Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines…
Carregando...

Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism (edição: 2018)

de Safiya Umoja Noble (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaConversas
3491156,640 (3.82)Nenhum(a)
A revealing look at how negative biases against women of color are embedded in search engine results and algorithms Run a Google search for "black girls"-what will you find? "Big Booty" and other sexually explicit terms are likely to come up as top search terms. But, if you type in "white girls," the results are radically different. The suggested porn sites and un-moderated discussions about "why black women are so sassy" or "why black women are so angry" presents a disturbing portrait of black womanhood in modern society. In Algorithms of Oppression, Safiya Umoja Noble challenges the idea that search engines like Google offer an equal playing field for all forms of ideas, identities, and activities. Data discrimination is a real social problem; Noble argues that the combination of private interests in promoting certain sites, along with the monopoly status of a relatively small number of Internet search engines, leads to a biased set of search algorithms that privilege whiteness and discriminate against people of color, specifically women of color. Through an analysis of textual and media searches as well as extensive research on paid online advertising, Noble exposes a culture of racism and sexism in the way discoverability is created online. As search engines and their related companies grow in importance-operating as a source for email, a major vehicle for primary and secondary school learning, and beyond-understanding and reversing these disquieting trends and discriminatory practices is of utmost importance.… (mais)
Membro:yrthroat
Título:Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism
Autores:Safiya Umoja Noble (Autor)
Informação:NYU Press (2018), Edition: Illustrated, 256 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:****
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Detalhes da Obra

Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism de Safiya Umoja Noble (Author)

Nenhum(a)
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

Mostrando 1-5 de 11 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
A thorough overview of the systematic biases in Google in particular, and many other web technologies in general, that adversely impact Black women in particular, and other marginalised groups in general. Because the general idea of this wasn't new to me some of the writing sometimes felt a bit repetitive but it was really good to have all the examples and the narrative tying it all together. And important that libraries don't get off scott-free, with biases embedded in their own classification systems! ( )
  zeborah | Feb 3, 2020 |
Although a solid summary of the larger problem of subtle bias in search engine results, this book promised much more in the way of explaining the source of that bias. Although the author recognizes and criticizes "the idea that it is not the search engine that is the problem but, rather, the users of search engines who are. It suggests that what is popular is simply what rises to the top of the search pile," she does not provide any information to distinguish between the two alternatives. She assumes that the problem is Google, and not Google users, without providing any foundation for that assumption, and frames the entire book in terms of this undefended conclusion. For example, she sees no difference between page results and query auto suggestions, but my understanding at least is that users are much more influential in the latter than the former.

I had hoped for some actual technical discussion of how page results are generated, and what aspects are under the control of Google and which are merely aggregating the preferences of actual users, but that never comes. It does not help that, for a book published in 2018, the bulk of her examples are ancient, often from 2011. The Internet, and Google with it, has changed drastically in the last seven years, but her discussion barely recognizes the fact. I suspect the first section of the book, with the very outdated examples, was the core of her 2012 dissertation, which has here been included with very little change or update. Later chapters attempt to bring in more recent issues, but they feel like quick glosses meant to fill out the need to expand the dissertation to book length, and lack the more serious consideration that went into the earlier section. In all honesty, she should have written an entirely new, current book rather than attempt to update the older material. She has the background to do that, but she is trapped by the confines of trying to publish the dissertation as is.

With more technical expertise, and data more contemporary to the date of publication, this could have been a more exciting contribution. Failing that, it is still interesting on the general points, if dusty and outmoded in the details. ( )
  dono421846 | Sep 23, 2019 |
Google as a fundamentally oppressive search engine, as expressed by the phrase in the introduction "technological redlining", noting especially Google's mistreatment of black women and girls in search results.

It's a scholarly work (for all of those limits). Readers will also like Bowker and Star's "Sorting Things Out: Classification and Its Consequences" (1999). ( )
  superpatron | Feb 25, 2019 |
Everyone should read this! ( )
  francesanngray | Feb 20, 2019 |
The problem with academic writing about the Internet is that it dates so quickly: unlike a popular nonfiction book, where you're frantically googling while reading to check on what's happened since the book came out, you're frantically googling to check on what's happened in the three years since the chapter you're reading went through peer review. I understand it's necessary, but it's intensely frustrating, especially when a book comes out in the awkward time frame this one did.

Still, there's some very good analysis here, on categorization and assumptions and the way systems that were created thoughtlessly can create and reinforce great harm. There's a lot to build on from here. ( )
  jen.e.moore | Aug 22, 2018 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 11 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
In her book, Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism, which was published by New York University Press this month, Noble delves into the ways search engines misrepresent a variety of people, concepts, types of information and knowledge. Her aim: to get people thinking and talking about the prominent role technology plays in shaping our lives and our future.

adicionado por superpatron | editarUSC Annenberg (Feb 16, 2018)
 

» Adicionar outros autores

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Noble, Safiya UmojaAutorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Hayward, NicoleDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

A revealing look at how negative biases against women of color are embedded in search engine results and algorithms Run a Google search for "black girls"-what will you find? "Big Booty" and other sexually explicit terms are likely to come up as top search terms. But, if you type in "white girls," the results are radically different. The suggested porn sites and un-moderated discussions about "why black women are so sassy" or "why black women are so angry" presents a disturbing portrait of black womanhood in modern society. In Algorithms of Oppression, Safiya Umoja Noble challenges the idea that search engines like Google offer an equal playing field for all forms of ideas, identities, and activities. Data discrimination is a real social problem; Noble argues that the combination of private interests in promoting certain sites, along with the monopoly status of a relatively small number of Internet search engines, leads to a biased set of search algorithms that privilege whiteness and discriminate against people of color, specifically women of color. Through an analysis of textual and media searches as well as extensive research on paid online advertising, Noble exposes a culture of racism and sexism in the way discoverability is created online. As search engines and their related companies grow in importance-operating as a source for email, a major vehicle for primary and secondary school learning, and beyond-understanding and reversing these disquieting trends and discriminatory practices is of utmost importance.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Links rápidos

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.82)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 1
2.5 1
3 11
3.5 3
4 18
4.5 1
5 10

GenreThing

No genres

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 160,394,701 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível