic narrator. And he is perfect for this particular story.

The story, itself, is a little rambley. And that's because it's written in the first person with a narrator who is a little rambley. And not always wrapped real tight. As he learns that the world isn't as he believed, that people in power are more interested in power than in other people, it breaks him. ( )
  KittyCunningham | Apr 26, 2021 |
I quickly got caught in the current of Invisible Man, which I anticipated being more oblique and unapproachable than the text turned out to be. Ellison's dealing of the failings of the Communist part to address systemic racism was well placed. I felt overwhelmed in many ways by the story as I reflect on it.
  b.masonjudy | Mar 21, 2021 |
In our digital age we might not think anyone is invisible but if we open our eyes, we will see those that have fallen through the cracks, now think about how it was 70 years ago for those who knew they were second class citizens. Invisible Man is the only novel that Ralph Ellison published in his lifetime, but upon its publication was hailed as a masterpiece.

The narrator, an unnamed black man who lives in an underground room stealing power from the city's electric grid, reflects on the various ways in which he has experienced social invisibility during his life beginning in his teenage years in the South. Graduating from high school, he wins a scholarship to an all-black college but to receive it, he must first take part in a brutal, humiliating battle royal for the entertainment of the town's rich white dignitaries. After years later during his junior year, he chauffeurs a visiting rich white trustee for the afternoon but goes beyond the campus resulting with horrifying encounters for the trustee upon seeing the underside of black life beyond the campus. Dr. Bledsoe, the college president, excoriates the narrator and expels him through giving him false hope of re-enrolling by giving him recommendation letters to trustees in New York. After learning this, the narrator attempts to get a job at a paint factory but finds everyone suspicious of him which leads to him getting injured. While hospitalized, he is given shock therapy based on misinformation that he purposely caused the accident that injured him. After leaving the hospital, the narrator faints on the streets of Harlem and is taken in by a kindly old-fashioned woman. He later happens across the eviction of an elderly black couple and makes an impassioned speech that incites the crowd to attack the law enforcement officials in charge of the proceedings. After the narrator escapes, he is confronted by Brother Jack, the leader of a group known as "the Brotherhood" that professes its commitment to bettering conditions in Harlem and the rest of the world. At Jack's urging, the narrator agrees to join and speak at rallies to spread the word among the black community. The narrator is successful but is then called before a meeting of the Brotherhood and accused of putting his own ambitions ahead of the group, resulting in him being reassigned to another part of the city to address issues concerning women. Eventually he is told to return since his replacement has disappeared and to find him, which he does only to find him disillusioned then shot by a police officer. At the funeral, he gives a rousing speech that rallies the crowd but upsets the Brotherhood leaders due to them not having an interest in the black community’s problems. Without the narrator to help focus the community, other’s take advantage causing a riot. Getting caught up with looters, the narrator navigates the neighborhoods until he falls into an underground coal bin that he is eventually sealed in which allows him to contemplate the racism he has experienced. In the epilogue, the narrator decides to return to the world and that he is telling his story to help people see past his own invisibility and provided a voice for those with a similar plight.

I will be honest I will have to reread this book in a few years because I feel that early in the book, I was not connecting well with the narrative but that later changed especially as the narrator arrived in New York. The ‘trials and travails’ of the narrator while attempt to work at the paint factory and his treatment with the faux-Communists were eye opening given my current employment and some of the political events and or trends over the years. Ellison’s critical look at the African American societal and cultural divides in the South and the same in the North with prejudices in full display was eye opening and a reminder that to look at groups monolithically is a mistake both today and looking back at history. If I took away anything from this reading of the book, it is that.

Invisible Man is a book that needs to be read period. Ralph Ellison’s masterpiece, while I did not rate it “great” this time, is a book that I need to reread to full grasp everything going on in the narrative and appreciate its impact. ( )
1 vote mattries37315 | Feb 25, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 168 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
"Invisible Man" is tough, brutal and sensational. It is uneven in quality. But it blazes with authentic talent.
 

» Adicionar outros autores (48 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Ellison, RalphAutorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Callahan, JohnIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Ellison, RalphIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Goyert, GeorgÜbersetzerautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
James, Peter FrancisNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Morton, JoeNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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"You are saved," cried Captain Delano, more and more astonished and pained; "you are saved: what has cast such a shadow upon you?"

--Herman Melville, Benito Cereno
HARRY: I tell you, it is not me you are looking at,

Not me you arre grinning at, not me your confidential looks

Incriminate, but that other person, if person,

You thought I was: let your necrophily

Feed upon that carcase. . . .

--T. S. Eliot, Family Reunion
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"I am an invisible man. No, I am not a spook like those who haunted Edgar Allan Poe; nor am I one of your Hollywood-movie ectoplasms. I am a man of substance, of flesh and bone, fiber and liquids—and I might even be said to possess a mind. I am invisible, understand, simply because people refuse to see me. Like the bodiless heads you see sometimes in circus sideshows, it is as though I have been surrounded by mirrors of hard, distorting glass. When they approach me they see only my surroundings, themselves, or figments of their imagination—indeed, everything and anything except me."
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In the course of his wanderings from a Southern Negro college to New York's Harlem, an American black man becomes involved in a series of adventures. Introduction explains circumstances under which the book was written. Ellison won the National Book Award for this searing record of a black man's journey through contemporary America. Unquestionably, Ellison's book is a work of extraordinary intensity--powerfully imagined and written with a savage, wryly humorous gusto.

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