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Maid: Hard Work, Low Pay, and a Mother's Will to Survive (2019)

de Stephanie Land

Outros autores: Barbara Ehrenreich (Prefácio)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
6443827,664 (3.54)25
NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER Evicted meets Nickel and Dimed in Stephanie Land's memoir about working as a maid, a beautiful and gritty exploration of poverty in America. Includes a foreword by Barbara Ehrenreich. At 28, Stephanie Land's plans of breaking free from the roots of her hometown in the Pacific Northwest to chase her dreams of attending a university and becoming a writer, were cut short when a summer fling turned into an unexpected pregnancy. She turned to housekeeping to make ends meet, and with a tenacious grip on her dream to provide her daughter the very best life possible, Stephanie worked days and took classes online to earn a college degree, and began to write relentlessly. She wrote the true stories that weren't being told: the stories of overworked and underpaid Americans. Of living on food stamps and WIC (Women, Infants, and Children) coupons to eat. Of the government programs that provided her housing, but that doubled as halfway houses. The aloof government employees who called her lucky for receiving assistance while she didn't feel lucky at all. She wrote to remember the fight, to eventually cut through the deep-rooted stigmas of the working poor. Maid explores the underbelly of upper-middle class America and the reality of what it's like to be in service to them. "I'd become a nameless ghost," Stephanie writes about her relationship with her clients, many of whom do not know her from any other cleaner, but who she learns plenty about. As she begins to discover more about her clients' lives-their sadness and love, too-she begins to find hope in her own path. Her compassionate, unflinching writing as a journalist gives voice to the "servant" worker, and those pursuing the American Dream from below the poverty line. Maid is Stephanie's story, but it's not her alone. It is an inspiring testament to the strength, determination, and ultimate triumph of the human spirit.… (mais)
  1. 00
    On The Come Up de Angie Thomas (kristenl)
    kristenl: Coincidentally I was listening to this at the same time that I read Maid. Although it is a fictionalized young adult novel about a Black girl, the descriptions of poverty felt very similar.
  2. 00
    Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America de Barbara Ehrenreich (LovingLit)
  3. 00
    Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City de Matthew Desmond (Micheller7)
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Mostrando 1-5 de 38 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
I have to disagree with the multiple bad reviews of this book. I thought it was well written, an engaging topic, and very informative. Were there some bad choices made by the author that she narrates? Yes. But to decry this book as a long pity party misses the point. This is a brutally honest behind-the-scenes look at what multi-generational poverty looks like, and how the current system makes it very difficult to break that cycle. I also think it's an inspiring tale of how one woman managed to overcome the events and circumstances of her life to get to the point where she could write this book about painful circumstances. If you are looking for a tabloid look at the secrets maids uncover while they are cleaning middle-class homes, you will be disappointed. If you want lots of details about different government aid programs, and how the majority of people using those programs are cheats and frauds, then you will be disappointed. Accept this book for what it is and you will enjoy it. ( )
  Jeff.Rosendahl | Sep 21, 2021 |
The memoirs of a young woman who struggles to bring up her daughter in the United States, as a single mother, working as a cleaner.

While the writing is clear, much of the account is (in my view) rather dull, as she describes house after house. I felt a bit sorry for the author, but there was very little human interest in the book and it was difficult to relate to her.

Still, if it helps to highlight the difficulties inherent in being a single mother without a supportive family, it's probably worth reading.

Full review here: https://suesbookreviews.blogspot.com/2021/04/maid-by-stephanie-land.html ( )
  SueinCyprus | Apr 6, 2021 |
An interesting if uneven memoir about a single mother living in the northwestern U.S. From a dysfunctional family which hovers on the lower fringes of the middle class, Stephanie Land finds that an unplanned pregnancy with an abusive partner during the last recession leaves her struggling to make ends meet. Land is at once very upfront about some things (I think if I had snooped through the cremated remains of a client's family member, I wouldn't want to admit that publicly) and closemouthed about others (what exactly had happened in her early-to-mid twenties to derail her from a path she says she had long wanted to pursue? We never find out), and I think it's difficult to come away from this book without some sense of just how fundamentally flawed the American social welfare system is.

(Difficult, but not impossible—you could probably write a paper, if not a whole Master's thesis, about contemporary American attitudes towards poverty, working-class people, and making choices within a system that only gives you bad choices based just on the GoodReads comments on this book. I'm not saying Ireland doesn't have its problems, but oof.) ( )
  siriaeve | Mar 1, 2021 |
Maid by Stephanie Land opened my eyes to the levels of poverty in America. Many of the aspects of the story amazed me. But other revelations repulsed me such as the tattoos when money is so dear and the insistence of organic milk that is so much more expensive. Yes, Miss Land was trying to give her daughter the most nutritious meal, but sometimes that is too difficult. The dirtiness of the houses that she cleaned leaves wonderment that each week the same problems of cleaning exist. Yes, in America, there is still many opportunities to leave the gutter and find a better way of life. The levels of homelessness disturb me with the many regulations. And are we just creating a greater problem with all the federal and state agencies to aid people? What is the solution? ( )
  delphimo | Dec 20, 2020 |
Memoirs are one of my favorite kind of non-fiction books to read. I learn so much from reading about other people's perspectives and I love being able to have a glimpse into a world that I might previously have not known much about. I was very interested in reading Stephanie's Land book Maid and was excited when I found it on the "new releases" table at the library the other week.

Memoirs are also a very hard thing to review because they are someone's personal story. I would like to say that while this book didn't entirely work for me, I appreciate Land sharing her story and there were very powerful parts of it.

First, I think it can be deceiving when a book is compared to another book as powerful as Evicted and could potentially set your expectations unrealistically high. Evicted is touted as one of the most powerful non-fiction books on poverty in America and Maid is really a story of one person's experience in this situation. I think they are both important but it might be good to differentiate between those when starting this one.

Stephanie Land did not have an easy start in life and I think it is important to recognize the privileges that we are given (or not), just by the families and environments we are raised in. Many of the choices I was able to make in life were directly correlated to being born into a certain situation which really was just the luck of the draw.

As a child I was given the "gift" of education, I had people who supported and believed in me and I grew up in a home where my basic needs like having safe housing, healthy food and proper clothing were not something I ever needed to worry about. I do not think that means that someone cannot succeed without that, or that life will be a smooth ride if you have those things, but I do believe it is something that has to be part of the equation when talking about these topics.

There is a cycle of poverty that is very hard to get out of, and I appreciated that Land took on this issue in her writing. I think that there is a huge misunderstanding of things like subsidized housing and childcare, food stamps, and free healthcare and I appreciate that her story shares a perspective about these things that many may not have encountered before. I would have loved to hear more about these things and less about the details of the lives and homes of the people she cleaned for but really did not know at all.

I try very hard to not pass judgments on situations that I have not been in myself and unfortunately this is where this book really did not work for me. I have not been a single parent so I can only imagine many of the challenges that single working parents face. Land's story was powerful enough without passing judgments on the people she cleaned for or came across in the grocery store.

"Living with illness or pain was part of my daily life. But why did my clients have these problems? It seemed like access to healthy foods, gym memberships, doctors and all of that would keep a person fit and well. Maybe the stress of keeping up a two-story house, a bad marriage, and maintaining the illusion of grandeur overwhelmed their systems in similar ways to how poverty did mine."

This kind of thing really turned me off and I struggled with this part of her writing. There are so so many challenges that people face, no matter their socioeconomic level, and this just felt like a total disconnect for me...I always think it is okay to vent and share the challenges that you face, but I struggle with a lack of empathy or ability to have perspective on how choices also play some part on the path of our lives.

Because there really was a lack of reflection and discussion this book felt very whiny to me. I don't want to belittle someone's significant challenges without having walked in their shoes but there was just too much emphasis on why other people's lives were better without the addition of some introspection from Land herself. I also often wished for more background information which I think would have made this writing so much stronger. I applaud Land for putting herself out there and I am so happy to hear of all she has done to better the lives of herself and her children. ( )
  genthebookworm | Dec 19, 2020 |
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Stephanie Landautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Ehrenreich, BarbaraPrefácioautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER Evicted meets Nickel and Dimed in Stephanie Land's memoir about working as a maid, a beautiful and gritty exploration of poverty in America. Includes a foreword by Barbara Ehrenreich. At 28, Stephanie Land's plans of breaking free from the roots of her hometown in the Pacific Northwest to chase her dreams of attending a university and becoming a writer, were cut short when a summer fling turned into an unexpected pregnancy. She turned to housekeeping to make ends meet, and with a tenacious grip on her dream to provide her daughter the very best life possible, Stephanie worked days and took classes online to earn a college degree, and began to write relentlessly. She wrote the true stories that weren't being told: the stories of overworked and underpaid Americans. Of living on food stamps and WIC (Women, Infants, and Children) coupons to eat. Of the government programs that provided her housing, but that doubled as halfway houses. The aloof government employees who called her lucky for receiving assistance while she didn't feel lucky at all. She wrote to remember the fight, to eventually cut through the deep-rooted stigmas of the working poor. Maid explores the underbelly of upper-middle class America and the reality of what it's like to be in service to them. "I'd become a nameless ghost," Stephanie writes about her relationship with her clients, many of whom do not know her from any other cleaner, but who she learns plenty about. As she begins to discover more about her clients' lives-their sadness and love, too-she begins to find hope in her own path. Her compassionate, unflinching writing as a journalist gives voice to the "servant" worker, and those pursuing the American Dream from below the poverty line. Maid is Stephanie's story, but it's not her alone. It is an inspiring testament to the strength, determination, and ultimate triumph of the human spirit.

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