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Mrs. Osmond: A novel de John Banville
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Mrs. Osmond: A novel (original: 2017; edição: 2017)

de John Banville (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
2521280,450 (3.68)18
"From the Man Booker Prize-winning author of The Sea and The Blue Guitar--a dazzling new novel that extends the story of Isabel Archer, the heroine of Henry James's The Portrait of a Lady, into unexpected (and completely stand-alone) territory. Isabel Archer is a young American woman, swept off to Europe in the late nineteenth century by an aunt who hopes to round out the impetuous but naive girl's experience of the world. When Isabel comes into a large, unexpected inheritance, she is finagled into a marriage with the charming, penniless, and--as Isabel finds out too late--cruel and deceitful Gilbert Osmond, whose connection to a certain Madame Merle is suspiciously intimate. On a trip to England to visit her cousin Ralph Touchett on his deathbed, Isabel is offered a chance to free herself from the marriage, but nonetheless chooses to return to Italy. Banville follows James's story line to this point, but Mrs. Osmond is thoroughly Banville's own: the narrative inventiveness; the lyrical precision and surprise of his language; the layers of emotional and psychological intensity; the subtle, dark humor. And when Isabel arrives in Italy--along with someone else!--the novel takes off in directions that James himself would be thrilled to follow"--… (mais)
Membro:bookhookgeek
Título:Mrs. Osmond: A novel
Autores:John Banville (Autor)
Informação:Knopf (2017), Edition: First Edition, 384 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:***
Etiquetas:historical-fiction, victorian

Detalhes da Obra

Mrs. Osmond de John Banville (2017)

Adicionado recentemente porWXC89, WXC789, wxc777, WXC77, WXC88, cnfoht
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He had paused on a pathway, under a trellis of vines, and was patting his pockets and frowning—he must have forgotten something at his neighbour's apartment, his cigar case, most probably, since it was a thing he frequently mislaid and left behind. He wore a pale loose linen suit and a cambric shirt with a soft collar; his waistcoat was unbuttoned and his straw hat was pushed far back at an uncharacteristically casual and what for anyone else would have been a comical angle, although it nevertheless gave to him, with his narrow face and tapering beard, the look of one of El Greco's haloed, white-clad saints. Although they were separated only by some yards, he would not yet have seen her, so bright was the sunlight surrounding him and so dimly shadowed the doorway within which she stood. She made no sound or movement, only stayed still and watched him. He was usually so sharply self-aware a man that, caught there in the glare of noonday and not knowing he was observed, he appeared to Isabel unwontedly a figure of the ordinary sort, distracted, agitated, vexed both at his own forgetfulness and the stubborn way that supposedly inanimate, taken-for-granted things have of making themselves furiously elusive. (p.275)
Ah... Henry James. You either love the style of this great American novelist—designed to catch, with immense, with fiendish, subtlety, and in sentences of labyrinthine intricacy, the very texture of conscious life—or you hate it. There are 208 words in that excerpt, and we agree, I am sure, that nothing has happened, and this paragraph goes on for a page and half, and still nothing happens. What is truly remarkable about John Banville's 'sequel' to James' The Portrait of a Lady (1881) is that his style in Mrs Osmond so faithfully replicates James's style and yet remains so readable.
It's playful too. Isabel Archer is one of the great disappointments in 19th century fiction: her assertive independence fizzles out in Europe when she learns of her husband Gilbert Osmond's perfidy and it's not clear whether she goes back to him or not. Oh please! we thought, when we read Portrait of a Lady in our younger years, bring on the feminist literature project and let us have female protagonists with some intelligence and gumption. Banville plays with us all through Mrs Osmond... what is this rich (enormously rich) young woman going to do to salvage her life?

To read the rest of my review please visit https://anzlitlovers.com/2020/06/15/mrs-osmond-by-john-banville/ ( )
  anzlitlovers | Jun 14, 2020 |
Banville dips into the Victorian-era with this novel and uses an unusual (American) lead female character. Loads of interior monologue, long-winded sentences that I had to read and re-read. That sounds harsh, but it's more of a comment on my reading ability. His writing is for the reader that enjoys reading and an author that knows how to turn a good phrase. Do not expect a gripping and flowing adventure- although there is one hiding in here. It is not a book for everyone, but I sincerely enjoyed this novel. ( )
  reyrey | May 4, 2020 |
John Banville's latest book continues the story of Isabel Archer, the protagonist in Henry James's book, The Portrait of a Lady. I had mixed feelings about the book, overall. It was fun to revisit the characters, but I didn't really connect to the characters in the same way as I did in the original. I think some of this had to do with the language/writing style. Banville tries to recreate James's wordy, clause-filled style and though its recognizable it just can't be the same. Also, a lot of the book seemed like a regurgitation of what happened in James's work, probably to remind the reader what had happened.

I've seen several people say they didn't like the ending, but I actually did like that part. As in the original it ends on a sort of disappointing and ambiguous note and that worked for me.

I'm glad I read this, but it wasn't quite as successful as I wanted it to be. It has led me to pick up What Maisie Knew, the shortest James novel I have left to read. :-) ( )
  japaul22 | Jul 5, 2019 |
A tour de force mimicking Henry James's style and following up his Portrait of a Lady. Given the plausible thesis that Isobel would one day rebel against her marriage, it's carried off very believably. In the unlikely event that Henry James would have referred to lesbianism, it would surely have been by arch references to Sappho and convents. But only uneducated people should spell "have" as "of", even if it's an imitation of the Cockney pronunciation.
  jgoodwll | Dec 12, 2018 |
I read this innocent of it being a pastiche of Henry James and thought yurgh this is like Henry James and took it back to the library unfinished. ( )
  adrianburke | Nov 8, 2018 |
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The last page of Henry James’s Portrait of a Lady (1881) leaves its heroine, Isabel Osmond, with an ambiguous choice. To go back into the cage of her wretched marriage might be an exercise of will for duty’s sake, or an evasion, based on fear. Readers have been disputing Isabel’s motives ever since her creator so provokingly left the door ajar. Now, distinguished Irish novelist John Banville has taken it on himself to answer the question that James left hanging. What will Isabel do next, and why?
adicionado por rodneyvc | editarAustralian Book Review, Brenda Niall (Web site pago) (Feb 1, 2018)
 

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Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
John Banvilleautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Castanyo, EduardTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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"From the Man Booker Prize-winning author of The Sea and The Blue Guitar--a dazzling new novel that extends the story of Isabel Archer, the heroine of Henry James's The Portrait of a Lady, into unexpected (and completely stand-alone) territory. Isabel Archer is a young American woman, swept off to Europe in the late nineteenth century by an aunt who hopes to round out the impetuous but naive girl's experience of the world. When Isabel comes into a large, unexpected inheritance, she is finagled into a marriage with the charming, penniless, and--as Isabel finds out too late--cruel and deceitful Gilbert Osmond, whose connection to a certain Madame Merle is suspiciously intimate. On a trip to England to visit her cousin Ralph Touchett on his deathbed, Isabel is offered a chance to free herself from the marriage, but nonetheless chooses to return to Italy. Banville follows James's story line to this point, but Mrs. Osmond is thoroughly Banville's own: the narrative inventiveness; the lyrical precision and surprise of his language; the layers of emotional and psychological intensity; the subtle, dark humor. And when Isabel arrives in Italy--along with someone else!--the novel takes off in directions that James himself would be thrilled to follow"--

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