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Weather (Vintage Contemporaries) de Jenny…
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Weather (Vintage Contemporaries) (edição: 2021)

de Jenny Offill (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
7856021,649 (3.69)65
"Lizzie Benson slid into her job as a librarian without a traditional degree. But this gives her a vantage point from which to practice her other calling: she is a fake shrink. For years, she has tended to her God-haunted mother and her recovering addict brother. They have both stabilized for the moment, but Lizzie has little chance to spend her new free time with husband and son before her old mentor, Sylvia Liller, makes a proposal. She's become famous for her prescient podcast, Hell and High Water, and wants to hire Lizzie to answer the mail she receives: from left-wingers worried about climate change and right wingers worried about the decline of western civilization. As Lizzie dives into this polarized world, she begins to wonder what it means to keep tending your own garden once you've seen the flames beyond its walls. When her brother becomes a father and Sylvia a recluse, Lizzie is forced to address the limits of her own experience--but still she tries to save everyone, using everything she's learned about empathy and despair, conscience and collusion, from her years of wandering the library stacks . . . And all the while the voices of the city keep floating in--funny, disturbing, and increasingly mad"--… (mais)
Membro:allyrod113
Título:Weather (Vintage Contemporaries)
Autores:Jenny Offill (Autor)
Informação:Vintage (2021), 224 pages
Coleções:Audible
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Detalhes da Obra

Weather de Jenny Offill

Adicionado recentemente porbiblioteca privada, BonnD, AKBouterse, VaniceD, kresshagen, veracruzlynn, ToriC90, Rowan_Neufeld
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Inglês (53)  Catalão (3)  Holandês (1)  Todos os idiomas (57)
Mostrando 1-5 de 57 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
I enjoyed this short book. Don't be turned off by the plot description...climate change, etc. It doesn't really go too deep into any kind of a plot or subject matter. The book is mostly comprised of random thoughts going through the narrator's mind and random snippets of her daily life. Here are a few snippets that I bookmarked:

I need to pack for this trip, but there's something buzzing around the room. I can't see it, but I can hear it hurling itself against the glass. A bee maybe, or a wasp. Over there, on the blinds, I think. I capture it with the aid of a cup and an index card.

Quiet in the cup. Hard to believe that isn't joy, the way it flies away when I fling it out the window.

This one made me laugh out loud:
Eli (her child) announces that he has decided to have two children; no, he corrects himself, one, because it is easier. We order grilled cheese sandwiches and eavesdrop on the people at the next table. "Is he your soul mate? the woman asks her friend.
"Hard to tell," she says.

Hard to tell!!!! lol

This one, too.

It is dusk when Henry and I leave the park. A car nearly runs us over. Now we're right next to her at the light. My brother goes up to the window. "Lady, you almost killed us," he tells her. But she won't look at him. "You and your precious lives," she says.

I mean...can't you just hear that woman? ( )
  Jinjer | Jul 19, 2021 |
I have slightly mixed feelings about this book. Objectively, it's excellent. The plot is fairly straightforward: a Brooklyn woman works in a library, helps answer listener letters for a former mentor's podcast, is caught up in her family's problems, and becomes gradually more obsessed with disaster preparation.

It's a short novel. 200pp doesn't do justice to that as it's physically small and there's quite a bit of white space. That's not merely an aesthetic choice; it accentuates the staccato, slightly choppy style. Overall, the feeling is of a novel that's been stripped down to its basic elements and polished. There's no excess to it, no fat. Each sentence is carefully written without an unnecessary word. As a piece of writing, it's really superbly done--despite the spareness, it's not at all flat and is often very funny.

So what are my qualms? I understand the point of this style of novel, but I don't feel it in my heart. It also suffers from the burden of overpraise, which is really an unfair thing to do to a book. But it would also be unfair for me to hold it against Offill that critics have called her (and Rachel Cusk) the future of fiction. ( )
  arosoff | Jul 11, 2021 |
I guess the idea is she leverages that she doesn’t like anything into this way to be funny, since humor is usually (practically always) a sort of sport, an attack—all that pain of living crying out to be papered over. So she’s like a mundane Douglas Adams. I guess that explains whether you’d like it, I don’t know if.... Well, not so much, I like solving racism better than throwing up your hands and comically huffing off, but.... I don’t know, it’s just me, right. Not everybody feels up to it, right.

.... I was thinking of quoting and commenting, but she doesn’t seem attached enough to what she’s saying, doesn’t care enough I feel like, to make it worth it. It is interesting that she (the updated Douglas Adams) hates Buddhism and technology as much as Republicans and evangelical Christians—fair, I guess. If probably stupid.

And that’s the book for me. Interesting, but stupid. I guess you could reverse the clauses if you wanted to, but that would be pedantic, even for me.

…. It’s nice to have something so unmarked to read in public, though, especially since I don’t need to always read big high stuff. “What are you reading?” Black Eurasian civil rights mythology. “Oh, just a novel. A comedy.” Neat. Like on TV.

Yeah, I just figured I’d buy a little novel by a white girl. She’s pretty.

…. But for making fun of vegetarians, I will issue a fatwa against her. That will be our break-up song.

…. It’s not her fault that religious people are crazy though. “Would you accept a world with extraordinary human goodness but no ethereal divine love?” “Sure!” It’s funny, because it’s hyper-spiritual. Divine love enables extraordinary human goodness; (and even if one form of unaided human love were better than another, if you take God you don’t please him by negating humanity, blocking it all out like a theologian with a commercial, the set’s not even on to begin with, not that TV is so great, but they used to hate Dickens, probably still would if he were popular…. But you don’t strengthen God by negating humanity; that’s something I believe very strongly); it’s this weird brag to say, I’d rather have hell with Christ than heaven with Satan! You know. Ultimately that wouldn’t happen…. And I guess more importantly the Standard American Christian she’s roasting doesn’t want the poor with Mother Theresa, you know. They just want this weird hyper-spiritual brag about how they don’t really want happiness, and hyper-nominal brag that they don’t want goodness, unless it comes from their American god.

As a typical comedian her engagement is pretty superficial but I guess it’s my fault because I knew that she was going to do religion in this way, right, from the epigraph, which interested me. I didn’t want God’s own fatwa against the Mexicans, right.

…. I guess that the thing about Trump people is that many of them just don’t know. Maybe they want to know, but….

It’s the meat they eat, right.

…. I’m not too ascetic for a little fiction, sometimes a person does the right thing, sometimes it seems almost by accident, and you learn. On the other hand, I wouldn’t spend all my time on aimless talking novels, right. (At least she’s not a liar or a romantic, though.) Might make me sad, in the end.

…. Aimless talking, though, although that’s not me, it’s important to say that doesn’t make people, Not Good Enough. They just might not get everything, but that’s different.

(I can listen to people talk, you know.)

…. I’m not always earnest, you know. Sometimes I have fun. Sometimes I’m a duck, living on the lake. I fight with the goose.

But sometimes I’m earnest.

Incidentally I’m a vegetarian, which is living much lighter on the land, but I don’t consciously plan for a climate crisis or rely on it to give my life meaning. If lots of people die, maybe I’ll die too. If not, and we’re all muddling through, then I will too. But life is unsatisfactory the more you think about it, even if you have a lot more than you need. Most preindustrial life would be like a horror story for us, but people did it, so.

Disaster prepping isn’t really interesting to me. Even if there were a disaster with a die off and a new aristocracy and all the rest of it, much of it would probably still be people whose relative had been a banker or a singer or something, not a random person who read disaster prep books and got to prove that they were intelligent by joining a new frontier elite. I don’t really envy a new frontier elite, honestly; I think it’s overrated. Spiritually it seems like it would be either a great bother or a great evil.

Of note perhaps though is that as a comic I took her to be a sort of Douglas Adams atheist, but by the end, given how many monk quotes there are, I wonder if she might be more of a Jonathan Haidt atheist with a measure of admiration if not belief. (Some people weren’t created with a believer’s personality.) It’s impossible to tell whether the monk quotes are held out for curiosity, scorn, or admiration. I suppose that’s the way of things.
  goosecap | Jun 24, 2021 |
Offill’s book is a sort of stream of consciousness novel with humorous and clever anecdotes mainly about her relatives. Parts of a bit difficult to follow and the entertainment value is probably determined by the reader’s experience with this kind of literature. Personally, it wasn’t my cup of tea, but I don’t fault Offill for that. I’m sure many readers love this kind of writing. The book is very short and can be read in one sitting. ( )
  DanDiercks | Jun 14, 2021 |
Enjoyed this, but not blown away. ( )
  libraryhead | Jun 14, 2021 |
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Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Jenny Offillautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Gall, JohnDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Gray318Designer da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Walz, MelanieTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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"Lizzie Benson slid into her job as a librarian without a traditional degree. But this gives her a vantage point from which to practice her other calling: she is a fake shrink. For years, she has tended to her God-haunted mother and her recovering addict brother. They have both stabilized for the moment, but Lizzie has little chance to spend her new free time with husband and son before her old mentor, Sylvia Liller, makes a proposal. She's become famous for her prescient podcast, Hell and High Water, and wants to hire Lizzie to answer the mail she receives: from left-wingers worried about climate change and right wingers worried about the decline of western civilization. As Lizzie dives into this polarized world, she begins to wonder what it means to keep tending your own garden once you've seen the flames beyond its walls. When her brother becomes a father and Sylvia a recluse, Lizzie is forced to address the limits of her own experience--but still she tries to save everyone, using everything she's learned about empathy and despair, conscience and collusion, from her years of wandering the library stacks . . . And all the while the voices of the city keep floating in--funny, disturbing, and increasingly mad"--

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