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The Annotated Chronicles

de Margaret Weis, Tracy Hickman

Outros autores: Todd Lockwood (Artista da capa), Michael Williams (Contribuinte)

Séries: Dragonlance: Chronicles {Weis & Hickman}, Dragonlance - chronological {shared universe} (Omnibus 1-3, Annotated; (Chronicles) 351 AC)

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An annotated edition of three classic Dragonlance novels--Dragons of Autumn Twilight, Dragons of Winter Night, and Dragons of Spring Dawning--is accompanied by extensive commentary by the authors on the world of Krynn and their popular characters. Reprint. 60,000 first printing.
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Classic literature means different things to different people. While the Dragonlance Chronicles will most probably never be considered in the canon of classic literature, it has an important place in molding how we perceive the genre of fantasy today. Tolkien will always reign supreme as the father of modern fantasy. His works set the standards for much of what was to follow in the genre and they managed to break the barrier between fantasy and classic literature. What Dragonlance did for the genre is to move fantasy into the mainstream public eye. I wouldn't necessarily say that Dragonlance is a part of the foundation of modern fantasy, but I would consider Dragonlance (especially the Dragonlance Chronicles) to be a keystone in the gateway to the popularity of fantasy in modern culture today.

The late 70s and early 80s were a tough time for D&D gamers. Controversy about the game was rampant and it was associated with satanism and other negative images by many people who simply did not understand the game. The Dragonlance Chronicles were the first novels released by TSR. These books brought the magic of a Dungeons & Dragons campaign to the masses in a way that introduced people to the genre without them realizing that what they were reading was a stylized version of actual D&D gaming.

I think that what stood out most to me was that these books were no longer tucked away in the back corner of my favorite Walden Books or B. Dalton Booksellers in the mall. I discovered them in a full-fledged display at the front of the store near the register. I admit, I was a little late to the party, the display was advertising the release of Dragons of Spring Dawning, but it was displaying all three books of the Chronicles in their splendid glory. Thick paperback novels with spectacular cover art by Clyde Caldwell that begged the adolescent me to pick them up and find out what exactly they were about. Within seconds, I was asking my dad if I could get the first one of the series and I was hooked from there.

Looking back on it now, the marketing of these novels was brilliant. The artwork, stylized Dragonlance logo and fact that the only mention to Dungeons & Dragons was in a small blurb at the bottom of the back cover (to let those not in the know in on who the heck TSR was) were all brilliant moves in my opinion. All this led to a huge franchise, with many authors who contributed along the way, calendars, merchandise and even a film (although I cringe to mention it.) What it also led to were many other franchises of novels from TSR: The Greyhawk Adventures, Forgotten Realms, Ravenloft and many other fantasy settings saw runs of novels. I also feel that the impact outside of TSR extended throughout the genre and led the way to the popularity of fantasy that we see in fiction, film and television (and almost every aspect of merchandising imaginable) that we enjoy today. When I was growing up in the 70s and 80s, fantasy films were few and far between for someone who was enthralled by the genre. We had the Conan films, Beastmaster, Dragonslayer and several other films that, while usually campy, served as the staple for encouraging game play and our hopes for future films. Now, fantasy is everywhere in film and television and I feel that a big part of that is due to the popularity of the original Dragonlance Chronicles.

In regards to the novels themselves, I feel that they are well written, enjoyable pieces of fantasy fiction that really take the reader along with them on their journey. The real strengths of the novel are the beloved characters that are developed throughout the series. These characters became both our heroes and our friends and we truly mourned when one of them was taken from us. The adventures in these novels are exciting and fun and the stories move quickly with rarely a dull moment to be found. I highly recommend this series for fans of the fantasy genre. They are written in a style that is appealing for almost any age and are a good entry point for those who haven't read much fantasy and are interested in getting into the genre. ( )
  StefanY | Apr 7, 2016 |
The novels that introduced the Dragonlance line, collected in an annotated paperback. — This annotated version of Dragons of Autumn Twilight, Dragons of Winter Night, and Dragons of Spring Dawning contains extensive notes by New York Times bestselling authors Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman, as well as commentary from the original members of the Dragonlance conceptual team. These collected titles launched what has become a flagship line of Wizards of the Coast book publishing. ( )
  MiaSquires | Feb 21, 2014 |
One of my favorite trilogy's from High School. This edition contains some comments from the authors and a few others. Sorta wished for a little bit more on the comments, but overall the story's still the same. ( )
  capiam1234 | Aug 14, 2013 |
One of my favorite trilogy's from High School. This edition contains some comments from the authors and a few others. Sorta wished for a little bit more on the comments, but overall the story's still the same. ( )
  smcamp1234 | Aug 14, 2013 |
It was a nice treat to reread the classic DragonLance Chronicles. This Trilogy (Dragons of Autumn Twilight, Dragons of Winter Night, Dragons of Spring Dawning) launched a long list of sequels, prequels and other DL stories. I first read these back in high school and they still are fun. Their charm and downfall as good fantasy writing are the same thing. The set of characters is a prototypical 'balanced' Dungeons & Dragons party, covering all the bases of character class and race. As I recall, the classes were Fighter (Caramon), Ranger (Tanis), Paladin (Sturm), Barbarian (Riverwind), Thief (Tasslehoff), Cleric (Goldmoon), Mage (Raistlin), Dwarf (Flint), Elf (Laurana) and Half-Elf (Tanis again). I guess a half-orc was just too much. Now, in its defense, the novels were based on a set of D&D modules (adventure outlines) written by Hickman, Douglas Niles and Jeff Grubb. Margaret Weis was an aspiring writer working as TSR book editor and their gaming group decided to write a novel about their DL campaign. The first book was successful (as were the modules) and a trilogy was completed. The storyline deviated farther and farther from their game story to make for better writing and they became quite popular in the nerd sect. Most mainstream media critics either hated the books or wouldn't even bother reviewing them, since they were 'pulp' fantasy. I say they are pretty good, not great, and are worthy of a place on any fantasy shelf.
As far as the story, a group of adventurers from the treehouse town of Solace are returning from a five year quest to find any sign of the true Gods who had been missing in the realm of Krynn since the Cataclysm hundreds of years earlier (two parenthetical notes here-two Meetings trilogies and two Preludes trilogies were later written to cover these years and before, and also there will be mention of the Cataclysm in my write-up of the superior Legends set). This allows introductions of the characters in the form of old friends meeting again after years apart, which I always liked. The characters return after their adventures to Solace bearing reports of war in the north (Krynn is a southern hemisphere land) and reports of dragons and dragonarmies. Clerics of a false religion called Seekers have taken over Solace and when a Plainswoman bearing a crystal staff seeks refuge in Solace, the group flees the town with them when the Seekers demand their arrest. The staff is the Staff of Mishakal, the old goddess of healing. Thus bearing proof of the return of the gods, hijinks and adventures ensue, Elves are snotty but good hearted, the Dragonarmies are eventually defeated and a good time was had by all.
Well, not really all. The characters are all pretty interesting and have many great things and horrible things happen along the way. You know-love, death, joy, humor, goofy absentminded wizards, fighting Draconian soldiers (humanoid Dragonkin). To me, There are two aspects of the tales that I really enjoyed. The first is Tasslehoff, the kender. Kender are hobbit-like little people that have a talent for 'borrowing' things and are generally considered a major nuisance by all. But Tas is one of the funniest characters I have ever read. His relationship with Flint, the typical grumpy dwarf, is great. You have to read the books to really appreciate this but they are like an Oscar and Felix Odd Couple. Also, the red-robed (soon to be black-robed) mage Raistlin and his twin brother Caramon are also well thought out characters. Caramon is a great swordsman and Raistlin is a frail and sickly mage. Raistlin is very selfish and uncaring but extremely powerful. However, he has a soft spot for the weak and downtrodden, as he once was himself as a child. This gives him some 'evil Gandalf' type mojo. The subsequent Legends trilogy is mostly about Raistlin and Caramon.
As a wrapup, the story is good but the characters are great, even if the mix is a typically unrealistic D&D group. I believe that Weis and Hickman really grew as writers with this trilogy and went on to better things later, but the Chronicles will always have a special spot in my nerdy heart. The Annotated Chronicles omnibus is the best way to go, because you get an insight into the ideas and growth of the authors and, even though an introduction says nay, the spoiler factor of the annotation is minimal and, in my opinion, lets you appreciate the story far more. I have no problem with a few *"This foreshadows future events..." notes. I don't recall anything that would ruin the story at all. ( )
  DirtPriest | Sep 13, 2010 |
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Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Weis, Margaretautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Hickman, Tracyautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Lockwood, ToddArtista da capaautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Williams, MichaelContribuinteautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
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An annotated edition of three classic Dragonlance novels--Dragons of Autumn Twilight, Dragons of Winter Night, and Dragons of Spring Dawning--is accompanied by extensive commentary by the authors on the world of Krynn and their popular characters. Reprint. 60,000 first printing.

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