Página inicialGruposDiscussãoExplorarZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Martin Luther: The Man Who Rediscovered God…
Carregando...

Martin Luther: The Man Who Rediscovered God and Changed the World (edição: 2017)

de Eric Metaxas (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaConversas
6191329,540 (4.12)Nenhum(a)
NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER "Metaxas is a scrupulous chronicler and has an eye for a good story. . . . full, instructive, and pacey." --The Washington Post From #1 New York Times bestselling author Eric Metaxas comes a brilliant and inspiring biography of the most influential man in modern history, Martin Luther, in time for the 500th anniversary of the Reformation On All Hallow's Eve in 1517, a young monk named Martin Luther posted a document he hoped would spark an academic debate, but that instead ignited a conflagration that would forever destroy the world he knew. Five hundred years after Luther's now famous Ninety-five Theses appeared, Eric Metaxas, acclaimed biographer of the bestselling Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy and Amazing Grace: William Wilberforce and the Heroic Campaign to End Slavery, paints a startling portrait of the wild figure whose adamantine faith cracked the edifice of Western Christendom and dragged medieval Europe into the future. Written in riveting prose and impeccably researched, Martin Luther tells the searing tale of a humble man who, by bringing ugly truths to the highest seats of power, caused the explosion whose sound is still ringing in our ears. Luther's monumental faith and courage gave birth to the ideals of liberty, equality, and individualism that today lie at the heart of all modern life.… (mais)
Membro:sarahjhackman
Título:Martin Luther: The Man Who Rediscovered God and Changed the World
Autores:Eric Metaxas (Autor)
Informação:Viking (2017), Edition: 1st Edition, 496 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Work Information

Martin Luther: The Man Who Rediscovered God and Changed the World de Eric Metaxas

Nenhum(a)
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

Mostrando 1-5 de 12 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
This book struggles. It leaves out a couple of children and, in the end, seems to jump back and forth in the timeline a bit. However, it is one of the most thoughtful and researched bios I've read on Luther (Not that I'm super well-versed in Lutherism. It's only the 3rd one, to be exact). And it does a good job of painting a picture of the times, including the relevant names of the day: Tyndale, Henry VIII, Erasmus (whom I love), More, Cromwell.

It definitely presents the subject in all of his sheer effrontery and lack of tact. I don't think I would have liked him as a person. Probably wouldn't have liked him as a neighbor. In fact, his resemblance to a certain head of state is not comforting. But, given the fact that he didn't marry 3 times, wasn't racist... hang on.... :) Yet I still admire the man and the effrontery.

It was a very uncomfortable portrait that exposed a lot of my preconceived notions and biases. Does it change my political stance? No. But, Luther, like me, had his notions and biases and I'm just gonna have to live with those, cause what I know of him isn't going to change for a while. ( )
  OutOfTheBestBooks | Sep 24, 2021 |
My fascination with Martin Luther extends back to my days in seminary in Dr. John Riggs’ Church History class. It was 2003, the year that Eric Till’s “Luther,” starring Joseph Fiennes had first hit theaters, just about the time that we began to cover the Reformation Era. In class one day, one student asked Dr. Riggs if he planned to go watch the new movie. He vehemently swore he would not nor would he EVER see any movie about Luther’s life unless they allowed actor John Goodman to play the role! By all the accounts we have of Luther’s appearance and personality, Riggs pointed out, he was a large man (nearly 300 pounds), blond-haired and blue-eyed, with a big voice and a razor-sharp wit. He felt that Fiennes’ Luther represented just another unfortunate “Hollywoodization” of historical fact. Later on in the course, we were assigned to read a (hilarious) sampling of Luther’s sermons, and I could not help but hear them in Goodman’s deep, gravelly voice.

It is no secret, as Dr. Riggs emphasized, that Luther is one historical figure that truly defines the phrase “larger-than-life.” The enormity of his influence, not just on Christian theology but on the whole of Western society, is still felt and has yet to be fully articulated. Coupled with the rise of the Renaissance, Luther’s Reformation stands as the historical birth of the “modern world.”

Given this long-standing fascination, it may come as a surprise that Metaxas’ quincentennial biography of Martin Luther is the first I have read in full, but I would say one would be hard-pressed to find a better contemporary introduction to this startling figure. Metaxas is a simply superb storyteller who has a real gift for compressing a lengthy and convoluted history into a readable narrative. All the key figures make their appropriate appearances but I never felt like I was swimming in a “sea of names and dates,” as can happen so often with biographies of important personages. He achieves a kind of economy here that serves beginner readers well.

Having said that, I don’t know that I would go so far as to say that Metaxas’ work will join the ranks of classic Luther biographies (e.g., Roland Bainton’s “Here I Stand”). It never feels like Metaxas really has all that much new to say about Luther or that he is addressing any of the crucial debates surrounding Luther in any sort of sustained manner. He is definitely writing in the spirit of a “summary overview.” (Perhaps here Metaxas’ training and experience as a journalist has overtaken his theological sensibilities.)

This may be most evident in Metaxas’ dealing with Luther’s egregiously anti-Semitic “On the Jews & Their Lies” (1543). The treatment here is decidedly (annoyingly) brief, presenting it as the single sour footnote to an otherwise glorious life. Perhaps that is true, but it still sounds a touch dismissive, especially given the wicked use to which those words were put by 20th-century Nazi ideology. Granted, explaining the roots and effects of that work are probably worthy of a book or two in their own right, so Metaxas may have been right to gloss the issue.

One of the things that I found most helpful in Metaxas’ work is how he grounds his reading of Luther’s life in his experiences (in early and later life) of Anfechtungen, those experiences of deep existential despair. Andrew Pettegree calls it simply “depression,” and though that may the closest contemporary equivalent, Metaxas demonstrates that it is a very inadequate understanding. For Luther, these bouts of melancholy were direct attacks of demonic forces, even of Satan himself (Metaxas goes to great lengths to show the seriousness with which Luther took the idea of “spiritual warfare”).

This strikes me as the right interpretive move because it is only when one understands the depths of Luther’s despair/guilt/shame that one can truly understand the release he found in the discovery of justification by faith alone. And it also goes some way to explain the ever-growing harshness of his attacks against the Roman Catholic Church and those wings of the Reformation that seemed to him to smack of a return to salvation-by-works.

As the subtitle of the book indicates, Metaxas here is after much more than a biography of a great theologian; he wants to present Luther as the “catalyst” of Modernity, the one who introduced such taken-for-granted ideas as the priority of conscience, the value of reasoned argument as the only reliable path to truth, and the value of pluralistic society. What Luther unleashed was so much more than just a correction of a corrupted Church…it was a veritable Copernican revolution of our worldview. For good AND ill, the work of Martin Luther transformed the Western worldview.

I suppose this may strike some of the more devout readers as a kind of “secular” reading of Luther, but it is difficult to argue with the case Metaxas makes for these claims. It seems that perhaps there might be a subtle subtext here of a case for the role of private faith in the public domain. Or, at least, an irrefutable illustration of how such “private” concerns as religious beliefs cannot help but impact an individual’s “public” roles.

Being more dilettante than connoisseur in Luther studies, I would dare not give the final word on the value of Metaxas’ contribution compared to other past giants in the field. I would only say that Metaxas has provided a work that has ENCOURAGED my fascination with Martin Luther, inspiring me to read further. Perhaps, in the end, that is the best recommendation any biography could receive. ( )
  Jared_Runck | Oct 3, 2020 |
I love biographies, and as biographies go, this one is a home run. Metaxas did thorough research and the detail and information about Luther, his friends, his enemies and his wife are all full of interesting tidbits. He takes you back into history and explains many things about daily life, illness, government and religion as they apply to Luther. Extremely well done and highly recommended. ( )
  JohnKaess | Jul 23, 2020 |
Luther was indisputably one of the heavy-hitters of history. He blew apart Western Christendom with the printing press, the right man at the right time, and in some aspects a "great bad man" à la Cromwell. A good, solid, and very engaging biography.
  kencf0618 | Jul 2, 2020 |
I enjoyed the way this read and was able to get swept up into the narrative fairly easily. I also enjoyed the wide vocabulary and learned two new words – “marmoreal” and “macaronic.” This was also the first time I’ve seen the word “yclept” used in a modern work: “he himself [Wycliff] translated most of the New Testament into English – although of course in the fourteenth century it was not the so-yclept Modern English of our own time but the Middle English of Chaucer.” (Page 20). And there’s nothing like using the Middle English “yclept” in a sentence referring to Middle English!

Something I found troubling was that the descriptions of Catholic belief on a variety of issues seemed somewhat simplistic and at some places just odd – not to mention that “Salve Regina” translates to “Hail, Queen” not “Save, Queen.” Because knowing the Catholic stance is extremely important to any study of the Reformation, I think it’s important to be as clear as possible.

Not only that, but the book seemed like an odd mixture of biography, hagiography, devotional exercise, sermon, and history and I couldn’t really get past it. There were multiple times where I would read some statement about Luther and be like, “What? That doesn’t sound right” or “I’m not so sure. What about…?” Usually I don’t have that strong of a reaction to the information in the types of biographies I tend to read, and I’m not sure why this time was so different. Perhaps I just needed some more detail in the notes, or it could be that I’m simply accustomed to much more academic biographies. Maybe that’s why I found it so strange that the acknowledgements section did not include the names of any libraries in which sources were researched, or mention the names of any research librarians, archivists, curators, or other scholars in the same area.

Favorite quotes:

“With a flourish of Simon Peter’s sacred pen, the bastardi were parthenogenetically reconceived into the fold of respectable citizens and more than that, into that particularly exclusive club constituted of legitimate children of the popes.” (Page 23).

“What he [Tetzel] was selling now made snake oil cure-all potions seem like fresh fruits and vegetables.” (Page 101).

“Only six decades after the invention of moveable type, Luther and Eck treated the world to its first typographic battle, waged with pre-Zapf dingbats.” (Page 130). These two must have had an interesting sense of humor. Eck wrote a book to rebut the 95 theses, which he titled Obelisks.” Obelisks (or “daggers”) were placed in manuscripts to indicate that their associated text might be of spurious origin. Luther wrote a response and called it Asterisks. Asterisks were used to mark particularly valuable texts.

“Henry’s well-known decapitation of two of his wives makes Luther’s statement plausible enough, but the story of Luther’s back-and-forth with the ginger multi-wived tyrant began almost a decade earlier…” (Page 379). I have the feeling this phrase could be used to describe other leaders as well. ( )
  Jennifer708 | Mar 21, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 12 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
This book is dedicated to my friends Markus Spieker and Dr. Gregory Alan Thornbury
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Introduction: In 1934 an African American pastor from Georgia made the trip of a lifetime, sailing across the Atlantic Ocean, through the gates of Gibraltor, and across the Mediterranean Sea to the Holy Land.
There is no beginning to the story of Martin Luther.
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico
Canonical LCC

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER "Metaxas is a scrupulous chronicler and has an eye for a good story. . . . full, instructive, and pacey." --The Washington Post From #1 New York Times bestselling author Eric Metaxas comes a brilliant and inspiring biography of the most influential man in modern history, Martin Luther, in time for the 500th anniversary of the Reformation On All Hallow's Eve in 1517, a young monk named Martin Luther posted a document he hoped would spark an academic debate, but that instead ignited a conflagration that would forever destroy the world he knew. Five hundred years after Luther's now famous Ninety-five Theses appeared, Eric Metaxas, acclaimed biographer of the bestselling Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy and Amazing Grace: William Wilberforce and the Heroic Campaign to End Slavery, paints a startling portrait of the wild figure whose adamantine faith cracked the edifice of Western Christendom and dragged medieval Europe into the future. Written in riveting prose and impeccably researched, Martin Luther tells the searing tale of a humble man who, by bringing ugly truths to the highest seats of power, caused the explosion whose sound is still ringing in our ears. Luther's monumental faith and courage gave birth to the ideals of liberty, equality, and individualism that today lie at the heart of all modern life.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Capas populares

Links rápidos

Avaliação

Média: (4.12)
0.5
1
1.5
2 4
2.5 1
3 6
3.5
4 15
4.5 5
5 19

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 164,633,547 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível