Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Carregando...

The Evangelicals: The Struggle to Shape America

de Frances FitzGerald

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
277572,345 (3.81)26
The evangelical movement began in the revivals of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, known in America as the Great Awakenings. A populist rebellion against the established churches, it became the dominant religious force in the country. During the nineteenth century, white evangelicals split apart dramatically, first North versus South, and then at the end of the century, modernist versus fundamentalist. After World War II, Billy Graham, the revivalist preacher, attracted enormous crowds and tried to gather all Protestants under his big tent, but the civil rights movement and the social revolution of the sixties drove them apart again. By the 1980s, Jerry Falwell, Pat Robertson, and other southern televangelists had formed the Christian right. Protesting abortion and gay rights, they led the South into the Republican Party, and for thirty-five years they were the sole voice of evangelicals to be heard nationally. Eventually a younger generation of leaders protested the Christian right's close ties with the Republican Party and proposed a broader agenda of issues, such as climate change, gender equality, and immigration reform. Evangelicals have in many ways defined the nation. They have shaped our culture and our politics. Evangelicals now constitute twenty-five percent of the American population, but they are no longer monolithic in their politics. They range from Tea Party supporters to social reformers. Still, with the decline of religious faith generally, FitzGerald suggests that evangelical churches must embrace ethnic minorities if they are to survive.… (mais)
Nenhum(a)
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 26 menções

Exibindo 5 de 5
A sweeping and comprehensive history of the evangelical movement from its earliest days to the brink of the 2016 presidential election. My interest in evangelism stems in part from living in upstate New York where the fiery evangelism of the Second Great Awakening flourished from the 1820's on. Charles Grandison Finney got his start in 1826 in the village of Westernville, NY that led to naming the region the "burned over district". Finney preached in our village church and even in our home as recounted in dramatic passages in his memoirs. The area was a hotbed of abolitionism, notable in one respect by the Oneida Institute, a religious training academy founded by Rev. George Gale, a pastor in our village church. (The institute is one of the first to offer training for black as well as white students.) Finney is identified as promoting the "new theology" that broke from traditional Calvinist doctrine to a pathway to salvation by individual choice of will.

Fitzgerald recounts the schism between the modernists and fundamentalists that erupted over the the challenges that Darwin's and others' science posed for the biblical view of origins. The modernists, to a great degree, moved away from biblical literalism as the complete explanation of origins. The fundamentalists held fast to the inerrancy of the bible as the only means to know history. While it seemed for a time that fundamentalism might fade, she points out that in many forms and through diverse acolytes it continued to be held widely across the nation, particularly, but not only, in the South. One aspect of evangelism that did change in the 20th century was the notion that evangelicals should maintain a separation from the secular world, that the realms of politics and culture were not within their purview. This began to be seen in the pronouncements of Billy Graham in his crusades and identification with presidents and other politicians. Engagement in politics grew substantially in the 80's and beyond by national religious organizations led by Jerry Falwell, Pat Robertson and James Dobson. Under the "pro-family" banner these leaders brought their followers deeply into political advocacy and became closely identified with the Republican party. Two issues drove these efforts and alliances: abortion and same-sex marriage/non-discrimination against homosexuals. (Fitzgerald terms these "below-the-belt issues). Courting leaders like Reagan, George H. W. Bush, Clinton and George W. Bush, the evangelicals were frustrated by the tepid results of their lobbying and political action. Despite their concerted efforts to inhibit access to abortions, Roe v Wade continues to buttress a woman's right to choose. The seismic shift in public acceptance toward sexual orientation and the rights of LGBTQ persons was seen by evangelical leaders as a devastating repudiation of their aims by the nation. What seems to have emerged as a reaction from these set backs is a sense of martyrdom and victimization of Christians on the religious right. There is also a strong connection of the most fervent of the evangelicals and right-wing movements like the Tea Party.

Emerging near the end of Bush's second term is a new school of evangelicals who connect their scriptural exegesis with other concerns such as poverty, disease and climate change. One leader said that evangelicals must let the world know what they are for, not just what they are against. ( )
  stevesmits | Mar 7, 2021 |
Read in summer of 2017. Pleased with first part dealing with spiritual awakening and influence on social issues. Fitzgerald gets sidetracked by associating the politics of the Christian right with evangelicals overall. Often allows personal liberal thoughts to make judgment statements. Has several obvious "historical" facts wrong. Don't think it is of award winning quality.
  pwaldrep | Apr 2, 2019 |
Fairly dry history of evangelical religion. Unfortunately, the most interesting parts of the book were the parts that I already knew well. ( )
  GaylaBassham | May 27, 2018 |
FitzGerald furnishes a dense, well-documented narrative that gave me insight into and a surprising amount of context for my own family history, as well as a better grasp of the forces at work in the current right-versus-left political and cultural wars in the U.S.

It's a pretty hefty volume, and not light reading. Its tone is scholarly but not overly academic. The way that it put things I thought I knew into a wider context and gave them new meaning kept me going.

The background and growth of the various evangelical movements, their impact on the past century and a half of social and political history in the U.S., and in particular the role of high-profile evangelists and religious leaders made for fascinating reading. I wish I'd known more about these things decades ago. It might not have changed what I did, but it would have given me a better understanding of the context in which I grew up and perhaps a bit more charity toward some of the key players.

One of many arresting and paradigm-jostling passages reminds us that Christianity represents a "spiritual aristocracy" and that is is emphatically not democratic. With God on your side, you have no need of majoritarian politics. Those who can embrace the idea that God's use of flawed instruments and outnumbered troops redounds to his greater glory see victory differently from the rest of us. ( )
2 vote Meredy | Dec 28, 2017 |
A history of the Evangelical movement perhaps better subtitled, "The Story of Why Evangelicals Vote the Way They Do," aka the only reason secularists tend to care about Evangelical Christianity.

The author is well researched and does about as well as a person can in attempting to maintain a secular disinterest but communicate about the subject. She spends very little time in the early period of the movement, focusing mostly on the divides manifest in the great awakenings leading to the fundamentalist / modernist schism fully complete by the 1920s.

The author spends a bit more time discussing all the streams that lead to the Religious Right coalition of the 1970s and onward; the majority of the book, provided in extreme detail, focuses on that Religious Right coalition in its various iterations and the attempts of various Evangelicals to shape political movements and policy over the past 40 years. The author concludes by establishing her purpose: to show that the Evangelicals of today are really no different from the fundamentalists of yore, manifesting the same concerns, and still as alien as ever.

I'm not sure if we needed a book describing the political endeavors of the Evangelicals and its origins, considering that the Evangelicals would be offended by their portrayal and the secularist posture of the author, and I'm not quite sure many secularists are that particularly interested in what motivates Evangelicals...considering, as the author points out well, that the secularists tend to think Evangelicalism has died out as a political force until it arises again and influences elections, and is still summarily otherized or ignored. Nevertheless, we have it, and so:

...for secularists: the book does well to show that you can ignore conservative Christianity, you can summarily dismiss it, you can fear it or otherize it or in whatever various ways consider it a spent force going into decline, and yet it continues to exist and exerts continual influence.

...for conservative Christians: the work gives an opportunity to see how the political work over the past few decades has been managed and how it looks to secularists. Unfortunately it's not a very pretty picture...and it has not helped advance the purposes of God in Christ in His Kingdom.

If you're looking for an actual history of Evangelicalism you're going to have to seek out Noll or others like him. You won't find it here. But if you're looking for all the politics, here it is.

**--galley received as part of an early review program ( )
2 vote deusvitae | Jul 9, 2017 |
Exibindo 5 de 5
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em Russo. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

The evangelical movement began in the revivals of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, known in America as the Great Awakenings. A populist rebellion against the established churches, it became the dominant religious force in the country. During the nineteenth century, white evangelicals split apart dramatically, first North versus South, and then at the end of the century, modernist versus fundamentalist. After World War II, Billy Graham, the revivalist preacher, attracted enormous crowds and tried to gather all Protestants under his big tent, but the civil rights movement and the social revolution of the sixties drove them apart again. By the 1980s, Jerry Falwell, Pat Robertson, and other southern televangelists had formed the Christian right. Protesting abortion and gay rights, they led the South into the Republican Party, and for thirty-five years they were the sole voice of evangelicals to be heard nationally. Eventually a younger generation of leaders protested the Christian right's close ties with the Republican Party and proposed a broader agenda of issues, such as climate change, gender equality, and immigration reform. Evangelicals have in many ways defined the nation. They have shaped our culture and our politics. Evangelicals now constitute twenty-five percent of the American population, but they are no longer monolithic in their politics. They range from Tea Party supporters to social reformers. Still, with the decline of religious faith generally, FitzGerald suggests that evangelical churches must embrace ethnic minorities if they are to survive.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Links rápidos

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.81)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2
2.5
3 3
3.5 2
4 11
4.5 1
5 5

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 157,994,403 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível