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The Taking of K-129: How the CIA Used Howard…
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The Taking of K-129: How the CIA Used Howard Hughes to Steal a Russian Sub… (original: 2017; edição: 2017)

de Josh Dean (Autor)

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1043202,001 (4.13)1
A true story of Cold War espionage and engineering reveals how the CIA and the U.S. Navy, using the involvement of Howard Hughes as a cover story, spent six years and nearly a billion dollars to steal a nuclear-armed Soviet submarine after it sank in the Pacific Ocean. "In the early hours of February 25, 1968, Russian nuclear-armed submarine K-129 left Siberia on a routine combat patrol to Hawaii. Then it vanished. As the Soviet Navy searched in vain for the lost vessel, a small, highly classified American operation found it--wrecked at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean. The sub lay three miles down, but the potential intelligence assets on board--the nuclear warheads, battle orders, and cryptological machines--presented an extraordinary opportunity. So began Project Azorian, a top secret mission that took six years, cost an estimated $800 million, and would become the largest and most daring covert operation in history. After the US Navy declared retrieving the sub "impossible," the mission fell to the CIA's burgeoning Directorate of Science and Technology, which commissioned the most expensive ship ever built [the Hughes Glomar Explorer] and told the world that it belonged to the reclusive billionaire Howard Hughes, who would use the mammoth vessel to mine rare minerals from the ocean floor. In reality, a vast network of spies, scientists, and engineers attempted a project even crazier than Hughes's reputation: raising the sub directly under the watchful eyes of the Russians, at a time when nuclear annihilation was a constant fear and the opportunity to gain even the slightest advantage over one's enemy was worth massive risk."--Jacket.… (mais)
Membro:amazetome
Título:The Taking of K-129: How the CIA Used Howard Hughes to Steal a Russian Sub in the Most Daring Covert Operation in History
Autores:Josh Dean (Autor)
Informação:Dutton (2017), 448 pages
Coleções:Kindle
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:nonfiction

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The Taking of K-129: How the CIA Used Howard Hughes to Steal a Russian Sub in the Most Daring Covert Operation in History de Josh Dean (2017)

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Exibindo 3 de 3
Just seems like a good story. ( )
  MarianneAudio | Aug 14, 2020 |
Nonfiction with scientific & engineering detail of a behemoth of a ship built to pick up a Soviet nuclear submarine 3 miles under the ocean a snooze fest, especially when you meet just about everyone who had anything to do with it? No, it was almost 5 stars. Not knowing its history, the book was suspenseful and spellbounding. To the extent he could learn it, the author gave the Soviet side of the story, too. I learned about spy craft from both sides of the Pacific and how the CIA keeps secrets. It kept this massive project under wraps for almost 6 years! It was fascinating how the USA and USSR dealt with the situation after the project was discovered, especially given the still freezing Cold War and the Vietnam War. One complaint: The subtitle is not accurate and somewhat misleading. But I think that’s what makes the book marketable. Did the USA get the sub? My lips are sealed! That would spoil it! ( )
  KarenMonsen | Apr 17, 2020 |
Josh Dean skillfully navigates the intricate, clandestine path taken by the United States at the height of the cold war to recover the sunken Soviet submarine, K-129. On or about March 11, 1968, K-129 suffered an undisclosed failure in the north Pacific and sank. The Soviet Navy responded with a massive, all-hands-on-deck search and rescue mission but to no avail. Aware of the nature of the Soviet’s activity at sea, the CIA decided to search for and recover the lost sub for any information it might contain.
After having located the U.S.S Thresher and U.S.S. Scorpion, both lost in deep water, the CIA received permission from Howard Hughes to use his name and corporation as cover. Under the pretense of “a deep ocean mining venture,” the “Hughes Corporation” (CIA) built the Glomar Explorer specifically to recover K-129 from 16,500 feet of water. In August of 1974, while ostensibly mining the ocean floor for manganese, a Soviet seagoing tug approached. Harassing Glomar Explorer and taking pictures of the strange ship, the Soviets remained unaware that K-129 was hanging from the capture vehicle beneath the ship. The cover and operation were a qualified success.
Mr. Dean weaves a dizzying cast of characters into a readable narrative that is fascinating in its scope and for its cover story holding for five years. Only when the first phase was complete did a major-media leak scuttle any further attempts. Nicely done Mr. Dean. One complaint, however: The accompanying photos were too few to enlighten, and did neither the Glomar Explorer nor K-129 justice. I had to beseech the Oracle of Google for that. Seriously, seeing K-129 lying on the ocean floor some three miles down gave one pause as to the absurd difficulty of raising a sub from that depth and keeping it secret. The picture of John Wayne posing as a potential customer on the stern of the Glomar Explorer, not so much. Three and a half stars. Well done. ( )
  Renzomalo | May 13, 2018 |
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A true story of Cold War espionage and engineering reveals how the CIA and the U.S. Navy, using the involvement of Howard Hughes as a cover story, spent six years and nearly a billion dollars to steal a nuclear-armed Soviet submarine after it sank in the Pacific Ocean. "In the early hours of February 25, 1968, Russian nuclear-armed submarine K-129 left Siberia on a routine combat patrol to Hawaii. Then it vanished. As the Soviet Navy searched in vain for the lost vessel, a small, highly classified American operation found it--wrecked at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean. The sub lay three miles down, but the potential intelligence assets on board--the nuclear warheads, battle orders, and cryptological machines--presented an extraordinary opportunity. So began Project Azorian, a top secret mission that took six years, cost an estimated $800 million, and would become the largest and most daring covert operation in history. After the US Navy declared retrieving the sub "impossible," the mission fell to the CIA's burgeoning Directorate of Science and Technology, which commissioned the most expensive ship ever built [the Hughes Glomar Explorer] and told the world that it belonged to the reclusive billionaire Howard Hughes, who would use the mammoth vessel to mine rare minerals from the ocean floor. In reality, a vast network of spies, scientists, and engineers attempted a project even crazier than Hughes's reputation: raising the sub directly under the watchful eyes of the Russians, at a time when nuclear annihilation was a constant fear and the opportunity to gain even the slightest advantage over one's enemy was worth massive risk."--Jacket.

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