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Impossible Views of the World de Lucy Ives
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Impossible Views of the World (original: 2017; edição: 2017)

de Lucy Ives (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
959219,676 (2.71)2
"A witty, urbane, and sometimes shocking debut novel, set in a hallowed New York museum, in which a co-worker's disappearance and a mysterious map change a life forever Stella Krakus, a curator at Manhattan's renowned Central Museum of Art, is having the roughest week in approximately ever. Her soon-to-be ex-husband (the perfectly awful Whit Ghiscolmbe) is stalking her, a workplace romance with "a fascinating, hyper-rational narcissist" is in freefall, and a beloved colleague, Paul, has gone missing. Strange things are afoot: CeMArt's current exhibit is sponsored by a Belgian multinational that wants to take over the world's water supply, she unwittingly stars in a viral video that's making the rounds, and her mother--the imperious, impossibly glamorous Caro--wants to have lunch. It's almost more than she can overanalyze. But the appearance of a mysterious map, depicting a 19th-century utopian settlement, sends Stella--a dogged expert in American graphics and fluidomanie (don't ask)--on an all-consuming research mission. As she teases out the links between a haunting poem, several unusual novels, a counterfeiting scheme, and one of the museum's colorful early benefactors, she discovers the unbearable secret that Paul's been keeping, and charts a course out of the chaos of her own life. Pulsing with neurotic humor and dagger-sharp prose, Impossible Views of the World is a dazzling debut novel about how to make it through your early thirties with your brain and heart intact"--… (mais)
Membro:artandmusic
Título:Impossible Views of the World
Autores:Lucy Ives (Autor)
Informação:Penguin Press (2017), 304 pages
Coleções:Para ler
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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Impossible Views of the World de Lucy Ives (2017)

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Mostrando 1-5 de 9 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
ADVANCE GALLEY REVIEWS from Penguins First to Read
by Sandra Brower, Lincoln
Rated 3.5
This book took until page 80 for me to straighten out in my brain the writing style of Ms. Ives. Finally, I realized that I found the book oddly delightful in ways. Maybe, because as a fellow deep thinker, all over the place, go into my brain and see things happening in story form, like Stella's view of her own maddening stagnation when it came to one of her relationships (I mean, she uses a Star Wars reference for Pete's sake!!)

I just got the formation of her thoughts. Ms. Ives creates an impossible view of the inner workings of an inner NYC museum, that none of us might ever get a glimpse of seeing.

I did find it a little bit forced at the end. Through 304 pages of story it's only until towards the end we get even a hint of a resolution coming to the mysteryof Elysia.

I am a notetaker when it comes to reading as I review these books. There are a ton of art references in this book. If only for the fun of exploring a museum might you read Impossible Views of the World. If for pure reading, it might just be too Impossible to finish. Boy, did a re-learn a lot about Limner art! If nothing else.
Sorry, I gives this book a 2.5 rating. ( )
  SandraBrower | Oct 27, 2019 |
Stella, a mid-level employee at a New York City art museum, has hit some turbulence in her personal life. When her coworker dies, it sparks a wonderfully distracting scavenger hunt to figure out the origin of a secret map.

I enjoyed Lucy Ives' prose, and the mystery reminds me of The Crying of Lot 49 in its twists. Ultimately, I was left wanting more. Was Paul's death all that it seemed? How does WANSEE, the Nestle-like corporation funding the museum, fit into the story? Perhaps I wanted for things to be tied together neatly at the end, and I'm feeling sore that this is not to be. I will be thinking about it long after slipping it back into the returns box at the library. ( )
  maine_becca | Aug 23, 2019 |
Stella Krakus is having a rough week and is in the midst of an existential crisis (personal & professional). Her soon to be ex-husband, Whit, is being difficult, she's also at a confusing crossroads with her occasional hook up and colleague Fred. Her mother is adding to the pile by simply being herself and then there's the small matter of Paul, a colleague who was as much a work friend as Stella has, that's gone missing though no one at CeMArt seems much to care or at least, tepidly worry. There's also a foreboding looming encroachment of the corporatization & conglomeratization of the museum by WANSEE.

It is this mystery of what's happened to Paul (and then what he'd been doing before his end) that most pulled me through this story. I loved following Stella's trail of research (obscure books are connected to an obscure map and that map figures into a larger situation at the museum that has roots a good bit in the past and more obscure works). Add to that Stella's very clear voice, wry wit in the telling and tangential observations, I quite enjoyed this story. I found many passages that were highlight worthy and am a little sorry that I can't quote them here but it's worth mentioning just the same. The author definitely has a talent for lyrical prose and I appreciated that. The only thing I didn't find terribly compelling was Fred and I never quite understood Stella's fascination or attraction unless it was that he was purposely unattainable & emotionally unavailable to her, but it was good to see her get past him. I very much liked that without knowing it, Stella needed the journey of tracing Paul's trail to work out her own stuff and by the end she's in a better place than she began. Well done.

This read like a love letter to archivists and curators everywhere (cartographers, microcalligraphers, logophiles and those who love puzzles and puns, this is for you too). If that happens to be your thing (it's my thing) then go forth and enjoy. Also, I'd recommend this to literary fiction fans that also enjoy a bit of mystery.

I received a review copy of this book in exchange for my views. Thanks to the publisher & Netgalley. ( )
  anissaannalise | Feb 28, 2018 |
Impossible Views of the World by Lucy Ives was an impossibly frustrating reading experience. The language and narration of this book gets in the way of the story; it seem to be used not for the story but rather for the sake of language itself. The writing style and word choice gives the entire book a pretentious feel and leaves me as a reader disengaged from the story.

Read my complete review at http://www.memoriesfrombooks.com/2017/10/impossible-views-of-world.html

Reviewed for NetGalley ( )
1 vote njmom3 | Oct 19, 2017 |
WAY too much unneeded description of everything. I could only stand 15% before closing this book. I won't be going back to it. Reading a book should be entertaining, not agony.

I really wanted to like this book, but it was just impossible for me.

Thanks to Penguin Group and Net Galley for providing me with a free e-galley in exchange for an honest, unbiased review. ( )
1 vote | debkrenzer | Sep 21, 2017 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 9 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
It’s a smart novel brimming with ideas about love, art, personal agency, a lack thereof and, for the astute reader, a couple of minor characters sporting J. Crew.
adicionado por ablachly | editarNew York Times, Susan Coll (Aug 15, 2017)
 
Impossible Views of the World is an original debut ringing with smart prose, engaging humor and cultivated taste.
adicionado por ablachly | editarBookPage, Sarah Waller (Aug 1, 2017)
 
It’s a singular work, worthy of a place in any world-class collection.
adicionado por ablachly | editarVogue, Lauren Mechling (Jul 24, 2017)
 
A diversion and a pleasure, this novel leaves you feeling smarter and hipper than you were before.
adicionado por ablachly | editarKirkus Reviews (May 15, 2017)
 
Ives’s prose and storytelling feel deliberately obtuse at times, requiring readers to slow down to fully immerse themselves in the narrative’s nuances, but the result is an odd and thoroughly satisfying novel.
 
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"A witty, urbane, and sometimes shocking debut novel, set in a hallowed New York museum, in which a co-worker's disappearance and a mysterious map change a life forever Stella Krakus, a curator at Manhattan's renowned Central Museum of Art, is having the roughest week in approximately ever. Her soon-to-be ex-husband (the perfectly awful Whit Ghiscolmbe) is stalking her, a workplace romance with "a fascinating, hyper-rational narcissist" is in freefall, and a beloved colleague, Paul, has gone missing. Strange things are afoot: CeMArt's current exhibit is sponsored by a Belgian multinational that wants to take over the world's water supply, she unwittingly stars in a viral video that's making the rounds, and her mother--the imperious, impossibly glamorous Caro--wants to have lunch. It's almost more than she can overanalyze. But the appearance of a mysterious map, depicting a 19th-century utopian settlement, sends Stella--a dogged expert in American graphics and fluidomanie (don't ask)--on an all-consuming research mission. As she teases out the links between a haunting poem, several unusual novels, a counterfeiting scheme, and one of the museum's colorful early benefactors, she discovers the unbearable secret that Paul's been keeping, and charts a course out of the chaos of her own life. Pulsing with neurotic humor and dagger-sharp prose, Impossible Views of the World is a dazzling debut novel about how to make it through your early thirties with your brain and heart intact"--

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