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Nomadland de Jessica Bruder
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Nomadland (edição: 2018)

de Jessica Bruder (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
7183724,192 (4.08)53
Employers have discovered a new, low-cost labor pool, made up largely of transient older Americans. Finding that social security comes up short, often underwater on mortgages, these invisible casualties of the Great Recession have taken to the road by the tens of thousands in late-model RVs, travel trailers, and vans, forming a growing community of nomads: migrant laborers who call themselves "workampers." Bruder hits the road to get to know her subjects, accompanying them from job to job in the dark underbelly of the American economy, while celebrating their resilience and creativity.… (mais)
Membro:ToriaD
Título:Nomadland
Autores:Jessica Bruder (Autor)
Informação:Norton (2018), Edition: 1, 288 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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Nomadland de Jessica Bruder

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» Veja também 53 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 35 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
What happens when the decisions made leave you with little or no money to live in house, afford other necessities, or barely get by ? That is what is facing many Americans today. This is what Jessica Bruder looks at with this book. An underground, invisible band of people travelling the US getting by on seasonal work. ( )
  foof2you | Sep 27, 2021 |
So many things I didn't like about this book, yet so many ways I thought it was really good.

I think it tries to be 2 things at the same time...a description of a growing part of society that is facing serious financial problems, and also a description (advocate?) of a severely minimalist lifestyle. The first half especially I had so many problems with the characters and their really poor personal finance choices and the emphasis on how they are all "forced" to become van-dwellers. The second half, where Bruder embeds herself in the movement is much more focused on minimalist lifestyles and talk of how to do this lifestyle.

I get that there is huge income disparity in this nation, that I have the benefits of white privilege (wish there was more discussion of non-whites in the book, but at least she briefly addressed the issue), and that I'm male. BUT: I have no sympathy for someone who was making a 6 figure salary without ever apparently considering that retirement might cost them something, or for someone who bought a house much more expensive than they could afford, then complaining that it's the "others" who did this to them. All the characters have to come work for "the man" during part of the year to subsidize their bohemian lifestyle, which they hate, but they do it. And nobody ever seem to realize that putting your dreams on hold for a year or two in order to build financial equity might be a worthwhile tradeoff.

I liked the second part better, where Bruder describes some of the pros and cons of living the minimalist lifestyle. As someone who has given some thought to spending retirement going from campground to campground, I enjoyed her descriptions of the gatherings and was impressed by the community spirit she describes.

I haven't seen the movie and that doesn't appeal to me at this time.

( )
  Jeff.Rosendahl | Sep 21, 2021 |
I enjoyed the book. I was reluctant to start reading it because I feared it would be so depressing. It was NOT as depressing as I expected, and while I was full of admiration for the resourcefulness and strong spirit of the primary subject (Linda), I also felt a pit of dread in my stomach for her. I would like to know how her story turns out. ( )
  PNWGirl | Sep 21, 2021 |
audio nonfiction (10 hours)
nomad culture/houseless migrant workers who travel around fulfilling short-term jobs rather than being weighed down by mortgage and housing debts; "Earth ship" housing "trend"; inside look : being a camp host for California BLM (lots of unpaid overtime, try not to bother them at odd hours if you can help it); inside look: Amazon distribution center workers - pickers, stowers, seasonal shifts, working conditions

Really interesting, highly recommended. ( )
  reader1009 | Sep 7, 2021 |
I chose this as an audiobook as my sister recommended it and raved about it. I was not quite as enthralled. This latter-day "Grapes of Wrath" tome dwells on the plight primarily of the aging population struggling to get by, or I suppose one could use the word buy, as that is what we are all programmed to do.

So in seemingly endless narrative the author bemoans the "woe is me" plight of these poor folks as they drudge around the country in there dilapidated vans and RV's looking for scraps of drudge work, often provided by the commercial "Big Brother", Amazon. She befriends and comes back again and again to Linda who is like the poster woman for the down trodden and destitute retirement age persons scraping to get by.

Yes the stories and predicaments are heart rendering. Yet when you look at how our society is put together and the nature of capitalism in particular these not so fortunates that are growing in number, fueled primarily by the ageing Baby Boomers is inevitable. And the chilling message really is how far are you from this reality? Chilling indeed.

Aside from the pity and lamenting, no remedies or solutions are offered to the plight; just endless anguish. So the point of the book is to mainly illustrate how tough life can become for those not prepared, but probably even more so not through their own fault but the faults of your economic systems that shows little pity for the downtrodden. It makes one misty eyed for the days of yore and the golden, or at least brass, pensions that at one time existed for many.

Finally, a thought kept drifting through my mind as I listened to the tragic tales from this author who put the spotlight on their plight. Would she contribute to help these less fortunates through her book sale receipts? Or would she pocket them herself as she rides off into the sunset in her new Escalade. ( )
  knightlight777 | Aug 9, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 35 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Seventeen years into the 21st century, the news for the middle class is bleak. As one expert puts it in the book, the “three-legged stool” of retirement security — Social Security, private pensions and personal savings — has given way to “a pogo stick,” with Social Security as the single “wobbly” leg...When Bruder does stand aside, “Nomadland” soars. Her subjects are self-sufficient, proud people. Many in their 60s and beyond, they should be entering Shakespeare’s sixth age of man, “into the lean and slippered pantaloon/ With spectacles on nose and pouch/ On side.” Instead they are sans homes, sans money, sans security, sans everything, except their dignity and self-reliance.
adicionado por Lemeritus | editarWashington Post, Timothy R. Smith (Web site pago) (Oct 13, 2017)
 
If you’re in a city but you live in a van, or a trailer, or a tent, you are considered homeless. But if you’re in the desert or the forest, you’re camping. Rationalizations such as these are what make “Nomadland” such a compelling look at a weirdly camouflaged swath of society that’s more entwined around us than we realize....Change often began with a job layoff. Then they downsized, still fell behind and finally realized that their earlier lives cannot be reclaimed. Losers? Sure, some have made bad decisions. But most simply have lost, for reasons over which they had no control.... “What further contortions — or even mutations — of the social order will appear in years to come?” she asks. “How many people will get crushed by the system? How many will find a way to escape it?” This is important, eye-opening journalism, presented for us to contemplate: What if?
adicionado por Lemeritus | editarMinneapolis Star Tribune, Kim Ode (Sep 22, 2017)
 
“Nomadland,” by Jessica Bruder, an important if frustrating new work influenced by such classics of immersion journalism as Barbara Ehrenreich’s “Nickel and Dimed,” looks at one strategy older workers have devised for “surviving America.” ... “Nomadland” is part of a fleet of recent books about the gig economy. More than most, it’s able to comfortably contain various contradictions: “The nomads I’d been interviewing for months were neither powerless victims nor carefree adventurers,” Bruder writes.... Bruder is a poised and graceful writer. But her book is plagued by odd evasions. Take race, the major one.... there is no acknowledgment of the more than three million migrant workers in this country, who perhaps pick the same fruit and work the same backbreaking jobs as Bruder’s white would-be retirees.... These omissions don’t doom the book; but they do mark it.
adicionado por Lemeritus | editarNew York Times, Parul Sehgal (Web site pago) (Sep 19, 2017)
 
This powerhouse of a book grew out of Bruder’s article, “The End of Retirement,” published in Harper’s in 2014. She examines the phenomenon of a new tribe of down-and-outers—“workampers,” or “houseless” people—who travel the country in vans as they follow short-term jobs, such as harvesting sugar beets, cleaning campsites and toilets in wilderness parks, and stocking and plucking merchandise from bins at an Amazon warehouse, averaging 15 miles a shift walking the facility’s concrete floors. Bruder spent three years shadowing and interviewing members of this “new kind of wandering tribe.” In the best immersive-journalism tradition, Bruder records her misadventures driving and living in a van and working in a beet field and at Amazon....Visceral and haunting reporting.
adicionado por Lemeritus | editarBooklist, Connie Fletcher (Jul 1, 2017)
 
Journalist Bruder (Burning Book) expands on an article originally published in Harper’s where she examined the phenomenon of aging Americans adjusting to an economic climate in which they can’t afford to retire. Many among them have discarded “stick and brick” traditional homes for “wheel estate” in the form of converted vans and RVs and have formed a nomadic culture of “workampers,” evoking the desperate resourcefulness of those who lived through the Great Depression.... Tracing individuals throughout their journeys from coast to coast, Bruder conveys the phenomenon’s human element, making this sociological study intimate, personal, and entertaining, even as the author critiques the economic factors behind the trend.
adicionado por Lemeritus | editarPublisher's Weekly (May 29, 2017)
 

» Adicionar outros autores

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Bruder, Jessicaautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Peronny, NathalieTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
White, KarenNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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Some call them “homeless.” The new nomads reject that label. Equipped with both shelter and transportation, they’ve adopted a different word. They refer to themselves, quite simply, as “houseless.”
Being human means yearning for more than subsistence. As much as food or shelter, we require hope.
Driving on, they’re secure in this knowledge: The last free place in America is a parking spot.
...there are only a dozen counties and one metro area in America where a full-time minimum wage worker can afford a one-bedroom apartment at fair market rent. You’d have to make at least $16.35 an hour—more than twice the federal minimum wage—to rent such an apartment without spending more than the recommended 30 percent of income on housing.
Full-time travelers are a demographer’s nightmare. Statistically they blend in with the rest of the population, since the law requires them to maintain fixed—in other words, fake—addresses. No matter how widely they wander, nomads must be officially “domiciled” somewhere. Your state of residence is where you get vehicles registered and inspected, renew drivers’ licenses, pay taxes, vote, serve on juries, sign up for health insurance (except for those on Medicare), and fulfill a litany of other responsibilities.
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Employers have discovered a new, low-cost labor pool, made up largely of transient older Americans. Finding that social security comes up short, often underwater on mortgages, these invisible casualties of the Great Recession have taken to the road by the tens of thousands in late-model RVs, travel trailers, and vans, forming a growing community of nomads: migrant laborers who call themselves "workampers." Bruder hits the road to get to know her subjects, accompanying them from job to job in the dark underbelly of the American economy, while celebrating their resilience and creativity.

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