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Parable of the Sower

de Octavia E. Butler

Outros autores: Veja a seção outros autores.

Séries: Earthseed (1)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
5,0811531,565 (4.04)319
"Parable of the Sower is the Butlerian odyssey of one woman who is twice as feeling in a world that has become doubly dehumanized. The time is 2025. The place is California, where small walled communities must protect themselves from hordes of desperate scavengers and roaming bands of people addicted to a drug that activates an orgasmic desire to burn, rape, and murder. When one small community is overrun, Lauren Olamina, an 18 year old black woman with the hereditary train of "hyperempathy"--which causes her to feel others' pain as her own--sets off on foot along the dangerous coastal highways, moving north into the unknown"--… (mais)
Adicionado recentemente porbiblioteca privada, vidhi_t, kerryfine, MAR67, Keyarra, Krinsekatze, Justin828, babylona, ephemeralmochi, jmacccc
Bibliotecas HistóricasThomas C. Dent, Tim Spalding
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    The Fifth Sacred Thing de Starhawk (espertus)
    espertus: Another post-apocalyptic feminist novel, although unlike in Parable of the Sower, the religion/magic is real, not symbolic.
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    The Postman de David Brin (infiniteletters)
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    Mara and Dann de Doris Lessing (amberwitch)
    amberwitch: Both featuring young female protagonists of colour, traveling north looking for a place to live after her society disintegrated, partially due to climatical changes.
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    Parable of the Talents de Octavia E. Butler (sturlington)
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    When She Woke de Hillary Jordan (ellbeecee)
    ellbeecee: Near-future dystopian fiction that makes you consider what's going on and the various paths that could be taken.
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    Dhalgren de Samuel R. Delany (thesmellofbooks)
    thesmellofbooks: A very different dystopia written by a very different African-American science fiction writer. Yet the intensity and humanity of Parable of the Sower are present as well in this much older book.
  14. 00
    The Age of Miracles de Karen Thompson Walker (Othemts)
    Othemts: Young narrators observe the slow decline of society into dystopia as result of natural disasters.
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    Mind-Call de Wilanne Schneider Belden (infiniteletters)
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    How I Live Now de Meg Rosoff (wonderlake)
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  19. 24
    World War Z de Max Brooks (storyjunkie)
    storyjunkie: Both are tales of how to survive a world gone mad, though there are no zombies in Butler's. Both works' treatment of the human questions are equally nuanced, variable, and detailed.
  20. 13
    Bel Canto de Ann Patchett (the_awesome_opossum)
    the_awesome_opossum: Both novels are about human connections formed in the face of unusual crises. Very competent and well-written, both books had much the same vibe about them

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Mostrando 1-5 de 149 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
In author Octavia E. Butler's version of California in the mid-2020s, global warming has spiraled out of control. The relatively fortunate live in heavily-walled areas and pay through the nose for necessities such as water or police protection, while homeless people, drug addicts, and outlaws struggle to survive out in the no-man's-land beyond the walls. Lauren, a Black girl born into this crumbling civilization, tries to prepare for an even bleaker future by creating her own religion, which she calls Earthseed. As she and her ragtag group of friends hike up the coast on their way to Canada, she begins to attract followers.

Dystopian fiction is not my genre, and I had a hard time making it through Parable of the Sower, despite the well-deserved praise this novel has received. In Butler's telling, almost unimaginably horrific events occur on a regular basis. Parallels to slavery are abundant. The only hope is the unsteady light provided by Lauren's self-created religion. I am not a big fan of know-it-all teenagers who are the only ones who can save the world.

Still, someday, I may be curious enough to pick up the sequel. ( )
  akblanchard | Apr 22, 2021 |
If you like slow, thoughtful, complex dystopias... you’ll like Parable of the Sower.

Octavia E. Butler’s story of a world fallen to ruin feels like something that could still be in our near future. Those types of stories – the ones that are close enough to reality you get chills – are the best kind. They’re the sort you can indulge in and fear simultaneously. And they’re familiar enough not to feel outlandish. Butler’s world building is sublime in this way.

The characters are all fantastic and, for a change, mostly diverse. Parable of the Sower made a point of that diversity. It highlights the higher levels of violence Black and POC characters are likely to come across. In the presence of Harry’s character (who is perfectly nice), we also see the complexity of distrust for white people, particularly white men, as Harry must prove himself an friend over and over again as the group grows. This world also features indentured servitude, which essentially is slavery under a more palatable name. We can see in a lot of ways how the world has fallen to the worst of all people, trampling the poor beneath it. And, like any world with so many levels of in-built systemic racism, most of the people walking the barren highways and being killed are people of color.

In short, this story feels terrifyingly possible. It is the sort of thing we can expect to befall the United States if hate is allowed to continue its reign. If things do not change both in the hearts and laws of this country, this is the fallout we can expect. It’s terrible and I hate it but this book is really fantastic so read it and be angry at the possibility with me.

Storytelling-wise, the book moves slowly. It is a journey book, with most of it spent on the road. Although leisurely, the pacing is good and Butler breaks up sequences with outbursts of fire and violence, as one would expect in a world such as this. It is not a “nice book”. Not a flowery dystopia with heroes and hope. Be ready for that, going in. Be ready for a thoughtful novel, filled with warnings. Most the story is spent world building and laying the foundation for Earthseed, Lauren’s religion. It’s not preachy, not really, but compelling in its thoughtfulness. Parable of the Sower is a good book to read slowly, both to savor and best understand.

I honestly recommend this book, but it is not your-popular-mainstream-dystopia. This is definitely an adult dystopia. There are upsetting scenes rife with gore and violence. There is death. There is also a good amount of sexual content, though not shared in great detail. Parable of the Sower will appeal to fans of classic dystopias like 1984, and Fahrenheit 451, but also to fans of Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake. It’s very good, very interesting, and worth adding to your TBR. ( )
  Morteana | Apr 15, 2021 |
A lot of the dystopian stories I have read feel ‘safe’ because what triggered them doesn’t seem like it’ll happen. Often because it involves some technology we don’t have. And, even though Butler doesn’t tell us the how or why the world has reached its current point, it feels like we could be there. That makes reading this so much more poignant and at times difficult to keep reading. Though, that is precisely the reason to read it.

Not everything that happens makes sense, but, not because of poor storytelling, but it feels like purposeful choice to make it feel real. ( )
  Sara_Cat | Mar 6, 2021 |
Just before I read Parable of the Sower, I read John Barne's more recent Daybreak Zero. In both books, American civilization is falling apart, as the technical infrastructure dies and mobs of crazy painted types attack and kills the small communities that remain. But the difference in the handling of this basic setup was night and day. Barnes' novel was a mix of adventure and horror. Butler's novel was one of challenge and growth. While chapters in both were painful to read at times, and there are no simple resolutions in either, with Butler there was an arc in the story I wanted to follow. The writings of Earthseed never convinced me, but I did believe in the young woman who created them.

Highly recommended, even if you're sick and tired of post-apocalyptic fiction. ( )
  ChrisRiesbeck | Feb 28, 2021 |
Set in the near future (Butler published the book in the 1990s, but it's set in the 2020s), Parable of the Sower is a dystopian science fiction novel about the societal collapse caused by climate change, peak oil, and corporate greed. Things are in a bad state already when the novel begins but conditions gradually deteriorate for the characters in the story much like they do for the mythical boiling frog. Butler also makes it clear that the dystopian state affects some people far earlier, much like they do in our real world, with the homeless and addicted gathered in the edges of the community.

The narrative begins in a walled community in Southern California. The novel is written as the journal of Lauren Oya Olamina, a teenage girl as the novel begins and the daughter of a minister. Lauren has a condition called empathy which causes her to feel the pleasure and pain of people near to her, a condition that can be crippling. She also develops a belief system called Earthseed based on the concept that God is change, and thinks that Earthseed could be a means to saving humanity.

As Lauren grows into young adulthood, she faces tragedies in both her family and greater community. But she also shows great resilience and leadership as she pulls together a group of allies (or as she would call them, the first Earthseed congregation). The novel is a grim depiction of a world that doesn't seem as far removed from our own reality of the 2020s as I would like. But it is also a novel that offers a lot of humanity and hope.

Favorite Passages:
“No. No, Donner’s just a kind of human banister.” “A what?” “I mean he’s like … like a symbol of the past for us to hold on to as we’re pushed into the future. He’s nothing. No substance. But having him there, the latest in a two-and-a-half-century-long line of American Presidents make people feel that the country, the culture that they grew up with is still here—that we’ll get through these bad times and back to normal.”

"That's all anybody can do right now. Live. Hold out. Survive. I don't know whether good times are coming back again. But I know that won't matter if we don't survive these times."

Freedom is dangerous but it's precious, too. You can't just throw it away or let it slip away. You can't sell it for bread and pottage. ( )
  Othemts | Feb 25, 2021 |
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» Adicionar outros autores (13 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Butler, Octavia E.autor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Bracharz, KurtÜbersetzerautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Gyan, DeborahArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Palencar, John JudeArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Puckey, DonDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Rouard, PhilippeTraductionautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Thigpen, LynneNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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Prodigy is, at its essence, adaptability and persistent, positive obsession. Without persistence, what remains is an enthusiasm of the moment. Without adaptability, what remains may be channeled into destructive fanaticism. Without positive obsession, there is nothing at all. -- EARTHSEED: THE BOOKS OF THE LIVING by Lauren Oya Olamina
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"Parable of the Sower is the Butlerian odyssey of one woman who is twice as feeling in a world that has become doubly dehumanized. The time is 2025. The place is California, where small walled communities must protect themselves from hordes of desperate scavengers and roaming bands of people addicted to a drug that activates an orgasmic desire to burn, rape, and murder. When one small community is overrun, Lauren Olamina, an 18 year old black woman with the hereditary train of "hyperempathy"--which causes her to feel others' pain as her own--sets off on foot along the dangerous coastal highways, moving north into the unknown"--

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2 edições deste livro foram publicadas por Hachette Book Group.

Edições: 0446601977, 0446675504

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