Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Carregando...

Rise up women! The remarkable lives of the suffragettes (2018)

de Diane Atkinson

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
392500,607 (4.25)7
Almost one hundred years ago, British women led a hard-fought campaign to gain the right to vote--and this is their story. Britain's women's suffrage campaign began in the nineteenth century, but the twentieth century ushered in a more militant campaign. On June 30, 1908, two schoolteachers broke windows at 10 Downing Street to protest being turned away from Parliament, and when Parliament dissolved without passing the Conciliation Bill, the Women's Social and Political Union (W.S.P.U.) led the Black Friday riot on November 18, 1910. Two years later, Ellen Pitfield set fire to a waste basket at the General Post Office and was sentenced to six months for arson. By 1913, suffragettes were winning public sympathy by citing harrowing stories of imprisoned women on hunger strikes being drugged with bromide and force fed. During the First World War women had done many of the jobs previously done by men, and their vital work was rewarded politically by the Representation of the People Act, giving the vote to all women twenty-one years or older. It was passed in the House of Lords on June 19, 1917, and became law on February 6, 1918. Perhaps the ultimate victory was a law passed on November 21, 1918, that allowed women to stand as Members of Parliament in the next general election.… (mais)
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 7 menções

Exibindo 2 de 2
Rise Up, Women! :The Remarkable Lives of the Suffragettes
By Diane Atkinson
2017
Bloomsbury

Comprehensive and thoroughly researched, this 600+ page history of the campaign for Votes for Women in Great Britain between 1903-1914.
Formed by the infamous Parkhurst sisters, the WSPU (Womens Social and Political Union) followed the Independant Labour Party. Selling pamphlets, newspapers they eventually expanded and moved from Manchester to London in 1906. The Suffragists were often targeted and arrested on trivial charges and given sentences from 1 day to several months, many arrested numerous times. In 1908 the colors of purple, white and green were used to symbolize a Suffragette. In 1909 The Womens
Exhibition in Knightsbridge lasted 2 weeks, with speeches, demonstrations and marches against the Bill of Rights. Jailed Suffragettes began hunger strikes and were force fed, often through the nose, until the women became so frail they were released for fear they would die while in their care. And 'Black Friday', November 18, 1910 when 150 women were physically and sexually assaulted by police at a now famous protest against Winston Churchill .....and many more events are chronicled in the fascinating and beautifully written history. There are many B&W photos throughout the book.
Powerful...Remarkable...highly recommendationed. Excellent notes, as well! ( )
  over.the.edge | Aug 13, 2018 |
Rise up Women! – A Fantastic Chronicle of the Fight for Women’s Suffrage

It is 100 years ago that some women finally gained the vote, after years of fighting for the right to do so. 110 years ago, this year close to half a million-people gathered in Hyde Park, London, and celebrated “Women’s Sunday”. This was a peaceful, good humoured event that still did not persuade the Members of Parliament or the Government to extend the franchise to women. Peaceful campaigning had gained nothing in the fight for suffrage, others began to look at other ways to protest.

Today, even as someone has studied history and both undergraduate and post-graduate level, I had forgotten the humiliation that the suffragettes suffered. When you listen to the government today lecturing the world about democracy, one just to look back at how women were treated, and all they wanted was the vote.

Diane Atkinson has managed to bring this to the fore, with her brilliantly written and researched Rise Up Women! She brings some clarity and honesty to the vitriol the suffragettes faced, as the white middle-class and upper-class males protected their monopoly on the levers of power.

What comes through this excellent volume is the power of the bloody difficult women who continued to challenge the establishment and at the same time changed the perception of women, for the better, before the war in 1914.

I must admit I do like the riposte Kitty Marion gave to the magistrate, who has said women may get the vote if they behaved, Marion replied “Men don’t always behave properly and they the vote.” When one thinks what these men did to the suffragettes is unforgiveable, force-feeding with maximum violence. Nose and throats widened with knives to insert the unwashed feeding tubes.

It must never be forgotten that by 1903 seven countries, among them two countries in the Empire, Australia and New Zealand, had some form of female suffrage. It was Emmeline Pankhurst, Mancunian social reformer and her three daughters who founded the Women’s Social and Political Union in October 1903, that Atkinson rightly begins with, after discussing the previous reform acts.

From here Atkinson gives a voice to the hundreds of unsung women who fought and supported the suffragette campaign. While Atkinson gives as many women as possible a voice, it can sometimes feel like an encyclopaedia, and it is the first encyclopaedia I have read cover to cover and enjoyed.

What does scream out from every page is the sheer bloody mindedness of the women, the courage of large numbers of women campaigners. It also reminds us of the disgusting brutality by the government and their agents of violence, the police against the women. The so-called national hero, Winston Churchill, when Home Secretary, told the police to “throw the women around from one to the other.”

Sometimes history is never straightforward, leaves some questions unanswered, and those answers we do get are not necessarily easy or pleasant. The research that went in to this book and the accounts relayed reminds us that the battle for female suffrage was not easy, pleasant.

This is a wonderful book, totally engrossing read, and with over 600 pages to read and digest, an education and a reminder of what we have now and that work still needs to be done. ( )
  atticusfinch1048 | Mar 8, 2018 |
Exibindo 2 de 2
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Epígrafe
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
We hand the key to the coming generations to unlock the door to Freedom and Equal Opportunity. It is for them to campaign for and bring to glorious fruition the great reforms we dreamed of, but being voteless women, were unable to negotiate.

Jessie Stephenson typescript, ‘No Other Way’ (1932)
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
For Patrick Hughes
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

Almost one hundred years ago, British women led a hard-fought campaign to gain the right to vote--and this is their story. Britain's women's suffrage campaign began in the nineteenth century, but the twentieth century ushered in a more militant campaign. On June 30, 1908, two schoolteachers broke windows at 10 Downing Street to protest being turned away from Parliament, and when Parliament dissolved without passing the Conciliation Bill, the Women's Social and Political Union (W.S.P.U.) led the Black Friday riot on November 18, 1910. Two years later, Ellen Pitfield set fire to a waste basket at the General Post Office and was sentenced to six months for arson. By 1913, suffragettes were winning public sympathy by citing harrowing stories of imprisoned women on hunger strikes being drugged with bromide and force fed. During the First World War women had done many of the jobs previously done by men, and their vital work was rewarded politically by the Representation of the People Act, giving the vote to all women twenty-one years or older. It was passed in the House of Lords on June 19, 1917, and became law on February 6, 1918. Perhaps the ultimate victory was a law passed on November 21, 1918, that allowed women to stand as Members of Parliament in the next general election.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Links rápidos

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (4.25)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 1
3.5
4 1
4.5
5 2

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 157,751,579 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível