Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Carregando...

What You Are Getting Wrong about Appalachia (2018)

de Elizabeth Catte

Outros autores: Veja a seção outros autores.

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1939108,910 (3.83)4
An insider's perspective on Appalachia, and a frank, ferocious assessment of America's recent fascination with the people and the problems of the region."In 2016 headlines declared Appalachia ground zero for America's "forgotten tribe" of white working-class voters. Following the presidential election, demystifying Appalachia and locating the roots of its dysfunction quickly seemed to become a national industry, shoring up the success of J.D. Vance's memoir Hillbilly Elegy and the author's rise to fame as the media's favorite working-class whisperer. With 'What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia, ' Elizabeth Catte offers a much-needed perspective on Appalachia, and a frank, ferocious assessment of America's recent fascination with the people and problems of the region summed up in shorthand as 'Trump Country'"--Back cover.… (mais)
Nenhum(a)
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 4 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 9 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
A compact and powerful rebuttal to Hillbilly Elegy, a book which I uncomfortably recognise I was taken in by to a certain extent—I recognised some of the weaknesses of J.D. Vance's work, but not all of them, and I didn't know that he consorts with eugenicists. (Or, as I see after a quick search, one who coyly flirts with white nationalism. Gross.)

Unlike Vance, Elizabeth Catte isn't just of Appalachian descent but from Appalachia and a trained historian, and uses her knowledge of both the region and the past to neatly dismantle many of Vance's claims, and to show the flaws in many popular media appraisals of his work. However, there are points where Catte slips into a more academic style of prose, one which I know historians are trained into and which can alienate a non-academic audience, and that sits oddly alongside the more polemical portions of the book. ( )
  siriaeve | Dec 14, 2020 |
Brief, but illuminating ( )
  kitlovestea | Oct 20, 2020 |
I'm all riled up and I have a bit of pity for whomever ends up as the target for all this righteous feeling.

I can definitely see the points other reviews make about needing a fairly high level of knowledge for the references and ideas to be accessible and I can also say the manuscript could have used another pass by a copy editor or anyone familiar with the correct name of Lexington's newspaper. But! Those faults are absolutely minuscule when compared to the fire contained in this little book. If you come to the end of the book and find you still have questions about what we, collectively as a nation that has rewarded JD Vance to such staggering extents, get wrong about Appalachia, I'd say you've missed the point entirely. And that's on you.

I must be feeling righteous, indeed. ( )
  mmsmcetc | Sep 17, 2020 |
To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like. A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white photos of...weird poor people. Nice white people could talk about how awful it all is and how they wish they could do something about it. (Pass the organic vegan caviar, please.)

What did I 'know' about Appalachia before I read this? Image one: said black and white pictures. Image two: fiddle music. Image three: Deliverance. So yeah, not just fiddles, banjoes too.

As a consequence of this, if somebody had asked me, I would have guessed that Appalachia was small. It fits the homogeneity of the sense of the place. See? Place. Place is small. It's a thing that's clearly identifiable. Wrong word. Wrong, wrong, wrong.

One of the first things I found out, opening this small book, is that Appalachia is huge, encompassing many States and many millions of people. It would seem obvious, just from that fact, that it isn't going to be homogeneous. This book is out to fight that, explaining how it has happened so that you understand why you've been duped.

It's sort of an enraged lament, explaining the process of how we got to a particular point in US history which I hadn't heard of before I read this book. Hillbilly Elegy. On Goodreads over 60 of my friends have read it, compared with a tally of four for this volume. Let's lament just a little louder then, as we realise how many people have bought into the prejudice of Vance's best seller.

There is a book coming out soon, Unwhite: Appalachia, Race and Film by Meredith McCarroll who says “Its central argument is that Appalachian people in cinema have been portrayed as phenotypically white, but using the same tropes that have long been used to portray non-whites in film.” If only that were it, films getting it wrong. The heartbreaking point of Catte's volume is that this is a universal tendency, founded long ago, entrenched by those whose interests are served by it, and supported by the academic community which might largely hang its collective head in shame.

One of the more wrenching moments of a book which is full of them, is to find out that at Catte's alma mater, not only has Hillbilly Elegy become required reading, but it has been put together with a deal to buy one of those books of photos which maintains the false image. For Catte on Hillbilly Elegy, which will give you a taste of What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia go here. Eugenicists like Vance's message. It makes you wonder what sort of educational culture presides in the US of A.

This is no reference book. It's venting spleen, written in a way I assume she would not write with her historian's cap on. There are no references, but a detailed reading list for where to go next. In a short, small form, it succinctly puts the reader in the shoes of those who live in this vast area. She makes you part of the action as she describes the long history of labour fighting capitalism, of capitalism cozying up with the academic sociologists and such like, of environmentalists - that is to say, ordinary people turned into activists by their foes - fighting for the preservation of the sweetness of the mountain areas as they are destroyed by coal production, amongst other evils. You watch the pregnant woman next to you being kicked by strike breakers. You watch sociologists agreeing with capitalists who want people off their own land, that it is for their own good to take them from their homes. You watch ordinary people being literally defined as cases for forced sterilisation because it makes it a moral imperative to take them from their homes, whether that be to rip mountains apart to mine coal, or to preserve areas for rich white people to take their vacations.

If you want a nuanced, if angry, view of this exploited expanse of the US, this is an excellent place to start, and it will guide you as to where to go next. ( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
To begin with a mea culpa. Even though I knew Catte was fighting against the stereotypes, I still expected this book to be a sort of coffee table book one might find described in Stuff White People Like. A sumptuous publication in large format comprising artistic black and white photos of...weird poor people. Nice white people could talk about how awful it all is and how they wish they could do something about it. (Pass the organic vegan caviar, please.)

What did I 'know' about Appalachia before I read this? Image one: said black and white pictures. Image two: fiddle music. Image three: Deliverance. So yeah, not just fiddles, banjoes too.

As a consequence of this, if somebody had asked me, I would have guessed that Appalachia was small. It fits the homogeneity of the sense of the place. See? Place. Place is small. It's a thing that's clearly identifiable. Wrong word. Wrong, wrong, wrong.

One of the first things I found out, opening this small book, is that Appalachia is huge, encompassing many States and many millions of people. It would seem obvious, just from that fact, that it isn't going to be homogeneous. This book is out to fight that, explaining how it has happened so that you understand why you've been duped.

It's sort of an enraged lament, explaining the process of how we got to a particular point in US history which I hadn't heard of before I read this book. Hillbilly Elegy. On Goodreads over 60 of my friends have read it, compared with a tally of four for this volume. Let's lament just a little louder then, as we realise how many people have bought into the prejudice of Vance's best seller.

There is a book coming out soon, Unwhite: Appalachia, Race and Film by Meredith McCarroll who says “Its central argument is that Appalachian people in cinema have been portrayed as phenotypically white, but using the same tropes that have long been used to portray non-whites in film.” If only that were it, films getting it wrong. The heartbreaking point of Catte's volume is that this is a universal tendency, founded long ago, entrenched by those whose interests are served by it, and supported by the academic community which might largely hang its collective head in shame.

One of the more wrenching moments of a book which is full of them, is to find out that at Catte's alma mater, not only has Hillbilly Elegy become required reading, but it has been put together with a deal to buy one of those books of photos which maintains the false image. For Catte on Hillbilly Elegy, which will give you a taste of What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia go here. Eugenicists like Vance's message. It makes you wonder what sort of educational culture presides in the US of A.

This is no reference book. It's venting spleen, written in a way I assume she would not write with her historian's cap on. There are no references, but a detailed reading list for where to go next. In a short, small form, it succinctly puts the reader in the shoes of those who live in this vast area. She makes you part of the action as she describes the long history of labour fighting capitalism, of capitalism cozying up with the academic sociologists and such like, of environmentalists - that is to say, ordinary people turned into activists by their foes - fighting for the preservation of the sweetness of the mountain areas as they are destroyed by coal production, amongst other evils. You watch the pregnant woman next to you being kicked by strike breakers. You watch sociologists agreeing with capitalists who want people off their own land, that it is for their own good to take them from their homes. You watch ordinary people being literally defined as cases for forced sterilisation because it makes it a moral imperative to take them from their homes, whether that be to rip mountains apart to mine coal, or to preserve areas for rich white people to take their vacations.

If you want a nuanced, if angry, view of this exploited expanse of the US, this is an excellent place to start, and it will guide you as to where to go next. ( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 9 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha

» Adicionar outros autores

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Elizabeth Catteautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Pangrace, MeredithDesignerautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Wilson, DavidCover designer and artistautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Lugares importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

An insider's perspective on Appalachia, and a frank, ferocious assessment of America's recent fascination with the people and the problems of the region."In 2016 headlines declared Appalachia ground zero for America's "forgotten tribe" of white working-class voters. Following the presidential election, demystifying Appalachia and locating the roots of its dysfunction quickly seemed to become a national industry, shoring up the success of J.D. Vance's memoir Hillbilly Elegy and the author's rise to fame as the media's favorite working-class whisperer. With 'What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia, ' Elizabeth Catte offers a much-needed perspective on Appalachia, and a frank, ferocious assessment of America's recent fascination with the people and problems of the region summed up in shorthand as 'Trump Country'"--Back cover.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Links rápidos

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.83)
0.5
1
1.5
2 2
2.5 2
3 6
3.5 4
4 8
4.5 1
5 9

GenreThing

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 160,209,900 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível