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The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good…
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The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are… (original: 2018; edição: 2019)

de Greg Lukianoff (Autor), Jonathan Haidt (Autor)

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7752122,008 (4.12)16
A finalist for the 2018 National Book Critics Circle Award in Nonfiction A New York Times Notable Book  Bloomberg Best Book of 2018 The New York Times bestseller! Something has been going wrong on many college campuses in the last few years. Speakers are shouted down. Students and professors say they are walking on eggshells and are afraid to speak honestly. Rates of anxiety, depression, and suicide are rising--on campus as well as nationally. How did this happen? First Amendment expert Greg Lukianoff and social psychologist Jonathan Haidt show how the new problems on campus have their origins in three terrible ideas that have become increasingly woven into American childhood and education: What doesn't kill you makes you weaker; always trust your feelings; and life is a battle between good people and evil people. These three Great Untruths contradict basic psychological principles about well-being and ancient wisdom from many cultures.  Embracing these untruths--and the resulting culture of safetyism--interferes with young people's social, emotional, and intellectual development. It makes it harder for them to become autonomous adults who are able to navigate the bumpy road of life. Lukianoff and Haidt investigate the many social trends that have intersected to promote the spread of these untruths. They explore changes in childhood such as the rise of fearful parenting, the decline of unsupervised, child-directed play, and the new world of social media that has engulfed teenagers in the last decade. They examine changes on campus, including the corporatization of universities and the emergence of new ideas about identity and justice. They situate the conflicts on campus within the context of America's rapidly rising political polarization and dysfunction. This is a book for anyone who is confused by what is happening on college campuses today, or has children, or is concerned about the growing inability of Americans to live, work, and cooperate across party lines.… (mais)
Membro:JCU_CSSA
Título:The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are Setting Up a Generation for Failure
Autores:Greg Lukianoff (Autor)
Outros autores:Jonathan Haidt (Autor)
Informação:Penguin Books (2019), Edition: Illustrated, 352 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
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Etiquetas:Sr. Katherine's Office

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The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are Setting Up a Generation for Failure de Greg Lukianoff (2018)

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Mostrando 1-5 de 21 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
This seems like a right-wing book, doesn't it? What would you say if I told you that it was written by two self-described "left-leaning" Democrats? What would you think about me if I said that their chapter on Social Justice was one of the best I've ever read? :) *

This book was fascinating in many respects. Anyone thinking of going into higher education, or raising children that they hope will attend college, should consider reading this book. It covers some upcoming problems in higher education and the, often, unprepared students that enter it.

I believe that it also illustrates an issue that [b:Love Your Enemies: How Decent People Can Save America from the Culture of Contempt|39893128|Love Your Enemies How Decent People Can Save America from the Culture of Contempt|Arthur C. Brooks|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1545786246s/39893128.jpg|61722243] didn't quite cover. What if people don't want to listen or be loved? What if they want you to be their enemy? It also slightly addressed potential causes of mass shootings, depression, microaggressions, and the mob mentality that seems to be brewing in locations in the US (I loved their response to the response to the Neo-Nazi mob in 2017. It was spot on).

Being a fan of CBT and familiar with Burns, I was struck by their comments on the ways that society often reinforces negative patterns of thought. To be sure, I've found that many of the people I knew didn't do that, but society as a whole seems to. Perhaps that is just the side-effect of advertising.

It struggled in two areas. 1st: It overlooks one other facet that I feel worth examining in connection with mental health and emotional well-being--- Family structure. ** 2nd: I really didn't like the word "Coddling" in the title. It implies a negative pity--- which I don't think is called for because most people are, as the title goes on to say, doing these things with the best of intentions.

That being said, to tackle the topic as they do in the beginning is a brave endeavor. Especially given potential repercussions.


*Don't disown me Grandpa... ;) They do advocate for more conservatives on college campuses, but not for the reasons you'd think.

** See [b:Marriage and Caste in America: Separate and Unequal Families in a Post-Marital Age|773464|Marriage and Caste in America Separate and Unequal Families in a Post-Marital Age|Kay S. Hymowitz|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1348633250s/773464.jpg|759515], [b:The Home We Build Together: Recreating Society|1762994|The Home We Build Together Recreating Society|Jonathan Sacks|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1355037651s/1762994.jpg|1760990], and [b:Becoming Attached: First Relationships and How They Shape Our Capacity to Love|547830|Becoming Attached First Relationships and How They Shape Our Capacity to Love|Robert Karen|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1355921449s/547830.jpg|535088]. ( )
  OutOfTheBestBooks | Sep 24, 2021 |
In their landmark book and NYT bestseller, Greg Lukianoff and Jonathan Haidt present a compelling narrative against the 3 "great untruths" of our day. Across the educational institutions of America, a transformation has taken place over the past 5 years. Today’s young people are becoming more anxious and fragile. They are growing up less prepared to enter the workforce and face real world challenges. They authors attribute this to a plethora of causes and a culture of safetyism on the American campus. Haidt and Lukianoff weave various threads together and give us a glimpse of how this came to be. But more than that, they detail the impact this is having on students. And this is of great relevance to educators, parents, and teachers.

In part 1, Lukianoff and Haidt present three great untruths. They are three ideas which are "so out of tune with human flourishing that they harm anyone who embraces them" (125). They contradict both ancient wisdom and the scientific findings in the modern era as well. However, these three ideas are fast becoming today's generally accepted conventional wisdom. Lukianoff and Haidt are attempting to shed light on the issues at hand. Presenting research from psychology and cognitive behavioral therapy, they help the reader understand why these three great untruths are so detrimental. For each to be considered a great untruth, they must contradict ancient wisdom, contradict modern psychological research on flourishing, and harm the individuals and communities that embrace it.

The first idea is the untruth of fragility: what doesn't kill you makes you weaker. This one may come up the most often in the book and the authors cover it in detail. The term "safety" has undergone "concept creep" to include anything emotionally discomforting. They believe this strategy has backfired and makes students more fragile and less resilient. There is a problem when safety becomes a sacred value, trumping other tradeoffs, practical or moral concerns, no matter what the level of danger is.

The second idea is the untruth of emotional reasoning: always trust your feelings. The great untruth of emotional reasoning encourages people to think of possible slights, microaggressions, and underlying assumptions hidden in other's statements. Instead of trying to interpret in a generous, charitable way, this untruth teaches others to interpret in the worst possible way to root out systemic racism, misogyny, and other internal biases. The authors say that principal of charity, which means interpreting other people's statements in their best, most reasonable way, has largely disappeared in the last 5 years.

The third idea is the untruth of us versus them: life is a battle between good people and evil people. In this chapter, the authors present a few key thinkers like Marx, Marcuse, and Foucault who have shaped the current trends on the university campus. They also point out that intersectionality correctly highlights how members of groups do sometimes act cruelly and unjustly to preserve their power (68). But intersectionality also teaches individuals to identify with certain intersections of varying identities and contributes to an us vs. them mentality. There is less unification around what one group believes. Rather, it is unity around a shared enemy that often unites people today.

Part 2 examines the way these three great untruths have contributed to the massive chaos across the university campus in places such as California Berkeley and Evergreen State College. Massive rioting and damages occurred in both places. The protests were spurred by emotional reasoning and other cognitive distortions by those under the influence of the 3 great untruths.

Part 3 takes a view of six different threads that have enabled the rise of the cult of safetyism. These include the cycle of polarization in the political world, the rise of adolescent anxiety and depression, paranoid parenting, the decline of play, the bureaucracy of safetyism, and the quest for justice. Each one of these threads has contributed to the rise of the untruths into their place of prominence in our culture. For example, anxiety and depression make the 3 great untruths seem like good options. If you are a person prone to anxiety, the protective elements in the 3 great untruths would seem like worthwhile efforts to reduce your anxiety. Preventing things in life that could cause a slight degree of discomfort would seem like a good idea in the short run. But in the long run, it short-circuits an individual's ability to deal with challenging ideas and become a more resilient person. Focusing one's energy on removing discomfort externally takes the locus of control out of the person's hands and places it squarely on outside circumstances.

I have a few disagreements with the book on the whole. For example, Haidt and Lukianoff propose that the human mind progressively evolved over time which is the reason for our quick association with an us vs. them mentality. This is a point I would contest. I do agree that the human beings tends to tribalize other groups, but disagree that this is a process of an evolutionary endeavor. I don't think the brain evolved to be this way, but this us vs. them mentality is a product of the flesh and sin nature embedded within man as a fallen son of Adam. Also, CBT is presented as the penultimate savior. It stands as the catch all remedy for the three great untruths at nearly every turn. While identifying cognitive distortions is necessary, I think it is overhyped. Despite these differing views, I found that the book was really insightful. I think the trends they highlighted are becoming more and more prevalent. ( )
  joshcrouse3 | Sep 17, 2021 |
This book started out well. It deals with many of the changes occurring in our society, and especially on campus, as the latest generation grows up to expect an environment where they are never offended or have their beliefs challenged. The authors write well, and detail the problems with excellent insight. It's too bad that, in their discussion of the Great Untruths passed on by adults, that they perpetrate a great untruth themselves: the untruth that no one can hurt us unless we allow them to. A socially acceptable form of victim blaming, they repeat this in close to every chapter. In addition, they are wearing blinders or are somewhat naive. In discussing why young girls have a high suicide attempt rate, they miss the most obvious reason, one frequently stated by the young women: the crap that they get every day on social media sites they are afraid to depart for fear of losing all their social life. The level of misogyny and violent threats is barely noted in the book. In addition, they seem to think the best time in the US was the period from FDR to the early 1960s, and since then, things have become too focused on "identity". In short, the best thing of all is when white men rule unchallenged, women remain in the home with few economic, social, or political rights, and people of color are segregated. I suspect this isn't really what they meant from other things they say, but in the end, the message is loud and clear. Especially when they use a couple of Title IX examples to represent poor thinking, when they don't have any data to support their position, and there is a lot of data to support the opposite position - that women are being kept out of many areas of life by misogyny, not by lack of interest. It is a common thing I see in books on critical thinking; they will do a beautiful job until they come to one particular spot, and then it all falls apart. Overall, a worthwhile book, but with significant flaws. ( )
  Devil_llama | Jun 3, 2021 |
"Words can cause stress, and therefore harm, but words are not violence. Speech is not violence."

Unfortunately, this quote is quite controversial in the world today. Many will disagree with it, and many more may slightly disagree with it. And what we're left with is a slow, chipping-away of mental fortitude. It's a fine line, I understand that, because verbal and emotional abuse is a real. What is needed is some gray area overlap but how much to include and how much to leave out is an ongoing point of contention. In our effort to protect the vulnerable, we're causing others to become even more vulnerable.

"Now, the commencement speakers will typically also wish you good luck and extend good wishes to you," Roberts said. "I will not do that, and I’ll tell you why. From time to time in the years to come, I hope you will be treated unfairly, so that you will come to know the value of justice. I hope that you will suffer betrayal because that will teach you the importance of loyalty."
- Chief Justice John Roberts, from a commencement speech he gave for his son's school graduation in 2017

Another concept I wholeheartedly agree with and practice whenever I can but never knew it had a formal definition is The Principle of Charity. From Wikipedia, "In philosophy and rhetoric, the principle of charity or charitable interpretation requires interpreting a speaker's statements in the most rational way possible and, in the case of any argument, considering its best, strongest possible interpretation." I love this idea because it invests the back-and-forth of argument with the best intentions to arrive at the best possible conclusion. But it requires enlightened, far-sighted thinking from at least one of the arguing parties for it to work well.

And to borrow one more quote from the book, "Strive to be a fire in the wind, not a candle." ( )
  Daniel.Estes | Mar 1, 2021 |
Thoughts and take-aways:

1. Excellent book, though disturbing. Published in 2017, but strangely prescient of political happenings in 2020/2021. It's not just adolescents who experience the myths described in the early chapters.
2. I'm struggling with what to *do* with this information. I want to engage with students on these topics and see if they agree. I want to push against the need for safety described in the book, but I don't know that it will do any good. ( )
  spothoven | Jan 26, 2021 |
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Prepare the child for the road, not the road for the child.

- FOLK WISDOM, origin unknown

Your worst enemy cannot harm you as much as your own thoughts, unguarded. But once mastered, no one can help you as much, not even your father or your mother.

- BUDDHA, Dhammapada

The line dividing good and evil cuts through the heart of every human being.

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This is a book about wisdom and its opposite.
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. . . a Great Untruth, which we laid out in the introductory chapter: it contradicts ancient wisdom, it contradicts modern psychological research on flourishing, and it harms the individuals and communities that embrace it.
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A finalist for the 2018 National Book Critics Circle Award in Nonfiction A New York Times Notable Book  Bloomberg Best Book of 2018 The New York Times bestseller! Something has been going wrong on many college campuses in the last few years. Speakers are shouted down. Students and professors say they are walking on eggshells and are afraid to speak honestly. Rates of anxiety, depression, and suicide are rising--on campus as well as nationally. How did this happen? First Amendment expert Greg Lukianoff and social psychologist Jonathan Haidt show how the new problems on campus have their origins in three terrible ideas that have become increasingly woven into American childhood and education: What doesn't kill you makes you weaker; always trust your feelings; and life is a battle between good people and evil people. These three Great Untruths contradict basic psychological principles about well-being and ancient wisdom from many cultures.  Embracing these untruths--and the resulting culture of safetyism--interferes with young people's social, emotional, and intellectual development. It makes it harder for them to become autonomous adults who are able to navigate the bumpy road of life. Lukianoff and Haidt investigate the many social trends that have intersected to promote the spread of these untruths. They explore changes in childhood such as the rise of fearful parenting, the decline of unsupervised, child-directed play, and the new world of social media that has engulfed teenagers in the last decade. They examine changes on campus, including the corporatization of universities and the emergence of new ideas about identity and justice. They situate the conflicts on campus within the context of America's rapidly rising political polarization and dysfunction. This is a book for anyone who is confused by what is happening on college campuses today, or has children, or is concerned about the growing inability of Americans to live, work, and cooperate across party lines.

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