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Midnight's Children (1981)

de Salman Rushdie

Outros autores: Veja a seção outros autores.

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaConversas / Menções
13,936244421 (4.04)1 / 1017
The iconic masterpiece of India that introduced the world to "a glittering novelist--one with startling imaginative and intellectual resources, a master of perpetual storytelling" (The New Yorker) WINNER OF THE BEST OF THE BOOKERS * SOON TO BE A NETFLIX ORIGINAL SERIES   Selected by the Modern Library as one of the 100 best novels of all time * The twenty-fifth anniversary edition, featuring a new introduction by the author Saleem Sinai is born at the stroke of midnight on August 15, 1947, the very moment of India's independence. Greeted by fireworks displays, cheering crowds, and Prime Minister Nehru himself, Saleem grows up to learn the ominous consequences of this coincidence. His every act is mirrored and magnified in events that sway the course of national affairs; his health and well-being are inextricably bound to those of his nation; his life is inseparable, at times indistinguishable, from the history of his country. Perhaps most remarkable are the telepathic powers linking him with India's 1,000 other "midnight's children," all born in that initial hour and endowed with magical gifts. This novel is at once a fascinating family saga and an astonishing evocation of a vast land and its people-a brilliant incarnation of the universal human comedy. Twenty-five years after its publication, Midnight' s Children stands apart as both an epochal work of fiction and a brilliant performance by one of the great literary voices of our time.… (mais)
  1. 130
    Cem Anos de Solidão de Gabriel Garcia Marquez (Nickelini)
  2. 71
    The God of Small Things de Arundhati Roy (GoST)
  3. 61
    The Tin Drum de Günter Grass (GabrielF, CGlanovsky)
    GabrielF: I think Rushdie based a lot of his style in Midnight's Children on The Tin Drum. Both books are historical epics told through the perspective of a child with strange powers.
    CGlanovsky: A boy bound to the destiny of his birthplace. Surreal elements.
  4. 41
    The Satanic Verses de Salman Rushdie (BGP)
  5. 20
    Train to Pakistan de Khushwant Singh (pamelad)
    pamelad: Also set during Partition.
  6. 21
    The Master and Margarita de Mikhail Bulgakov (BGP)
  7. 10
    Kim de Rudyard Kipling (Gregorio_Roth)
    Gregorio_Roth: The book is a modern interpretation of KIM in a number of ways. I think it will complete your point of view on Imperialism and India.
  8. 10
    A Fine Balance de Rohinton Mistry (Cecrow)
  9. 11
    The Moor's Last Sigh de Salman Rushdie (wrmjr66)
    wrmjr66: I think The Moor's Last Sigh is Rushdie's best book since Midnight's Children.
  10. 01
    Island of a Thousand Mirrors de Nayomi Munaweera (evilmoose)
  11. 03
    The House of the Spirits de Isabel Allende (amyblue)
1980s (4)
Asia (16)
AP Lit (138)
hopes (11)
1960s (231)
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» Veja também 1017 menções

Inglês (228)  Espanhol (3)  Francês (3)  Holandês (2)  Italiano (1)  Sueco (1)  Hebraico (1)  Finlandês (1)  Polonês (1)  Tcheco (1)  Dinamarquês (1)  Todos os idiomas (243)
Mostrando 1-5 de 243 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
The literary map of India has to be redrawn... 'Midnight's Children' sounds like a continent finding its voice. ( )
  Rasaily | May 8, 2024 |
Saleem Sinai is born at the very stroke of midnight on the first day of India’s Independence from British rule. But he is only one of 1,000 other children born in the first hour of India’s freedom. And all of the children are gifted with supernatural powers, Saleem with a telepathic power to connect with and channel each of his brothers and sisters of freedom. Saleem’s life, his family’s history, and the lives of [Midnight’s Children] mirror the turbulent story of India.

I would never have ever picked up a Salman Rushdie book if not for the 100 best lists that I have been reading through over the years. Rushdie is such a polarizing figure, with a jihadist bounty on his head for offending an Ayatollah, he grinds through wives and women and is always ready to comment on anything to anyone. For example, the top search result for him just this minute is the following quote:
The world is full of things that upset people. But most of us deal with it and move on and don’t try and burn the planet down. There is no right in the world not to be offended. That right simply doesn’t exist. In a free society, an open society, people have strong opinions, and these opinions very often clash. In a democracy, we have to learn to deal with this.
Whether he offends you or not, and he’s offended many, Rushdie is a master and I’m glad I didn’t miss this book.

Told in a sort of rabbit-trail stream of consciousness, the narrative begins by telling Saleem’s family history first, beginning with his grandparents. Gazing at the past through a long lens in this way, Rushdie is able to ground his message of interconnectedness – who we are is a derivation of all our ancestral history and every event, no matter how insignificant, that plays a part in any life. Languid in its pace, the story never rushes to any conclusion or climax – our narrator, the hero of the story, is not even born until well after the first 100 pages of the book. Every detail of each character’s life and motivation is pondered on and explored. And the result is a rich, succulent epic that is never tiresome.

[Midnight’s Children] has been categorized as a magical realism story – one that blends the magical with the real. Whether that is an accurate characterization depends on your view of Saleem’s narrative, as he repeatedly admits to being an unreliable narrator. Is Saleem telling the truth about the powers of his compatriots and the mystical events that often plague him? Or is he processing the tragic and difficult history of his home with the fantastical to make it more palatable. Saleem would simply say, “It happened that way because that’s how it happened.”

Don’t be frightened by Rushdie’s polarizing personality. [Midnight’s Children] is a good old-fashioned story-telling. There are political and social implications to the story, but Rushdie doesn’t force an agenda, he just tells Saleem’s story. And don’t be put-off by the cultural milieu of this story. Unless you’re from India or are a scholar on Indian history, there will be much in the book that is strange and indecipherable. But the history and culture are not important; they are simply different colors or tastes in a familiar and common story.

Bottom Line: A rich epic of India, but also just a good-old fashioned well-told story, recognizable to anyone, anywhere.

5 bones!!!!!
A Favorite for the Year. ( )
1 vote blackdogbooks | Apr 27, 2024 |
Rushdie is a genius. This is his finest book. Six stars. ( )
  ben_r47 | Feb 22, 2024 |
Chosen as the Booker Prize winner of all Booker Prize winners. Magical realism in India and Pakistan. Not for me, for some reason. It took me forever to read this. ( )
  markm2315 | Jul 1, 2023 |
More on magical realism. And then some. There is some truth in the idea that any banned author is worth reading. If you don’t believe me, re-read Calvino (above), and then we can talk. ( )
  Kiramke | Jun 27, 2023 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 243 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Midnight's Children is a teeming fable of postcolonial India, told in magical-realist fashion by a telepathic hero born at the stroke of midnight on the day the country became independent. First published in 1981, it was met with little immediate excitement.
adicionado por mikeg2 | editarThe Guardian, Lindesay Irvine (Jul 10, 2008)
 

» Adicionar outros autores (29 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Rushdie, Salmanautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Capriolo, EttoreTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Davidson, AndrewArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Desai, AnitaIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Gomes, Manuel JoãoTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Gregory, LyndamNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Häilä, ArtoTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Howard, IanArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Schuchart, MaxTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Versluys, MarijkeEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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Please distinguish among:

– Salman Rushdie's original 1981 novel, Midnight's Children;

– Rushdie's 1999 screenplay adaptation (with introduction) of the novel, having the same title; and

– The 2003 stage play, Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children, adapted for theater by Rushdie, Tim Supple and Simon Reade.

Thank you.
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The iconic masterpiece of India that introduced the world to "a glittering novelist--one with startling imaginative and intellectual resources, a master of perpetual storytelling" (The New Yorker) WINNER OF THE BEST OF THE BOOKERS * SOON TO BE A NETFLIX ORIGINAL SERIES   Selected by the Modern Library as one of the 100 best novels of all time * The twenty-fifth anniversary edition, featuring a new introduction by the author Saleem Sinai is born at the stroke of midnight on August 15, 1947, the very moment of India's independence. Greeted by fireworks displays, cheering crowds, and Prime Minister Nehru himself, Saleem grows up to learn the ominous consequences of this coincidence. His every act is mirrored and magnified in events that sway the course of national affairs; his health and well-being are inextricably bound to those of his nation; his life is inseparable, at times indistinguishable, from the history of his country. Perhaps most remarkable are the telepathic powers linking him with India's 1,000 other "midnight's children," all born in that initial hour and endowed with magical gifts. This novel is at once a fascinating family saga and an astonishing evocation of a vast land and its people-a brilliant incarnation of the universal human comedy. Twenty-five years after its publication, Midnight' s Children stands apart as both an epochal work of fiction and a brilliant performance by one of the great literary voices of our time.

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