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All the Gallant Men: An American Sailor's…
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All the Gallant Men: An American Sailor's Firsthand Account of Pearl… (edição: 2016)

de Donald Stratton (Autor)

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1746119,811 (4.07)5
At 8:06 a.m. on December 7, 1941, Seaman First Class Donald Stratton was consumed by an inferno. A million pounds of explosives had detonated beneath his battle station aboard the USS Arizona, barely fifteen minutes into Japan's surprise attack on American forces at Pearl Harbor. Near death and burned across two thirds of his body, Don, a 19-year-old Nebraskan who had been steeled by the Great Depression and Dust Bowl, summoned the will to haul himself hand over hand across a rope tethered to a neighboring vessel. Forty-five feet below, the harbor's flaming, oil-slick water boiled with enemy bullets; all around him the world tore itself apart. In this eyewitness account of the Pearl Harbor attack -- the first memoir by a survivor of the USS Arizona -- 94-year-old Donald Stratton shares his tale of bravery and survival on December 7, 1941, his harrowing recovery, and his determination to return to the fight. Don and four other sailors made it safely across the same line that morning, a small miracle on a day that claimed the lives of 1,177 of their Arizona shipmates -- approximately half the American fatalities at Pearl Harbor. Sent to military hospitals for a year, Don refused doctors' advice to amputate his limbs and battled to relearn how to walk. The U.S. Navy gave him a medical discharge, believing he would never again be fit for service, but Don had unfinished business. In June 1944, he sailed back into the teeth of the Pacific War on a destroyer, destined for combat in the crucial battles of Leyte Gulf, Luzon, and Okinawa, thus earning the distinction of having been present for the opening shots and the final major battle of America's Second World War. As the 75th anniversary of the Pearl Harbor attacks approaches, Don, a great-grandfather of five and one of six living survivors of the Arizona, offers an intimate reflection on the tragedy that drew America into the greatest armed conflict in history.… (mais)
Membro:efurrow
Título:All the Gallant Men: An American Sailor's Firsthand Account of Pearl Harbor
Autores:Donald Stratton (Autor)
Informação:William Morrow (2016), Edition: 1st, 320 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
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All the Gallant Men: An American Sailor's Firsthand Account of Pearl Harbor de Donald Stratton

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I need to buy this for my library. It is an easy read that will appeal to my boys who love war stories. Bonus that it is a memoir with a photo insert section. It made me cry in places, the horror and heartbreak of the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor was well written and detailed enough to get to me but not make me ill. The poem that Eleanor Roosevelt carried around in her wallet for the rest of her life is worth reprinting here.

Dear Lord,
Lest I continue
My complacent way,
Help me to remember that somewhere,
Somehow out there
A man died for me today.
As long as there be war,
I must answer
Am I worth dying for?
( )
  readingbeader | Oct 29, 2020 |
All The Gallant Men: An America Sailor’s Firsthand Account of Pearl Harbor, Donald Stratton, Ken Gire, authors; Mike Ortego, narrator.
Donald Stratton was 94 years old (now 97) when he wrote his memoir to commemorate the December 7th, 1941 bombing of Pearl Harbor. He believed, as the quote he references says, “when a person dies, it is like a library burns down.” He wanted to preserve his memories of that day for future generations. Pearl Harbor was an attack on this nation by a country that was actively engaged in duplicitous peace talks with America’s envoys. Japan’s act of war was a sneak attack of enormous magnitude for which they would ultimately pay dearly, but so did America. The book points out not only their heinous behavior, but it also shows the naïveté of the government, during this time, when Hitler was rising to power and advancing across Europe. We were asleep at the wheel, basking in an arrogant attitude of superiority, assuming we were safe even though all the signs of this act of war were on the horizon. Had there not been failures in communication, perhaps the dead and wounded of Pearl Harbor would not have numbered so many.
Donald is a survivor of the attack that “will live in infamy”, in the words of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. He carries his battle scarred body and memories with him everyday. Brought up in the Plains, poor, but faithful, he and his family were a tight knit unit with the belief that no matter what happened, G-d would provide for their welfare. Devout, they attended church in the best and the worst of times. The Sears Catalogue was their lifeline to the rest of the world, and it was through those pages that he learned what else was available to those who were better off, to those who lived elsewhere; he learned what was available to those who were not sharecroppers living basically from hand to mouth, using potato sacking for clothing and subsisting on kitchen gardens. With two younger brothers and a sister, he lived in four rooms with an outhouse. There were two bedrooms, a wood stove for cooking and a stove in the fireplace used for heat. Yet they remained content as a family unit.
The times were different then and so it seems was the outlook on life. America was loved by patriots all over the United States, and they would eagerly step up to the plate when needed for its survival. Today, times seem a bit different. Today patriotism, especially associated with nationalism, is considered a “dirty word”; our flag is often disrespected, and those who profess love for the country are sometimes called “deplorables”. After reading his book, I can only hope that when the call comes to defend our shores, there will be men and women who are as brave as he was, who will stand up for what is just and right, and who will exhibit the valorous behavior that Stratton did.
Donald’s story is one of deep devotion to his country. Even though he was gravely burned in the Pearl Harbor attack, as soon as he was able, he reenlisted and went back to fight with his “band of brothers”. His desire is to keep the memory of Pearl Harbor alive, as we must keep the memory of 9/11 alive, because forgetting might help to lay the groundwork for another sneak attack on our country. To me, his message affirms and asserts that we must be prepared, and we must be ready to defend ourselves and our great nation.
The narrator of this book spoke in a measured town which conveyed the story without undue emotional involvement, therefore making the reenactment of that horrific day tolerable and comprehensible for the reader. The story of Stratton is both moving and inspiring. I hope the young adults of today, who have been coddled and brought up to expect life on a silver platter, will be up to the task if it ever arises. ( )
  thewanderingjew | Apr 13, 2019 |
Captivating memoir from a survivor of the USS Arizona. ( )
  encephalical | Feb 17, 2019 |
5533. All the Gallant Men An American Sailor's Firsthand Account of Pearl Harbor, by Donald Stratton with Ken Gire (read 18 Feb 2018) The main author of this book was born 14 July 1922 in Inavale, Neb. and when he was 17 he enlisted in the Navy. He was assigned to the USS Arizona and this book tells of what he went through on Dec 7, 1941. The account of his narrow escape and the terrific injuries he received is well told and is wrenching and almost incredible. He had a long period of recovery from his injuries, his weight going down to 74 pounds. After he had recovered from his horrific injuries he was discharged, and for a time went back to Red Cloud, where his parents lived. But in 1944 he was able to reenlist in the Navy and saw action in the Pacific again. He married in 1950 and his career as a civilian was very strenuous, even though he had residual effects from his Pearl Harbor injuries. He was in his nineties when he wrote, with help, this book. Over the years he has often returned to Pear Harbor. I found this an a gripping story and one has to admire him for his heroic work in the war and for his strenuous life since. It is as good an account of what happened to him at Pearl Harbor as one could hope to read. ( )
  Schmerguls | Feb 18, 2018 |
Don Stratton is a 94 year old man from Red Cloud, Nebraska. When he was 19 years old, he joined the navy and was on the USS Arizona at Pearl Harbor. The Arizona was only at Pearl Habor because another ship, The Oklahoma, bumped into the Arizona while on a training run. In the book, he talks about some of his shipmates, including the band, thought of as the best band in the fleet. When not playing, the band members worked loading ammunition into the big guns. Stratton goes through the attack and the bombs that hit the Arizona finally igniting all the ammunition and destroying the ship and most of the men on board, including the band. Stratton and others on the gun, were badly burned with no way off the ship. The Arizona had been paired with a repair ship, The Vestal. One of the men on the Vestal, Joe George, had a reputation for fighting and insubordination. He threw a rope over to the Arizona for Stratton and four or five others who were all already badly burned were able to use the rope to get to the Vestal. George had been ordered by his captain to cut the rope but refused so Stratton and the others were saved although they wouldn't all survive for long. The Arizona had over 1100 men and slightly more than 450 survived. At the time of the book's publication there were only 5 still alive, including Stratton. He spends some time talking about his treatment and then he was discharged and he returned home to Red Cloud. It took over a year to recover although he would always have scars. He then rejoined the navy and served on another ship until the end of the war. Stratton talked about visiting the memorial to the ship at Pearl Harbor. During one visit, the Japanese man in charge of the first wave of bombers had gotten religion, spent time with Billy Graham, and was on hand for the 75th anniversary. Stratton and some of the others couldn't bring themselves to shake hands with him. In the book, he also goes over the warnings ignored by those in high command that might have led to fewer deaths and less destruction. Overall a good book although not particularly deep.
  taurus27 | Feb 7, 2017 |
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At 8:06 a.m. on December 7, 1941, Seaman First Class Donald Stratton was consumed by an inferno. A million pounds of explosives had detonated beneath his battle station aboard the USS Arizona, barely fifteen minutes into Japan's surprise attack on American forces at Pearl Harbor. Near death and burned across two thirds of his body, Don, a 19-year-old Nebraskan who had been steeled by the Great Depression and Dust Bowl, summoned the will to haul himself hand over hand across a rope tethered to a neighboring vessel. Forty-five feet below, the harbor's flaming, oil-slick water boiled with enemy bullets; all around him the world tore itself apart. In this eyewitness account of the Pearl Harbor attack -- the first memoir by a survivor of the USS Arizona -- 94-year-old Donald Stratton shares his tale of bravery and survival on December 7, 1941, his harrowing recovery, and his determination to return to the fight. Don and four other sailors made it safely across the same line that morning, a small miracle on a day that claimed the lives of 1,177 of their Arizona shipmates -- approximately half the American fatalities at Pearl Harbor. Sent to military hospitals for a year, Don refused doctors' advice to amputate his limbs and battled to relearn how to walk. The U.S. Navy gave him a medical discharge, believing he would never again be fit for service, but Don had unfinished business. In June 1944, he sailed back into the teeth of the Pacific War on a destroyer, destined for combat in the crucial battles of Leyte Gulf, Luzon, and Okinawa, thus earning the distinction of having been present for the opening shots and the final major battle of America's Second World War. As the 75th anniversary of the Pearl Harbor attacks approaches, Don, a great-grandfather of five and one of six living survivors of the Arizona, offers an intimate reflection on the tragedy that drew America into the greatest armed conflict in history.

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