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The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O.: A Novel de…
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The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O.: A Novel (edição: 2017)

de Neal Stephenson (Autor)

Séries: D.O.D.O. (1)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1,484819,447 (3.72)55
"Boston, present day. A young man from a shadowy government agency shows up at an Ivy League university and offers an eminent professor a lot of money to study a trove of recently discovered old documents. The only condition: the professor must sign an NDA that would preclude him from publishing his findings, should they be significant. The professor refuses and tells the young man to get lost. On his way out, he bumps into a young woman--a low-on-the-totem-pole adjunct faculty member who's more than happy to sign the NDA and earn a few bucks. The documents, if authentic, are earth-shaking: they prove that magic actually existed and was practiced for much of human history. But its effectiveness began to wane around the time of the scientific revolution and the Age of Enlightenment; it stopped working altogether in 1851 at the time of the Great Exhibition at the Crystal Palace in London. It's not entirely clear why, but it appears that something about the modern world "jams" the "frequencies" used by magic. And so the shadowy government agency--the Department of Diachronic Operations, or DODO--gets cracking on its real mission: to develop a device that is shielded from whatever it is that interferes with magic and thus send Diachronic Operatives back in time to meddle with history"--… (mais)
Membro:aswest
Título:The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O.: A Novel
Autores:Neal Stephenson (Autor)
Informação:William Morrow (2017), Edition: First Edition Later Printing, 768 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Detalhes da Obra

The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O. de Neal Stephenson

  1. 20
    Anathem de Neal Stephenson (Mind_Booster_Noori)
  2. 10
    Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell de Susanna Clarke (amanda4242)
  3. 00
    The Trolley to Yesterday de John Bellairs (themulhern)
    themulhern: The fourth crusade, and siege of Constantinople, are important in both books, which involve time travelers returning to accomplish some task. Who can say Stephenson didn't read Bellairs when he was a kid?
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Inglês (78)  Alemão (2)  Todos os idiomas (80)
Mostrando 1-5 de 80 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Absolutely delightful fun. ( )
  Paperpuss | Aug 20, 2021 |
I had such high hopes for this book.

1) It deals with the way that science and magic might react with each other if they were real.
2) Time travel??
3) It's written as a memoir type narrative by one of the main characters and it's interspersed with diary entries and letter ala Dracula, which is such an interesting concept that isn't used by a lot of authors.

So when I picked it up at the local BAM it was love at first sight. I even cracked it open to make sure I liked the writing style before I bought it and I did! It's really well written and I love the way Mel keeps censoring herself while she writes because women who are stuck in the 1850s don't exactly pepper their diaries with "fuck." At least, none that she's met have.

The book deals with Mel--who's full name is, rather unfortunately, Melisande--a translator of dead languages and her shadowy secret agent crush, Tristan. (Neal Stephenson names his characters like I do.) It follows them in their quest to figure out why magic disappeared from the world in 1851. They figure it out in the first part of the book, which was where my interest waned and left me sticking this 600 page monster on my DNF shelf.

Did I mind that they resolved that little problem less than 100 pages into the book? Nah. I'm sure there's more to keep people occupied. HOWEVER, it's the way it was resolved that made me set the book now. Most of the first 120ish pages are all about physics and how physics is going to solve the magic problem. Normally, I wouldn't have any kind of issue with that. The sciences are interesting and learning about them, even in a fictional setting, can be tons of fun!

But this was like attending a lecture with dialogue and six dudes named Vladimir.

It made things that should have been so SO interesting and left them dry and flat and spoken in an info-dumpy dry tone by a man named Tristan. By the time I finished the first section and finally got the time travel part, I didn't fucking care about anything that was going to happen in the rest of the book. (Especially if it involved Tristan explaining more things.) I hesitate to use the term "man-splaining" (mostly because I hate it and it makes me roll my eyes every time I see it) but, honestly, this kinda strays into that territory.

There were a host of other things that I just... didn't like about this book outside how dry it was, but, for the sake of my sanity and the length of this review I'm going to condense them into a few bullet points:

- They enlist the help of a Japanese-America scientist by calling him "sensei" because that shows that they "respect his culture." I read that and my brain just went ????????????????? Which, I'm not Japanese, so I can't speak to how accurate that is or isn't, but it feels WILDLY condescending and over simplified.

- Mel somehow remembers things word for word months or even YEARS after things happen. I can't even remember what I was doing last Monday other than I watched Kitboga's stream in the evening; so when you ask me to believe that someone can write situations word for word after so much time, it kinda ruins it for me. UPDATE: I just checked the Wikipedia page to see about the spelling of Erszebet's name and the book takes place over FIVE YEARS. I couldn't tell you a single thing that happened to me in 2015, let alone write a detailed narrative of its events!

- Erszebet Karpathy? Annoying. Her whole introduction was entertaining at first. (I mean, a centuries old witch contacting Mel through Facebook? Priceless.) But it quickly devolved into girlish jealousy and Mel feeling inferior because of how Erszebet looked. Girlish jealousy happens in real life all the time, but sometimes I just want to skip it in my fiction. She's also lowkey named after Elizabeth Bathory and that annoys me even more for some reason.

I got to the beginning of the second section and found myself not at all caring what happened to any of the characters. I just... don't care. I tried setting it down for a few days to see if I could muster up enough interest in it to continue. Spoiler? I didn't. I moved onto other things and found myself just staring at it whenever I walked passed my TV stand. I know I don't normally rate the books I DNF, but I felt like I read enough of this one to provide an informed opinion to tack onto a starred rating. ( )
  cthuwu | Jul 28, 2021 |
I listened to the Audible version and it was a really good performance of a really good story. Witches, time travel, little bit of military, history. All in a fun read. ( )
  adnohr | Jun 27, 2021 |
Fun story. Witchcraft, time travel, intrigue, all mixed with some classic military thinking snafus.

Time travel and all of its inconsistencies is not my favorite form of speculative fiction, but this is well done. It doesn't completely make 'sense', but the logic at least hangs together on its own terms.

Neal Stephenson's books are always full of interesting ideas, and this one is no exception. ( )
  jercox | Jun 2, 2021 |
Gave up after ~300 pages. It feels sacrilegious to rate a Neal Stephenson's book two stars, but the plot and characters are ridiculous. It will probably disappoint even fans of Lovecraft & co. We can only assume Neal Stephenson was threatened or blackmailed to put his name on this thing. ( )
  marzagao | Jun 1, 2021 |
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Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Neal Stephensonautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Galland, Nicoleautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Daniels, LukeNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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"Boston, present day. A young man from a shadowy government agency shows up at an Ivy League university and offers an eminent professor a lot of money to study a trove of recently discovered old documents. The only condition: the professor must sign an NDA that would preclude him from publishing his findings, should they be significant. The professor refuses and tells the young man to get lost. On his way out, he bumps into a young woman--a low-on-the-totem-pole adjunct faculty member who's more than happy to sign the NDA and earn a few bucks. The documents, if authentic, are earth-shaking: they prove that magic actually existed and was practiced for much of human history. But its effectiveness began to wane around the time of the scientific revolution and the Age of Enlightenment; it stopped working altogether in 1851 at the time of the Great Exhibition at the Crystal Palace in London. It's not entirely clear why, but it appears that something about the modern world "jams" the "frequencies" used by magic. And so the shadowy government agency--the Department of Diachronic Operations, or DODO--gets cracking on its real mission: to develop a device that is shielded from whatever it is that interferes with magic and thus send Diachronic Operatives back in time to meddle with history"--

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