Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

A Passage to India (The World's Best…
Carregando...

A Passage to India (The World's Best Reading) (original: 1924; edição: 1989)

de E. M. Forster (Autor), Christopher Magadini (Ilustrador), Scott Russell Sanders (Posfácio)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
12,583143507 (3.76)609
In this hard-hitting novel, first published in 1924, the murky personal relationship between an Englishwoman and an Indian doctor mirrors the troubled politics of colonialism. Adela Quested and her fellow British travelers, eager to experience the "real" India, develop a friendship with the urbane Dr. Aziz. While on a group outing, Adela and Dr. Aziz visit the Marabar caves together. As they emerge, Adela accuses the doctor of assaulting her. While Adela never actually claims she was raped, the decisions she makes ostracize her from both her countrymen and the natives, setting off a complex chain of events that forever changes the lives of all involved. This intense and moving story asks the listener serious questions about preconceptions regarding race, sex, religion, and truth. A political and philosophical masterpiece.… (mais)
Membro:milbourt
Título:A Passage to India (The World's Best Reading)
Autores:E. M. Forster (Autor)
Outros autores:Christopher Magadini (Ilustrador), Scott Russell Sanders (Posfácio)
Informação:Reader's Digest Association (1989), Edition: First Edition, 302 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Informações da Obra

A Passage to India de E. M. Forster (1924)

  1. 60
    The Raj Quartet, Volume 1: The Jewel in the Crown; The Day of the Scorpion de Paul Scott (FemmeNoiresque)
    FemmeNoiresque: Scott's The Raj Quartet, and particularly the relationship between Daphne Manners and Hari Kumar in the first novel, The Jewel In The Crown, is a revisioning of the charge of rape made by Adela Quested to Dr Aziz. Race, class and empire are explored in the aftermath of this event, in WWII India.… (mais)
  2. 50
    Where Angels Fear to Tread de E. M. Forster (li33ieg)
    li33ieg: Same author, different setting, same core themes
  3. 40
    Maurice de E. M. Forster (li33ieg)
    li33ieg: The man is brilliant! One should read all of his books!
  4. 40
    The Poisonwood Bible de Barbara Kingsolver (lucyknows)
    lucyknows: You could use the theme of colonialism to pair The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver with Passage to India by E. M. Forster.
  5. 31
    The Jewel in the Crown de Paul Scott (Cecrow)
    Cecrow: These two novels bear close relationship in setting and circumstance.
  6. 10
    Shantaram de Gregory David Roberts (Booksloth)
  7. 10
    Major Pettigrew's Last Stand de Helen Simonson (kiwiflowa)
  8. 00
    Hindoo Holiday: An Indian Journal de J. R. Ackerley (SomeGuyInVirginia)
  9. 00
    Slowly Down the Ganges de Eric Newby (John_Vaughan)
  10. 00
    Staying On de Paul Scott (KayCliff)
  11. 00
    The God of Small Things de Arundhati Roy (WildMaggie)
  12. 00
    Natural Opium: Some Travelers' Tales de Diane Johnson (Usuário anônimo)
  13. 34
    The Jewel in the Crown [1984 TV mini-series] de Christopher Morahan (li33ieg)
    li33ieg: Similar period and themes
  14. 01
    An Area of Darkness de V. S. Naipaul (zasmine)
    zasmine: Cross referenced by Naipaul in 'An area of Darkness'
1920s (3)
Asia (13)
AP Lit (32)
My TBR (15)
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 609 menções

Inglês (133)  Espanhol (4)  Francês (2)  Holandês (2)  Hebraico (1)  Italiano (1)  Todos os idiomas (143)
Mostrando 1-5 de 143 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
So, this white lady goes into a cave with this Indian guy and comes out accusing him of something that she's not sure really happened. And thusly we explore the crazy political and social dynamics between colony and colonizer. Many say this is Forster's best work, but I get so peeved at the white lady for not knowing what really happened in the cave that I have to take away stars. ( )
  LibrarianDest | Jan 3, 2024 |
Definitely a book written in a different era, an era where people read slowly and focussed on nuance. I understand why the other Forster book I read, A Room with a View, did not go well on audio. There are leaps between paragraphs that do not convey themselves well orally the way they can be detected visually on the page.
  LDVoorberg | Dec 24, 2023 |
Somehow I'd gotten the impression that A Passage to India was a departure from Forster's earlier novels. In subject matter, sure, but in all else this is a very Forsterian novel: sharply observed social commentary, lyrical prose, meditations on the human condition, and an almost mythic quality that is nevertheless grounded in the banal. Forster's novels are romantic, but they don't romanticize.

I'm glad I found myself reading this book in 2020. It's fundamentally a novel about nationalism, a topic I have formed Strong Opinions about. Actually maybe just one opinion, which Forster evidently shares. Please imagine, in place of this book, a tract titled "NATIONALISM" in 72-pt font, followed by one sentence: "FUCK THAT SHIT." (Forster phrases it more delicately.)

As a portrait of India and Indian people goes, I am not equipped to judge this novel. I think I can say it is a humane and openhearted effort. Certainly Forster's disdain for British culture does not lead him into the trap I expected, that of romanticizing the East. Instead, he attempts to be both empathetic and objective.

As far as objectivity goes, well. The text is littered with generalizations about Indians; some of these are the narrative's attempts at pointing out cultural differences, while others rise from the collective point-of-view of the colonizers. All that said, I expected this to be a novel written for the white gaze, and it's not quite that. Forster seems to be reaching toward an inclusive audience, whether or not he ever quite gets there.

I won't give away the plot, but I will say that this novel is set in British India at the turn of the 20th century and shows a British elite closing ranks in response to their tribal identity being threatened. The threat isn't some vast cultural divide between British and Indian people—the mutiny of 1857 is passing out of memory; the Indian elite is increasingly Westernized. To borrow an observation from Hannah Arendt, it's not necessarily difference that triggers xenophobia, but assimilation and the threat of social categories dissolving.

Meanwhile we have Dr. Aziz and his circle, acculturated Muslim Indians who are trying to invent a tribe of their own. Their definition of India keeps widening—Muslim identity becomes Indian pan-nationalism, which almost widens to human solidarity—but they, and we, can't quite reach across the gap.

And here's where this book gets really interesting, using the vocabulary of religion to imagine the (im)possibilities of a truly universal love. You could, in fact, write a very trite five-paragraph essay about how the second half of this book follows the structure of the Nativity story. I have no idea if Forster had this in mind; certainly he's not crass enough to explicitly compare the experiences Adele and Mrs. Morse have in the caves to an Annunciation. Nevertheless, this scene does take on a numinous quality. Encountering divinity is not a comfortable experience, threatening our belief that we are separate individuals in a structured universe. When the gods try to seize us, we flail.

This book won't enchant you with its memorable character studies or gripping plot, but something about the shape of Forster's novels is really compelling to me. I'm glad I read this one.
  raschneid | Dec 19, 2023 |
3.5/5 My feelings about this book were all over the place. Forster's writing is gorgeous as usual, but I had a difficult time caring about any of these characters, British or Indian. The motives behind the characters' actions were vague and noncommittal. The so-called exotic atmosphere was tainted--similar in a way to Joyce's “Araby“. I walked away unenlightened and depressed. ( )
  crabbyabbe | Oct 12, 2023 |
Profoundly dissatisfying, as it was intended. ( )
  emmby | Oct 4, 2023 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 143 (seguinte | mostrar todas)

» Adicionar outros autores (31 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Forster, E. M.autor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Adam, VikasNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Burra, PeterIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Campbell, AliArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Dastor, SamNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Davidson, FrederickNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Diaz, DavidArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Furbank, P. N.Introduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Magadini, ChristopherIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Mishra, PankajIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Motti, AdrianaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Nyman, VäinöTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Pigott-Smith, TimNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Sanders, Scott RussellPosfácioautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Simpson, WilliamArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Stallybrass, OliverEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Wilby, JamesNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

Está contido em

Tem a adaptação

Tem como guia de referência/texto acompanhante

Tem como estudo

Tem um comentário sobre o texto

Tem um guia de estudo para estudantes

Prêmios

Notable Lists

Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Lugares importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Eventos importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Filmes relacionados
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
To Syed Ross Masood and to the seventeen years of our friendship
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Except for the Marabar caves--and they are twenty miles off--the city of Chrandrapore presents nothing extraordinary.
The India described in A Passage to India no longer exists either politically or socially. (Prefatory Note)
Perhaps it is chance, more than any peculiar devotion, that determines a man in his choice of medium, when he finds himself possessed by an obscure impulse towards creation. (Introduction)
Citações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
"We must exclude someone from our gathering, or we shall be left with nothing."
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Clique para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
(Clique para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
(Clique para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
CDD/MDS canônico
LCC Canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês (1)

In this hard-hitting novel, first published in 1924, the murky personal relationship between an Englishwoman and an Indian doctor mirrors the troubled politics of colonialism. Adela Quested and her fellow British travelers, eager to experience the "real" India, develop a friendship with the urbane Dr. Aziz. While on a group outing, Adela and Dr. Aziz visit the Marabar caves together. As they emerge, Adela accuses the doctor of assaulting her. While Adela never actually claims she was raped, the decisions she makes ostracize her from both her countrymen and the natives, setting off a complex chain of events that forever changes the lives of all involved. This intense and moving story asks the listener serious questions about preconceptions regarding race, sex, religion, and truth. A political and philosophical masterpiece.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Current Discussions

Nenhum(a)

Capas populares

Links rápidos

Avaliação

Média: (3.76)
0.5 3
1 41
1.5 6
2 137
2.5 22
3 433
3.5 127
4 776
4.5 84
5 423

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 208,915,543 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível