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The tattooist of Auschwitz de Heather Morris
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The tattooist of Auschwitz (original: 2018; edição: 2018)

de Heather Morris

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
3,3581742,962 (3.91)73
"In April 1942, Lale Sokolov, a Slovakian Jew, is forcibly transported to the concentration camps at Auschwitz-Birkenau. When his captors discover that he speaks several languages, he is put to work as a Tätowierer (the German word for tattooist), tasked with permanently marking his fellow prisoners. Imprisoned for more than two and a half years, Lale witnesses horrific atrocities and barbarism--but also incredible acts of bravery and compassion. Risking his own life, he uses his privileged position to exchange jewels and money from murdered Jews for food to keep his fellow prisoners alive. One day in July 1942, Lale, prisoner 32407, comforts a trembling young woman waiting in line to have the number 34902 tattooed onto her arm. Her name is Gita, and in that first encounter, Lale vows to somehow survive the camp and marry her"--Dust jacket flap.… (mais)
Membro:Viamonte
Título:The tattooist of Auschwitz
Autores:Heather Morris
Informação:London : Zaffre, 2018.
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Fiction

Detalhes da Obra

The Tattooist of Auschwitz de Heather Morris (2018)

  1. 10
    Night de Elie Wiesel (Vicki-Hale)
    Vicki-Hale: Night is a story of a young boy surviving Auschwitz and other camps. Elie gives a heartbreaking inside look into life as a Jew in Nazi Germany
  2. 10
    The Boy in the Striped Pajamas de John Boyne (tina1969)
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Mostrando 1-5 de 180 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
If I didn't know better I would think, after reading this book, that with a little quick thinking and luck it was possible to survive in Auschwitz. What we have here is a romance novel set in a death camp. I wouldn't take issue if it was billed as "inspired" by a true story.. something to put it firmly in the fiction category. I've given it two stars because, as it's so popular, it reminds and possibly will help make a new generation aware of what happened. ( )
  suniru | Oct 13, 2021 |
This is a book that will stay with its reader for a long time, as it ponders the highs and lows of humanity and what it takes to survive. It is the story of Lale Sokolov, a survivor of Auschwitz/Birkenau and the woman he loved, Gita.

We meet Lale as he boards the train to Auschwitz, and experience the daily horrors he witnesses. This is a place where each day of survival is miracle, where prisoners get shot for sport, at officers' whim, or to ward off boredom. And those who are killed quickly with a gunshot are perhaps the lucky ones. Out of the millions of Jews, gypsies and other unfortunates who entered Auschwitz and never left it alive, Lale is distinguished by his will to survive.

To survive in this inhumane environment, one needs to rely on luck and small mercies. At times, Lale was helped along by fellow prisoners, but he also won favour with some Nazi officers, and some of the more prominent prisoners. In a place where the Nazis used one prisoner to torture another, tough choices need to be made, and Lale, along with others, had to make them in order to survive. To me, what is most interesting is that there is some ambiguity whether these choices are driven by kindness of pragmatism, but the humanity and tenacity of Lale cannot be diminished by his pragmatism. His love for Gita was a lifeline, because it gave him purpose for what he was doing.

Auschwitz/Birkenau is beyond awful. Its very existence is a condemnation of humanity and I understand why we need to remember and read about it. The appearances of people like Dr. Mengele and the descriptions of his crimes, the gas chambers and the crematoria touch the deepest and darkest abyss of human evil. To survive such evil, you need to inoculate yourself against it and perhaps borrow some of it. This reminds me of the yin-yang figure; the white has a spot of black in it, and the black also has a spot of white in it. One of the unsavory characters we are introduced to is the Nazi officers Baretsky. Lale has many exchanges with him, and we can read between the lines that Lale might have cultivated some sort of friendly relationship with him. This young officer, who was not an ethnic German, joined the Nazis for his own misguided reasons. Despite his evil behaviour, I thought that he had a touch of the desperate and needy to him . His end by suicide many years after the war, shows that he could not get away from his past. Lale himself was reluctant to tell his story because of the choices he made, he was lucky because he had Gita as a purpose, someone to save, so his quest was not totally a selfish one.

There are others whom he saved too, as he said, but whether saving them was an act of pure altruism or a strategy for survival, is not totally clear. I read some place that acting altruistically is an evolutionary strategy, and in Auschwitz it was the same, a primal strategy for survival. Lale was lucky for his choices might have ended differently. Silke, one of Gita's friends, a fellow prisoner who at one point saved Lale's life, thanks to her connection/affair of one of the officers, was condemned as a collaborator and spent nearly two decades in a Siberian prison. In the book she was portrayed as an unwilling participant in this affair, but who knows the darkness of a human heart.

Choices we make come always with consequences, but we cannot begrudge Lale those choices. He survived, and that alone was enough. And even if he did not identify totally as a Jew, he has shown true grit and chutzpah. I admire him for it.
But always when I read a difficult story like this one, I wounder how would it have played out for me. Perhaps I would have been like Gita, happy to have Lale look after me, or I would have been like his first friend, who saved him from the corpse cart, but did not make it himself. Or like the first tatooist who chose him for the job, or Leon his fellow tatooist both of whom never saw liberation. But most probably I would have been like Nadia the gypsy who walked meekly with her people to the gas chamber and then the crematorium. I think that all of the evil around me would have made me despair of humans and prefer the embrace of death.

The saddest and cruelest thing about the death camps is that the true angels, the children, the weak and the innocent never made it out of the camps alive. Those who did carried some of its evil with them, in scars and memories.
( )
  moukayedr | Sep 5, 2021 |
The book isn't easy to read. It describes a lot of horrors that, unfortunately, aren't just the author's imagination. They happened in real life.
Though some say that the author pictured fully only Lale's character and forgot about the others, but it is ok for me. As it's said in the author's note, Lale wanted Heather Morris not to add her own things to the story. So that's just what she did - told us as much as she was told.
Although it's a sad story, there are a lot of wonderful things here - friendship, support, sympathy, and love. That's why I enjoyed this story a lot. ( )
  Diana_Hryniuk | Aug 28, 2021 |
In my frequent browsing of the shelves in my local Waterstones I had noticed this a few times, mainly because of it's cover. Even though I do find books based around war interesting I never got to the point of picking it up and reading the blurb on the back for some reason. Then one day at work I got a little bored and decided to listen to a podcast while carrying out some admin tasks. The podcast was Simon Mayo's Books of the Year and one of the guests was the author of this book, Heather Morris. The interview really piqued my interest as I had no idea that he book is based on a series of interviews with someone who had spent time in Auschwitz. After hearing the interview I decided I had to read the book, especially as it was getting rave reviews

The story is a fascinating one, starting with the main character Lale as a young man. The war is going on but is in it's early days and although rumours have been circulating about the Nazis controlling Jews no one in his home country of Hungary seems to be overly concerned. A notice is sent out that every family is to send someone to work for the Nazis as part of the war effort. Lale sees no major danger about this and tells his family that he will go as he doesn't want to see his siblings being sent. Although he doesn't know it at the time this is the start of his journey to Auschwitz, a journey which will change his life forever.

There are 2 stories here, one is a story of survival and the other a love story. The story of survival is pretty self explanatory but does take a few interesting looks into survivors guilt and the limits of acceptable actions related to that survival. The love story adds a really human element to the story and involves Lale and another prisoner, Gita. Their love grows understandably slowly due to the constraints of camp life.

I can't really go into any more details without spoiling the story so I will stop here. I really enjoyed the book and pretty much read it in one sitting which is somewhat unusual for me. My only criticism is that I wish the writing was a little better. It's not bad, in fact it's perfectly fine but I think the story would have been even better with a slightly more literary touch. Perhaps a bit harsh on my part but I can only write what I feel. ( )
  Brian. | Jul 28, 2021 |
4 stars because the story of Lale and Gita is extraordinary, but unfortunately the writing is very poor. The writing gets only 1 star.

I have read so many holocaust stories with heavy heart and tears in my eyes. This story is by far one of the most incredible out of the lot but the author did a very poor job of conveying the emotions of the people. ( )
  Islandmum84 | Jul 28, 2021 |
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Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Morris, Heatherautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Sokolov, GaryPosfácioautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Armitage, RichardNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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To the memory of Lale Sokolov. Thank you for trusting me to tell your and Gita's story.
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Lale tries not to look up. (Prologue)
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He drops to his knees and dry retches. He has nothing to bring up; the only fluid in his body is tears.
Choosing to live is an act of defiance, a form of heroism.
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"In April 1942, Lale Sokolov, a Slovakian Jew, is forcibly transported to the concentration camps at Auschwitz-Birkenau. When his captors discover that he speaks several languages, he is put to work as a Tätowierer (the German word for tattooist), tasked with permanently marking his fellow prisoners. Imprisoned for more than two and a half years, Lale witnesses horrific atrocities and barbarism--but also incredible acts of bravery and compassion. Risking his own life, he uses his privileged position to exchange jewels and money from murdered Jews for food to keep his fellow prisoners alive. One day in July 1942, Lale, prisoner 32407, comforts a trembling young woman waiting in line to have the number 34902 tattooed onto her arm. Her name is Gita, and in that first encounter, Lale vows to somehow survive the camp and marry her"--Dust jacket flap.

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