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The Catalogue of Shipwrecked Books:…
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The Catalogue of Shipwrecked Books: Christopher Columbus, His Son, and the… (edição: 2020)

de Edward Wilson-Lee (Autor)

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3051064,137 (4.1)22
"In this innovative work of history, Edward Wilson-Lee tells the extraordinary story of Hernando Colón, a singular visionary of the printing press-age who also happened to be Christopher Columbus's illegitimate son. At the peak of the Age of Exploration, Hernando traveled with Columbus on his final voyage to the New World, a journey that ended in disaster, bloody mutiny, and shipwreck. After Columbus's death in 1506, the eighteen-year-old Hernando sought to continue--and surpass--his father's campaign to explore the boundaries of the known world by building a library that would collect everything ever printed: a vast holding organized by summaries and catalogues, the first ever search engine for the exploding diversity of written matter as the printing press proliferated across Europe. Hernando restlessly and obsessively amassed his collection based on the groundbreaking conviction that a library of universal knowledge should include 'all books, in all languages and on all subjects,' even material often dismissed as ephemeral trash: ballads, erotica, newsletters, popular images, romances, fables. The loss of part of his collection to another maritime disaster in 1522--documented in his poignant Catalogue of Shipwrecked Books--set off the final scramble to complete this sublime project, a race against time to realize a vision of near-impossible perfection. Edward Wilson-Lee's account of Hernando's life is a testimony to the beautiful madness of book lovers, a plunge into sixteenth-century Europe's information revolution, and a reflection of the passion and intrigues that lie beneath our own attempts to bring order to the world today"--"The Catalogue of Shipwrecked Books tells the story of the first and greatest visionary of the print age, a man who saw how the explosive expansion of knowledge and information generated by the advent of the printing press would entirely change the landscape of thought and society. He also happened to be Christopher Columbus's illegitimate son. At the peak of the Age of Exploration, while his father sailed across the ocean to explore the boundaries of the known world, Hernando Colón sought to surpass Columbus's achievements by building a library that would encompass the world and include "all books, in all languages and on all subjects." In service of this vision, he spent his life travelling--first to the New World with his father in 1502, surviving through shipwreck and a bloody mutiny off the coast of Jamaica, and later, throughout Europe, scouring the bookstores of the day at the epicenter of printing. The very model of a Renaissance man, Hernando restlessly and obsessively bought thousands and thousands of books, amassing a collection based on the modern conviction that a truly great library should include the kind of material dismissed as ephemeral trash: ballads, pornography, newsletters, popular images, romances, fables. Using an invented system of hieroglyphs, he meticulously catalogued every item in his library, devising the first ever search engine for his rich profusion of books and images and music. A major setback in 1522 gave way to the creation of Hernando's Catalogue of Shipwrecked Books and inspired further refinements to his library, including a design for the first modern bookshelves. In this illuminating and brilliantly researched biography, Edward Wilson-Lee tells an enthralling story of the life and times of the first genius of the print age, a tale with striking lessons for our own modern experiences of information revolution and globalization."-- Amazon.com.While his father sailed across the ocean to explore the boundaries of the known world, Hernando Colón sought to surpass Columbus's achievements by building a library that would include "all books, in all languages and on all subjects." He spent his life travelling-- first to the New World with his father in 1502, surviving through shipwreck and a bloody mutiny off the coast of Jamaica, and later, throughout Europe, amassing a collection based on the modern conviction that a truly great library should include the kind of material dismissed as ephemeral trash: ballads, pornography, newsletters, popular images, romances, fables. Using an invented system of hieroglyphs he meticulously catalogued every item in his library, devising the first ever search engine for his rich profusion of books and images and music. Wilson-Lee tells of the life and times of this first genius of the print age. -- adapted from Amazon.com info… (mais)
Membro:Waltersgn
Título:The Catalogue of Shipwrecked Books: Christopher Columbus, His Son, and the Quest to Build the World's Greatest Library
Autores:Edward Wilson-Lee (Autor)
Informação:Scribner (2020), Edition: Reprint, 416 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Biography - Columbus, Archivists, Libraries

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The Catalogue of Shipwrecked Books: Christopher Columbus, His Son, and the Quest to Build the World's Greatest Library de Edward Wilson-Lee

Adicionado recentemente porluciadibarba, biblioteca privada, kLeeD, kmcmahon, Lugalbanda, fdhondt, tyburntree, BatSands
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As a professional archivist I found this to be a very cool work, considering that Hernando Colon (the illegitimate son of Christopher Columbus) seems to be a man after my own heart, with his obsessions regarding books and information and how to organize the positive onslaught of stuff that was already pouring forth from the printing presses of Europe in the early to mid 1500s. Though with a little more luck Colon might have been remembered as the father of library science, his real impact was to create the Christopher Columbus of popular myth; this spinning of the image of the great man being necessary to maintain the Colon family's fortunes as courtiers of the royal House of Spain. While I found this to be a lively story, the reality is that Wilson-Lee assumes that you have some background in the period, and will otherwise, dare I say it, be somewhat left out to sea. ( )
  Shrike58 | Oct 14, 2020 |
Hernando Colón y la búsqueda de una biblioteca universal
  Chule | Mar 29, 2020 |
Christopher Columbus's son Hernando, while unknown to most of us, was a man ahead of his time. Possessed of an inquiring intellect, he endeavored to accrue what at the time was the largest personal library in Europe, with 15,000 volumes. More importantly, he recognized that this much information would be useless unless the contents could be accessed, so he also developed a variety of indices, including a forerunner of the card catalog. His vision was nothing less than "an extraordinary premonition of the world of the internet, the World Wide Web."

His intent was not simply to amass a dusty collection of materials (he focused primarily on the printed book, but also favored what librarians call ephermera--pamphlets, posters, etc., as well as sheet music, all materials ignored by libraries of his day), but to make it a working library. This effort was primarily in defense of his father's legacy, and much of the book is spent recounting Columbus's legal challenges, which Hernando spent decades in the court of Spain's Charles I working to resolve. That Columbus has the reputation he does today is due largely to the success of those efforts, made possible by the library containing all the works necessary to rebut and correct those seeking to diminish Columbus. I, for one, did not know the fuller details of that history, and found the account a genuine gap-filler.

Hernando died fairly young, and despite leaving clear and innovative instructions for the growth of his library, his nephew let it fall to ruin. Only about 4,000 of the volumes are today preserved.

I'd be surprised if most readers did not enjoy the story, and find the historical background truly enlightening. ( )
  dono421846 | Mar 21, 2020 |
Edward Wilson-Lee has written a book that raises some very interesting questions, and is a real attempt to investigate the workings of a mind formed by mostly medieval concepts. It is a biography of Christopher Columbus' illegitimate son, Hernando Colon. i use as Wilson-L:ee does the Spanish form of his name, because it reveals a facet of the mental framework of the man's life. it seems Hernando spent a very great part of his life pursuing the polishing of his father's image, and the financial rewards resulting from the discovery of America. The book also visits the questions dealt with in the creation of one of the great libraries of the sixteenth century, and one of the first general purpose, and mixed media collections in the world. We visit, as well as the Caribbean, the central questions of librarianism....what will one include in one's collections, and how will one order and access the material? The book is well written, with occasional strokes of wit and adequate mapping of a largely peripatetic life, but a life with a purpose that led the man into some rather odd byways. It expands the mind of the reader by raising an image of the real changes between 1500 and now, in the mental life of people in general. ( )
  DinadansFriend | Jan 27, 2020 |
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"In this innovative work of history, Edward Wilson-Lee tells the extraordinary story of Hernando Colón, a singular visionary of the printing press-age who also happened to be Christopher Columbus's illegitimate son. At the peak of the Age of Exploration, Hernando traveled with Columbus on his final voyage to the New World, a journey that ended in disaster, bloody mutiny, and shipwreck. After Columbus's death in 1506, the eighteen-year-old Hernando sought to continue--and surpass--his father's campaign to explore the boundaries of the known world by building a library that would collect everything ever printed: a vast holding organized by summaries and catalogues, the first ever search engine for the exploding diversity of written matter as the printing press proliferated across Europe. Hernando restlessly and obsessively amassed his collection based on the groundbreaking conviction that a library of universal knowledge should include 'all books, in all languages and on all subjects,' even material often dismissed as ephemeral trash: ballads, erotica, newsletters, popular images, romances, fables. The loss of part of his collection to another maritime disaster in 1522--documented in his poignant Catalogue of Shipwrecked Books--set off the final scramble to complete this sublime project, a race against time to realize a vision of near-impossible perfection. Edward Wilson-Lee's account of Hernando's life is a testimony to the beautiful madness of book lovers, a plunge into sixteenth-century Europe's information revolution, and a reflection of the passion and intrigues that lie beneath our own attempts to bring order to the world today"--"The Catalogue of Shipwrecked Books tells the story of the first and greatest visionary of the print age, a man who saw how the explosive expansion of knowledge and information generated by the advent of the printing press would entirely change the landscape of thought and society. He also happened to be Christopher Columbus's illegitimate son. At the peak of the Age of Exploration, while his father sailed across the ocean to explore the boundaries of the known world, Hernando Colón sought to surpass Columbus's achievements by building a library that would encompass the world and include "all books, in all languages and on all subjects." In service of this vision, he spent his life travelling--first to the New World with his father in 1502, surviving through shipwreck and a bloody mutiny off the coast of Jamaica, and later, throughout Europe, scouring the bookstores of the day at the epicenter of printing. The very model of a Renaissance man, Hernando restlessly and obsessively bought thousands and thousands of books, amassing a collection based on the modern conviction that a truly great library should include the kind of material dismissed as ephemeral trash: ballads, pornography, newsletters, popular images, romances, fables. Using an invented system of hieroglyphs, he meticulously catalogued every item in his library, devising the first ever search engine for his rich profusion of books and images and music. A major setback in 1522 gave way to the creation of Hernando's Catalogue of Shipwrecked Books and inspired further refinements to his library, including a design for the first modern bookshelves. In this illuminating and brilliantly researched biography, Edward Wilson-Lee tells an enthralling story of the life and times of the first genius of the print age, a tale with striking lessons for our own modern experiences of information revolution and globalization."-- Amazon.com.While his father sailed across the ocean to explore the boundaries of the known world, Hernando Colón sought to surpass Columbus's achievements by building a library that would include "all books, in all languages and on all subjects." He spent his life travelling-- first to the New World with his father in 1502, surviving through shipwreck and a bloody mutiny off the coast of Jamaica, and later, throughout Europe, amassing a collection based on the modern conviction that a truly great library should include the kind of material dismissed as ephemeral trash: ballads, pornography, newsletters, popular images, romances, fables. Using an invented system of hieroglyphs he meticulously catalogued every item in his library, devising the first ever search engine for his rich profusion of books and images and music. Wilson-Lee tells of the life and times of this first genius of the print age. -- adapted from Amazon.com info

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