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The Marrow Thieves de Cherie Dimaline
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The Marrow Thieves (original: 2017; edição: 2017)

de Cherie Dimaline (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
5872630,323 (4.07)20
"In a future world ravaged by global warming, people have lost the ability to dream, and the dreamlessness has led to widespread madness. The only people still able to dream are North America's indigenous population - and it is their marrow that holds the cure for the rest of the world. But getting the marrow - and dreams - means death for the unwilling donors. Driven to flight, a 15-year-old and his companions struggle for survival, attempt to reunite with loved ones, and take refuge from the "recruiters" who seek them out to bring them to the marrow-stealing 'factories.'"--… (mais)
Membro:jorgexma
Título:The Marrow Thieves
Autores:Cherie Dimaline (Autor)
Informação:DCB (2017), 260 pages
Coleções:Lista de desejos
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:canlit, FN, fiction, dystopian

Detalhes da Obra

The Marrow Thieves de Cherie Dimaline (2017)

Adicionado recentemente pordchaves, biblioteca privada, lochinb, cathutt, MrsBoscaino, Jocelyn73c, boisjere, kwjr
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What happens when we stop dreaming? And what if we could steal the dreams of someone else and take them for our own? Would we do it, even if it meant the destruction of the people we’re stealing from? That question is at the heart of this Young Adult novel (which even adult readers will find compelling) by Cherie Dimaline. It centers the historical experience of indigenous nations in an imagined future where, sadly, not much has changed from the racist past and present.

In that not-so-distant future, rampant climate change has wreaked havoc on the Earth. Coastal regions of North America have fallen prey to the rising seas, and the seismic shifts have ruptured pipelines and sent pollution spilling across the landscape. The resulting hordes of refugees have strained resources in the habitable areas that remain and sparked wars and societal disruption.

All of the chaos has also caused a less obvious problem: People have lost the ability to dream, causing emotional and physical stress to build. It seems only one group has escaped the dreamless void: Indigenous people, perhaps because of their ancestral ties to and respect for the land, continue to experience normal dreaming. But what at first seems like a blessing quickly becomes a nightmare, as white scientists develop a way to extract dreams from indigenous individuals and implant them in the dreamless people. No one seems to care that the restoration of health to whites means the death of the expendable indigenous people.

Frenchie is a 15-year-old indigenous boy when [The Marrow Thieves] starts. He and his brother Mitch have lost both their parents and are on the run, in hiding from the Recruiters who round up indigenous people and take them to facilities modeled on the 19th century residential boarding schools where native children in both the US and Canada were sent to “cure” them of their native culture. The new versions dispense with the re-education and simply “harvest” dreams from their captives, consigning them to a death sentence. The two brothers are separated, and just when things look most dire for Frenchie he meets up with another group of indigenous people who are also fleeing the white Recruiters. Together this ragtag band of strangers makes its way north, where they hope to find safety in a place where few or no white people, the land is less polluted and they will be able to once again pass on their ancient cultural traditions to their children.

Dimaline doles out the backstory for Frenchie and his companions sparingly, alternating flashbacks into each one’s past life with the perilous day-to-day existence they are sharing in the present. The flashbacks aren’t intrusive and they bring the characters to life in a way that simply expositing their backgrounds would not. By the end, readers will celebrate and mourn alongside the characters we’ve come to know.

Really, the only flaw I could find won’t necessarily be a dealbreaker for everyone (or even anyone) else. Because this is a YA novel, narrated by a teenage (though appealing) character, there’s a bit too much self-absorption and time spent on a secondary romance that distracts from the tension of the main plot line. But even those elements are fairly muted compared to some YA I’ve read, and I have no reservations (no pun intended) about recommending this book to readers of all ages. It’s a wonderful book that shines a welcome spotlight on indigenous culture and people. ( )
  rosalita | Mar 8, 2021 |
This book is a slow burn of inconsistent pace but a persistent return to themes of loss and mourning. Dystopian on its face, the book is a much more complicated examination of family and loss in an age of crisis. The ending is perhaps too convenient, but I don't care. I still cried. It reminded me in many ways of Louise Erdrich's Future Home of the Living God, although with intentional focus on First Nations cultures and languages. ( )
  DrFuriosa | Dec 4, 2020 |
This is a really solid post-apocalyptic horror/thriller novel, featuring moments of honest terror as well as real emotion and warmth. Recommended. ( )
  RandyRasa | Oct 25, 2020 |
An astonishing book. Every bit as brutal as I'd expect from an indigenous-focussed post-apocalyptic story, and yet there's a surprising core of hopefulness in it. And all the way through it's thoroughly human, often quite tender, in ways that post-apocalyptic stories sometimes forget to be. ( )
  eldang | Oct 17, 2020 |
YA, dystopian, quite good. Near-future where most people have lost the ability to dream, leading to widespread (if thinly-sketched) societal breakdown. Indigenous peoples can still dream, and are being hunted. This book had some issues at plot-logistic levels, but was very enjoyable the closer it hewed to its YA protagonists; has some elements of both climate disaster and magic mixed in. Grimly plausible at some levels, and specifically called out the Canadian Indian residential school history. ( )
  jakecasella | Sep 21, 2020 |
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"The way to kill a man or nation is to cut off his dreams, the way the whites are taking care of the Indians: killing their dreams, their magic, their familiar spirits." - William S. Burroughs
"Where you've nothing else, construct ceremonies out of the air and breathe upon them." - Cormac McCarthy, The Road
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For the Grandmothers who gave me strength. To the children who give me hope.
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Mitch was smiling so big his back teeth shone in the soft light of the solar-powered lamp we'd scavenged from someone's shed.
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"In a future world ravaged by global warming, people have lost the ability to dream, and the dreamlessness has led to widespread madness. The only people still able to dream are North America's indigenous population - and it is their marrow that holds the cure for the rest of the world. But getting the marrow - and dreams - means death for the unwilling donors. Driven to flight, a 15-year-old and his companions struggle for survival, attempt to reunite with loved ones, and take refuge from the "recruiters" who seek them out to bring them to the marrow-stealing 'factories.'"--

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