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The black tides of Heaven de J. Y. Yang
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The black tides of Heaven (original: 2017; edição: 2017)

de J. Y. Yang

Séries: The Tensorate Series (book 1)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
6973924,163 (3.77)40
"Mokoya and Akeha, the twin children of the Protector, were sold to the Grand Monastery as infants. While Mokoya developed her strange prophetic gift, Akeha was always the one who could see the strings that moved adults to action. While Mokoya received visions of what would be, Akeha realized what could be. What's more, they saw the sickness at the heart of their mother's Protectorate. A rebellion is growing. The Machinists discover new levers to move the world every day, while the Tensors fight to put them down and preserve the power of the state. Unwilling to continue as a pawn in their mother's twisted schemes, Akeha leaves the Tensorate behind and falls in with the rebels. But every step Akeha takes towards the Machinists is a step away from Mokoya. Can Akeha find peace without shattering the bond they share with their twin?"--Publisher's description.… (mais)
Membro:eldang
Título:The black tides of Heaven
Autores:J. Y. Yang
Informação:New York, NY : Tom Doherty Associates, 2017.
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:*****
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Detalhes da Obra

The Black Tides of Heaven de JY Yang (Author) (2017)

Adicionado recentemente porMarmie7, Krinsekatze, ephemeralmochi, jiyoungh, biblioteca privada, katie.kloss, loganaube
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Mostrando 1-5 de 37 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
The worldbuilding had so much potential–children are non-binary theys until they decide a gender for themselves, the underclass use technology to rebel against the elemental magic of the elite–but it fell short. The plot’s broad strokes were compelling, but the dialogue and character motivations were undercooked. Chapters would begin 6, 10 years after the last, leaving too much to the imagination that could’ve (should’ve!) been rounded out with more worldbuilding detail. I was left wanting more. ( )
  jiyoungh | May 3, 2021 |
The worldbuilding in this book was amazing! I loved the magic system and the snippets of religion and I looked forward to picking it up every time. That being said, it felt like the character work was lacking. Although all the characters felt fascinating in their own right, the time-skips made it very difficult to get a proper feeling of progression. That being said, I'm still really looking forward to the next one! ( )
  Dreklogar | Jan 5, 2021 |
twins with very different fates ( )
  Saraishelafs | Nov 4, 2020 |
Pretty fun! A little thinly-sketched, but it is a novella. I'm left with lots of questions about how the world works. The magic system (and possible conflict/replacement with technology to make things more accessible) is interesting, as is the gender confirmation aspect of the society. The magical creatures felt like teasers, would like to see more. Will definitely continue reading the series. ( )
  jakecasella | Sep 21, 2020 |
2.5 stars. Sadly, I didn't love this one as much as I had expected. The beginning is very strong: lovely prose, evocative descriptions of an inventive fantasy landscape, twins who are very connected but also very different from each other: it had great potential.

Occasionally, the novella reclaims these early qualities for a beautiful sentence or two. But it felt as if it was only a novella because the author had been too lazy/uninterested in several important plot and character developments to actually write them out. A character is sent on a quest to retrieve phoenix feathers from a mountain top? Just summarize the trip in a sentence. A main character travels the realm, witnesses suffering, participates in a civil war, makes friends, watches those friends die? Only mentioned later in a summary, we never actually meet those friends nor witness his reaction. The interesting viewpoint character in the first chapter? Becomes irrelevant soon after. He's literally introduced with "[He] did not know it yet, but this night would change the course of all his days." Except it doesn't! He keeps his position, his job, everything continues exactly as before for him. His life doesn't change.

In addition, we start with the wonderful set-up of dual viewpoints, seeing things sometimes from one twin's perspective, sometimes from the other's. And then that just stops and we start getting only Akeha's perspective for the rest of the book, except for a few pages at the end. We later learn that the other twin was very busy during his absence and accomplished and grew a lot, but this is also only told in a summary, we don't get to experience any of the excitement.

So what are the pages spent on? Mostly: individual fights, most often against some monster that suddenly appears, and that has nothing to do with the story. Or a fight against a random drunk who also has nothing to do with the story. And teenage sexual angst, lust and self-doubt. Towards the end, we are *told* how much the twins supposedly always loved each other, and that love was the main characteristic of their relationship. But while they're actually still in the same town, we mostly see bickering arguments, jealousy, constantly comparing themselves to the other and feeling inferior or rejected, and even betraying the other by making out with their romantic partner. Uhm. Sorry, but that's pure ego drama, not sibling love in any way. And this episode is never alluded to again, never apologized for, nothing. By the way, all of the romance in this book is insta-love.

The world-building was wonderfully inventive, but also a total mess: none of it made sense in its wild mixture of historical detail, magic, and futuristic tech - none of it explained. The invented religion reminds me of the Force in Star Wars: The Slack is all, and all is the Slack. [...] All that is, exists through the grace of the Slack. All that moves, moves through the grace of the Slack. Except it doesn't, because again and again, the characters refer to "the fortunes" as moving everything, determining one's fate, granting favor or crushing you, and it's not explained why this doesn't contradict the "everything moves through the grace of the Slack" doctrine.

I guess my problem with this was mostly that the book's overall plot of a complicated civil war, technological progress in warfare, and rebellion against a tyrant, would have really benefited from a typical epic fantasy writing style. Descriptive, long, various POVs, fleshed-out, world explained, showing instead of telling. Instead, the author chose a very dreamy, fairy-tale like style that mostly tells instead of shows (except all those brief but irrelevant fight scenes of opponents unrelated to the plot), and leaves huge gaps of many years that aren't fleshed-out even though they contain absolutely crucial character development!

Maybe I shouldn't have read [b:The Empress of Salt and Fortune|51190882|The Empress of Salt and Fortune (The Singing Hills Cycle #1)|Nghi Vo|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1565188992l/51190882._SX50_SY75_.jpg|71836130] before this one because they're pretty similar: the story of a revolution is told, the style is lyrical, the world is very unique and Asian-inspired, and there's the same amount of LGBT/non-binary representation and use of singular "they". Except in Empress of Salt, everything made sense, and even the writing style worked because the story was told as a story-within-a-story by a character narrating it, trying to convey what really happened through subtle allusions. The character didn't want to spell everything out, she just alluded to things, implied things, and you got it. I think it was just handled much more elegantly there. There, the short novella format also made sense, I didn't expect nor want everything to be fleshed out and was happy to leave it as a somewhat vague fairy-tale - that was part of its beauty.

What I did like here: I did feel with the twins, I was emotionally attached to them, and I loved the beautiful Asian-inspired setting. It just didn't quite come together for me, it was a bit too unpolished, not fleshed-out enough. Yang clearly has a wonderful imagination and a lot of talent, so I'd be happy to try this author again at some point in the future. ( )
1 vote Evamaren | Sep 12, 2020 |
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Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Yang, JYAutorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Shimizu, YukoArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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To my queer family, who chill with me in the Slack
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Head Abbot Sung of the Grand Monastery did not know it yet, but this night would change the course of all his days.
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"Mokoya and Akeha, the twin children of the Protector, were sold to the Grand Monastery as infants. While Mokoya developed her strange prophetic gift, Akeha was always the one who could see the strings that moved adults to action. While Mokoya received visions of what would be, Akeha realized what could be. What's more, they saw the sickness at the heart of their mother's Protectorate. A rebellion is growing. The Machinists discover new levers to move the world every day, while the Tensors fight to put them down and preserve the power of the state. Unwilling to continue as a pawn in their mother's twisted schemes, Akeha leaves the Tensorate behind and falls in with the rebels. But every step Akeha takes towards the Machinists is a step away from Mokoya. Can Akeha find peace without shattering the bond they share with their twin?"--Publisher's description.

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