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Monument: Poems New and Selected de Natasha…
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Monument: Poems New and Selected (original: 2018; edição: 2018)

de Natasha Trethewey (Autor)

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784276,140 (4.13)44
Longlisted for the 2018 National Book Award for Poetry "[Trethewey's poems] dig beneath the surface of history--personal or communal, from childhood or from a century ago--to explore the human struggles that we all face."--James H. Billington, 13th Librarian of Congress   Layering joy and urgent defiance--against physical and cultural erasure, against white supremacy whether intangible or graven in stone--Trethewey's work gives pedestal and witness to unsung icons.Monument, Trethewey's first retrospective, draws together verse that delineates the stories of working class African American women, a mixed-race prostitute, one of the first black Civil War regiments, mestizo and mulatto figures in Casta paintings, Gulf coast victims of Katrina. Through the collection, inlaid and inextricable, winds the poet's own family history of trauma and loss, resilience and love.   In this setting, each section, each poem drawn from an "opus of classics both elegant and necessary,"* weaves and interlocks with those that come before and those that follow. As a whole,Monument casts new light on the trauma of our national wounds, our shared history. This is a poet's remarkable labor to source evidence, persistence, and strength from the past in order to change the very foundation of the vocabulary we use to speak about race, gender, and our collective future.   *Academy of American Poets' chancellor Marilyn Nelson… (mais)
Membro:eloeffelman
Título:Monument: Poems New and Selected
Autores:Natasha Trethewey (Autor)
Informação:Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (2018), 208 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
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Monument: Poems New and Selected de Natasha Trethewey (2018)

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Exibindo 4 de 4
Monument: Poems New and Selected -Natasha Trethewey
5 stars

Natasha Trethewey has a memoir that will be released at the end of this month. That book’s description caught my attention on several recent lists of books by black authors. I knew her name. How did I know her name? She is a poet. I read a lot of poetry, but I couldn’t quite place her in my memory. I looked for her work at Poetry Foundation (poetryfoundation.org/poets/natasha-tretheway). After reading a few poems from the website, I was hooked.

Trethewey is a former US poet laureate. She won a Pulitzer prize in 2007 for her third book of poems, Native Guard. Like Trevor Noah, she was also ‘born a crime’ in 1966 a year before the ruling in Loving v. Virginia.

As the title indicates, Monument: Poems New and Selected is a collection. They are meditations, examinations of race, both personally and historically. They are autobiographical; grief stricken examinations of her mother’s murder by an abusive stepfather, personal explorations of a mixed race childhood. Trethewey is an accomplished poet, but I didn’t read these poems thinking about how well she handled line and meter, image and paradox. The content of these poems is accessible. They are worthy of rereading and further thought, but they also have an immediate impact.

I look forward to reading Memorial Drive: A Daughter’s Memoir when it is published a week from now. I’ve also ordered copies of Bellocq’s Ophelia and Native Guard because neither of those books, by this award winning poet, are available from either of the public library systems that I can access. ( )
  msjudy | Jul 19, 2020 |
Monument by Natasha Trethewey: a poetry collection consisting of serious stories of a mixed-race prostitute, historical struggles of people of colour, about hurricane Katrina, the poet's own family stories of loss. Still, the writing doesn't pull me in as a reader, there's not a lot of emotion here. It doesn't seem like a purposefully lack of emotion either, and it got better towards the end. She describes scenes, but doesn't add much to most of them, the way I see it. 2/5 stars. ( )
  aquapages | Jul 8, 2020 |
I am getting a head start on reading for National Poetry Month with this retrospective volume of Natasha Trethewey's poetry. She is one of my favorite poets, and I don't say that lightly, because I find most poetry makes the simple hard to understand merely by being in verse. Trethewey's poetry is not at all like that. Whether she's reflecting on history as in "Native Guard," delving into her personal history as in "Early Evening, Frankfort, Kentucky" or delving into artwork in one of her ekphrastic poems, she has a way of choosing just the right word of phrase to say precisely what she means in a way the reader understands, and occasionally taking one's breath away. Though I've read three of her collections so only some of the poems were truly new to me, they were nonetheless fresh and I occasionally had to reread a couple of times to just to let it fully sink in. A phenomenal collection I highly recommend to anyone. ( )
2 vote bell7 | Mar 26, 2020 |
I’m new to poet-laureate Natasha Trethewey’s work and was captured from the moment of the first poem in this omnibus. These are vignette-ish narratives, with close-in perspectives of people of color, past and recent -- their traumas and histories and grief and resilience -- including Trethewey herself, particularly as regards her white father and her mother’s death at the hands of an ex-husband.

My typical practice with collections of short works is to note in the table of contents the entries that especially resonate. I managed to do so with that first poem ... and then was repeatedly surprised to find I’d become so immersed in a series of poems that I’d forgotten to pause and note them.

(Review based on an advance reading copy provided by the publisher.) ( )
  DetailMuse | Jan 30, 2019 |
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Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Natasha Tretheweyautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Robinson, Mark R.Designer da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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Premiações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Where no monuments exist to heroes but in the common words and deeds...
—from "The Great City," Walt Whitman
Memory is a cemetery
I've visited once or twice, white
ubiquitous and the set-aside

Everywhere under foot...

—Charles Wright
What is love?
One name for it is knowledge.

—Robert Penn Warren

After such knowledge, what forgiveness?
—T.S. Eliot
Often I am permitted to return to a meadow
as if it were a given property of the mind...

—Robert Duncan
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
For my parents—
Gwen and Rick
and
for Brett
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Imperatives for Carrying On
in the Aftermath

Do not hang your head or clench your fists
when even your friend, after hearing the story,
says, My mother would never put up with that.
Citações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Cleanliness is next to godliness...

Windows and doors flung wide,
curtains two-stepping
forward and backward, neck bones
bumping in the pot, a choir
of clothes clapping on the line

Nearer my God to Thee...

She beats time on the rugs,
blows dust from the broom
like dandelion spores, each one
a wish for something better.

–excerpt from Domestic Work, 1937
Gesture of a Woman in Process

FROM A PHOTOGRAPH BY
CLIFTON JOHNSON, 1902


In the foreground, two women,
their squinting faces
creased into texture—

a deep relief—the lines
like palms of hands
I could read if I could touch.

Around them, their dailiness:
clotheslines sagged with linens,
a patch of greens and yams,

buckets of peas for shelling.
One woman pauses for the picture.
The other won't be still.

Even now, her hands circling,
the white blur of her apron
still in motion.
Yes: I was born a slave, at harvest time,
in the Parish of Ascension; I've reached
thirty-three with history of one younger
inscribed upon my back. I now use ink
to keep record, a closed book, not the lure
of memory—flawed, changeful—that dulls the lash
for the master, sharpens it for the slave.

—excerpt from Native Guard (November 1862)
Native Guard

December 1862

For the slave, having a master sharpens
the bend into work, the way the sergeant
moves us now to perfect battalion drill,
dress parade. Still, we're called supply units—
not infantry—and so we dig trenches,
haul burdens for the army no less heavy
than before. I heard the colonel call it
nigger work. Half rations make our work
familiar still. We take those things we need
from the Confederates' abandoned homes:
salt, sugar, even this journal, near full
with someone else's words, overlapped now,
crosshatched beneath mine. On every page,
his story intersecting with my own.
7. Benediction

I thought that when I saw my brother
walking through the gates of the prison,
he would look like a man entering

his life. And he did. He carried
a small bag, holding it away from his body
as if he would not touch it, or

that it weighed almost nothing.
The clothes he wore seemed to belong
to someone else, like hand-me-downs

given a child who will one day
grow into them. Behind him, at the fence,
the inmates were waving, someone saying

All right now. And then
my brother was walking toward us,
a few awkward steps, at first, until

he got it—how to hold up the too-big pants
with one hand, and in the other
carry everything else he had.
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Longlisted for the 2018 National Book Award for Poetry "[Trethewey's poems] dig beneath the surface of history--personal or communal, from childhood or from a century ago--to explore the human struggles that we all face."--James H. Billington, 13th Librarian of Congress   Layering joy and urgent defiance--against physical and cultural erasure, against white supremacy whether intangible or graven in stone--Trethewey's work gives pedestal and witness to unsung icons.Monument, Trethewey's first retrospective, draws together verse that delineates the stories of working class African American women, a mixed-race prostitute, one of the first black Civil War regiments, mestizo and mulatto figures in Casta paintings, Gulf coast victims of Katrina. Through the collection, inlaid and inextricable, winds the poet's own family history of trauma and loss, resilience and love.   In this setting, each section, each poem drawn from an "opus of classics both elegant and necessary,"* weaves and interlocks with those that come before and those that follow. As a whole,Monument casts new light on the trauma of our national wounds, our shared history. This is a poet's remarkable labor to source evidence, persistence, and strength from the past in order to change the very foundation of the vocabulary we use to speak about race, gender, and our collective future.   *Academy of American Poets' chancellor Marilyn Nelson

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