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Normal People: One million copies sold de…
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Normal People: One million copies sold (edição: 2019)

de Sally Rooney (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
3,5811972,726 (3.75)149
The feverishly anticipated second novel from the young author of 2017's most acclaimed debut Conversations with Friends. Connell and Marianne grow up in the same small town in rural Ireland. The similarities end there; they are from very different worlds. When they both earn places at Trinity College in Dublin, a connection that has grown between them lasts long into the following years. This is an exquisite love story about how a person can change another person's life - a simple yet profound realisation that unfolds beautifully over the course of the novel. It tells us how difficult it is to talk about how we feel and it tells us - blazingly - about cycles of domination, legitimacy and privilege. Alternating menace with overwhelming tenderness, Sally Rooney's second novel breathes fiction with new life --… (mais)
Membro:SGLongstaff
Título:Normal People: One million copies sold
Autores:Sally Rooney (Autor)
Informação:Faber & Faber (2019), Edition: Main, 288 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Work Information

Normal People de Sally Rooney

  1. 50
    One Day de David Nicholls (BookshelfMonstrosity)
    BookshelfMonstrosity: Normal People is more explicit than One Day, but both of these character-driven novels follow a couple who can't resist each other and come together only to separate over and over again.
  2. 30
    Trust Exercise de Susan Choi (BookshelfMonstrosity)
    BookshelfMonstrosity: Though Trust Exercise employs an unconventional storyline that unfolds with stylistically complex flair, and Normal People is more straightforward, both novels play with power dynamics within relationships and explore the limitations of communication.… (mais)
  3. 10
    Conversations with Friends de Sally Rooney (hazzabamboo)
    hazzabamboo: Her second, and even better - they cover quite similar ground
  4. 00
    In Paris With You de Clementine Beauvais (SandSing7)
    SandSing7: The characters and their relationship are eerily similar, the writing is lovely and poetic (even though Paris is written in verse), and it's super weird that even the endings are exactly the same.
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» Veja também 149 menções

Inglês (183)  Catalão (4)  Holandês (3)  Espanhol (2)  Alemão (1)  Francês (1)  Sueco (1)  Todos os idiomas (195)
Mostrando 1-5 de 195 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Well, this definitely drew me into their story. I would have changed the ending a bit, but overall I quite liked it. ( )
  JorgeousJotts | Dec 3, 2021 |
Well written but tedious and uninteresting, despite the serious topics of abuse, trauma, alienation, depression. I wonder what the Booker Prize people were thinking. ( )
  Bruyere_C | Dec 2, 2021 |
Review for "Normal People" by Sally Rooney (⭐⭐⭐🌠): I've been putting off this review for a few days now, but I feel like it's time to just be honest with myself. I'm glad I read this book and I can see why other readers have taken such an interest in this story. The writing style is completely unique and Rooney was able to keep my interest for the entire book because I just had to see what was going to be the fate of the two main characters. It was a book you really had to pay attention to, but you're glad you did. I will admit I wasn't completely in love with this book for personal reasons. It reminded me of some rough relationships I've been through and I simply was not in the mood to relive them. Otherwise, I can understand the appeal of this book. I recommend this book, but be aware that like most relationships, it's not always rainbows and butterflies. ( )
  kathrynwithak7 | Nov 24, 2021 |
The Impossibility of Complete Knowledge

In Sally Rooney’s Normal People, Marianne and Connell are friends, lovers, friends, lovers, the pair in a relationship fueled by things that pull them together and push them apart, the main one of which seems to be the impossibility of completely knowing another person.

Often, you hear friends of ideal couples say that they are so much alike they complete each other’s sentences. However, anyone ever in a relationship, including marriage, knows a partner can be maddeningly incommunicative, or communicate in a manner that misleads, or simply keeps things to themselves for any number of reasons, as, on this last point, does Marianne about her abusive home life for fear Connell will think her not a normal person.

It’s this quality, that people’s histories, emotions, proclivities, self-image and -awareness, likes and dislikes when in a relationship overlap in each other’s perception in a way that resembles a Venn Diagram—it’s this impossibility of complete knowledge of another person that some readers will find most intriguing in Rooney’s novel.

And then there are Rooney’s stellar qualities as a prose writer. In Normal People, she employs simple declarative sentences that convey much nuance about the couple’s erratic relationship, as well as their relationships with other people and lovers. She’s often wry in ways that make you wish she would write dialogue for your life. As an example, later in the novel, when Connell is in a relationship with Helen, who happens to be what most would consider a shining example of normal, she asks what he makes of her old long-term boyfriend:

I don’t know, said Connell. He seems kind of uncool, doesn’t he?
She thought that was hilarious. They were lying in bed, Connell had his arm around her.
Is that your type, you like uncool guys? he said.
You tell me.
Why, am I uncool?
I think so, she said. I mean that in a nice way. I don’t like cool people.
He sat up slightly to look down at her.
Am I really? he said. I’m not offended but honestly, I thought I was kind of cool.
You’re such a culchie [hick], though.
Am I? In what way am I?
You have the thickest Sligo accent, she said.
I do not. I can’t believe that. No one’s ever said that to me before. Do I really?
She was still laughing. He stroked his hand over her belly, grinning to himself because he was making her laugh.
I can hardly understand you half the time, she said. Thankfully you’re the strong and silent type.
He had to laugh then too. Helen, that is brutal, he said.
She tucked a hand behind her head. Do you honestly think you’re cool? she said.
Well, not anymore.


She has a real eye for how people move and act in conversation, how they touch their hair, worry a beer bottle, hold a cup, things most of us don’t pay much attention to but which can tell little tales of how we feel at the moment. And while many writers have trouble with sex, she writes comfortably and confidently about it, even when it becomes sadomasochistic. (Not to reveal too much here, but Marianne, owning to her history, derives satisfaction from submissiveness, both physical and psychological.)

Above all, though, what makes Normal People so rewarding, what has critics praising it, is how it tracks a relationship over several years in a way that really does speak truth to how people relate to reach other, and how they can’t always communicate completely. ( )
  write-review | Nov 4, 2021 |
The Impossibility of Complete Knowledge

In Sally Rooney’s Normal People, Marianne and Connell are friends, lovers, friends, lovers, the pair in a relationship fueled by things that pull them together and push them apart, the main one of which seems to be the impossibility of completely knowing another person.

Often, you hear friends of ideal couples say that they are so much alike they complete each other’s sentences. However, anyone ever in a relationship, including marriage, knows a partner can be maddeningly incommunicative, or communicate in a manner that misleads, or simply keeps things to themselves for any number of reasons, as, on this last point, does Marianne about her abusive home life for fear Connell will think her not a normal person.

It’s this quality, that people’s histories, emotions, proclivities, self-image and -awareness, likes and dislikes when in a relationship overlap in each other’s perception in a way that resembles a Venn Diagram—it’s this impossibility of complete knowledge of another person that some readers will find most intriguing in Rooney’s novel.

And then there are Rooney’s stellar qualities as a prose writer. In Normal People, she employs simple declarative sentences that convey much nuance about the couple’s erratic relationship, as well as their relationships with other people and lovers. She’s often wry in ways that make you wish she would write dialogue for your life. As an example, later in the novel, when Connell is in a relationship with Helen, who happens to be what most would consider a shining example of normal, she asks what he makes of her old long-term boyfriend:

I don’t know, said Connell. He seems kind of uncool, doesn’t he?
She thought that was hilarious. They were lying in bed, Connell had his arm around her.
Is that your type, you like uncool guys? he said.
You tell me.
Why, am I uncool?
I think so, she said. I mean that in a nice way. I don’t like cool people.
He sat up slightly to look down at her.
Am I really? he said. I’m not offended but honestly, I thought I was kind of cool.
You’re such a culchie [hick], though.
Am I? In what way am I?
You have the thickest Sligo accent, she said.
I do not. I can’t believe that. No one’s ever said that to me before. Do I really?
She was still laughing. He stroked his hand over her belly, grinning to himself because he was making her laugh.
I can hardly understand you half the time, she said. Thankfully you’re the strong and silent type.
He had to laugh then too. Helen, that is brutal, he said.
She tucked a hand behind her head. Do you honestly think you’re cool? she said.
Well, not anymore.


She has a real eye for how people move and act in conversation, how they touch their hair, worry a beer bottle, hold a cup, things most of us don’t pay much attention to but which can tell little tales of how we feel at the moment. And while many writers have trouble with sex, she writes comfortably and confidently about it, even when it becomes sadomasochistic. (Not to reveal too much here, but Marianne, owning to her history, derives satisfaction from submissiveness, both physical and psychological.)

Above all, though, what makes Normal People so rewarding, what has critics praising it, is how it tracks a relationship over several years in a way that really does speak truth to how people relate to reach other, and how they can’t always communicate completely. ( )
  write-review | Nov 4, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 195 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
[T]he idealized reading experience Rooney casts for her young writer is a magnetic mingling of literary minds that sharpens an intelligence capable not merely of imagining others but of imagining how to be close to them, even how to live with the responsibility of their happiness and dreams.
adicionado por ScattershotSteph | editarThe Nation, Hannah Gold (Sep 17, 2019)
 
[U]pon critical reflection, the novel’s territory comes to seem like more fog than not. Which is to say: it’s a novel about university life, but without collegiate descriptions or interactions with professors or references to intellectual histories or texts; about growing up, but without any adults [. . .]; about Ireland, but without any sense of place, national history, or even physical description (if Joyce wrote Ulysses in order that Dublin might be reconstructed brick by brick, you’d be hard pressed to even break ground using Normal People); about Connell becoming a writer, but without any meaningful access to his interior development, or any sense conveyed of how his creative “passion” inflects his life; and, finally, about Marianne and Connell’s intertwined fate where we are only intermittently given access to sustained moments of intimacy.
 
Rooney's slivers of insight into how Marianne and Connell wrestle with their emotions and question their identity in the process made it one of the most realistic portrayals of young love I've read. Their relationship is rife with mistakes, misunderstandings, and missed chances that could be simplified if only they communicated and didn't subconsciously suppress their feelings, as millennials are wont to do.
 
Here, youth, love and cowardice are unavoidably intertwined, distilled into a novel that demands to be read compulsively, in one sitting.
 
[W]hile Rooney may write about apparent aimlessness and all the distractions of our age, her novels are laser-focused and word-perfect. They build power by a steady accretion of often simple declarative sentences that track minuscule shifts in feelings.
adicionado por ScattershotSteph | editarNPR Books, Heller McAlpin (Apr 16, 2019)
 

» Adicionar outros autores

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Rooney, Sallyautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Baardman, GerdaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Balmelli, MauriziaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Lindell, KlaraTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
McMahon, AoifeNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Pellisa, IngaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Riera, ErnestTraductorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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The feverishly anticipated second novel from the young author of 2017's most acclaimed debut Conversations with Friends. Connell and Marianne grow up in the same small town in rural Ireland. The similarities end there; they are from very different worlds. When they both earn places at Trinity College in Dublin, a connection that has grown between them lasts long into the following years. This is an exquisite love story about how a person can change another person's life - a simple yet profound realisation that unfolds beautifully over the course of the novel. It tells us how difficult it is to talk about how we feel and it tells us - blazingly - about cycles of domination, legitimacy and privilege. Alternating menace with overwhelming tenderness, Sally Rooney's second novel breathes fiction with new life --

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