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Blitzed: Drugs in the Third Reich de Norman…
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Blitzed: Drugs in the Third Reich (edição: 2018)

de Norman Ohler (Autor), Shaun Whiteside (Tradutor)

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5952129,390 (3.93)18
The Nazi regime preached an ideology of physical, mental, and moral purity. But as Norman Ohler reveals in this history, the Third Reich was saturated with drugs. On the eve of World War II, Germany was a pharmaceutical powerhouse, and companies such as Merck and Bayer cooked up cocaine, opiates, and, most of all, methamphetamines, to be consumed by everyone from factory workers to housewives to millions of German soldiers. In fact, troops regularly took rations of a form of crystal meth -- the elevated energy and feelings of invincibility associated with the high even help to explain certain German military victories. Drugs seeped all the way up to the Nazi high command and, especially, to Hitler himself. Over the course of the war, Hitler became increasingly dependent on injections of a cocktail of drugs -- including a form of heroin -- administered by his personal doctor. While drugs alone cannot explain the Nazis' toxic racial theories or the events of World War II, Ohler's investigation makes the case that, if drugs are not taken into account, our understanding of the Third Reich is fundamentally incomplete.… (mais)
Membro:SWilson618
Título:Blitzed: Drugs in the Third Reich
Autores:Norman Ohler (Autor)
Outros autores:Shaun Whiteside (Tradutor)
Informação:Mariner Books (2018), Edition: Illustrated, 304 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
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Blitzed: Drugs in the Third Reich de Norman Ohler

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» Veja também 18 menções

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Mostrando 1-5 de 21 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
I found this to be a well-written account from a novel perspective. Detailed and engaging, and tries to fill in a perceived gap in the story we tell about the second World War and the people who took part. ( )
  fidgetyfern | Feb 23, 2021 |
"Hitler was a bad guy and was addicted to drugs" is pretty widely known, but this book goes deeply into his personal physician/pusher Theodor Morell, the scale and scope of his addiction, and the extensive use of drugs (methamphetamine, Oxycodone, and various animal endocrine extracts) throughout both German civilian society and the military, government, and intelligence services. ( )
  octal | Jan 1, 2021 |
Il 31 ottobre 1937, gli stabilimenti Temmler registrarono all'Ufficio brevetti di Berlino la prima metilanfetamina tedesca. Nome commerciale: Pervitin. La nuova versione dei farmaci "rivitalizzanti" si diffuse in maniera capillare nella società dell'epoca. (fonte: Google Books)
  MemorialeSardoShoah | Jun 1, 2020 |
A Review of "Blitzed: Drugs in the Third Reich" By Norman Ohler

Blitzed was a fascinating read. One of my special areas of interest is the rise of the Nazi party in Germany and of the influence wielded by Adolf Hitler. In the many books I’ve read on subject there were always hints of drug addictions and Nazi interest in the occult. In this book, Norman Ohler has done a fantastic job of bringing the former to light. With an entire book devoted to the subject, the reader is introduced to the particulars of how some of today’s well known drugs were discovered and used in the early 20th century, and how they came to be tested, used, and abused in Nazi Germany.

The book can sometimes be slow but not so slow that I was tempted to give up on it. I’m glad I finished it since it gave me a better understanding of how drugs influenced some of the leaders and how they provided a boost to the common soldier.

Anyhow, I recommend this book. Not just because it clarifies so much of our understanding of the Nazi state, but because it demonstrates how some of the challenges we face today in terms of drug addiction began. Be aware though...this is a book on Nazi Germany. As you can imagine, there will be many stories on how the effect of these drugs were tested. Some on German soldiers, some on civilians, but the worst on those who were considered quite expendable: the Jews. It is not easy to read some of these passages. But it is important to remember that this happened in modern times and in a supposedly civilized western European nation.

Read it, you won’t regret it. ( )
  enoch_elijah | May 10, 2020 |
You wouldn't think it would be possible to write new and fascinating stuff on Hitler and the Second World War nowadays, but somehow people keep managing it. Norman Ohler's racy but well-researched contribution to this field, Blitzed, is compelling from first page to last. In less than 300 pages, Ohler looks at the German prosecution of the war from the surprisingly fruitful perspective of drug abuse.

This is done in four long chapters (each split up into shorter sections to make it accessible). The first chapter goes into the pre-war background of drugged Germany: its social acceptance of uppers, its pioneering chemical industry, and the Nazis' hypocritical public campaign against the culture. The second chapter goes into the use of hard drugs by German soldiers, with Ohler arguing that its extensive deployment – as a matter of official policy – was responsible for the success of the early 'blitzkrieg' operations of 1940-1, allowing soldiers to go days without rest and at a constant peak of hyper-aggression, bamboozling their enemies. The third chapter delves into Hitler's relationship with his personal physician, Dr Morell, and his increasing dependency on drug cocktails – cocaine, meth, oxy, and plenty besides. The fourth chapter is a sort of amalgam of the previous two, not only looking at German attempts to create a 'miracle drug' alongside their other 'miracle weapons', but also into Hitler's physiological decline in the final year of the war.

It is constantly fascinating. Ohler's thesis, in short, is that much of the course of the war in Europe was heavily influenced by the use of hard drugs by both the military rank-and-file and the Nazi hierarchy, and he backs it up with a lot of footnoted archival research. With a background as a journalist and novelist rather than an academic historian, Ohler writes engagingly. One passage on page 87, which juxtaposes the explosive violence of the blitzkrieg invasion of May 1940 with the explosive violence of meth 'in German brains', is particularly well done.

That said, the book is far from the final word, and must be read critically. A number of prominent historians have lambasted the book – the most frequent claim being that it makes gross generalizations, lacking the sense of proportion that distinguishes a truly sober and collaborative history book – with Professor Richard J. Evans going so far as to call it a book for the 'alternative facts' generation, suggesting that it dangerously seeks to absolve Germany of its moral responsibility by claiming neither Hitler or the German populace were of sound mind. Evans has also noted that in the English edition of Blitzed, the preface from the German edition (where Ohler admits he took a 'skewed perspective', the better to illuminate) has been inexplicably removed. Other historians, it should be said, have praised the book – including Ian Kershaw and Antony Beevor – but there's plenty of lebensraum for scepticism.

Certainly, the book lacks some judiciousness. Ohler has an attractive idea – that drugs determined the course of the war – and he really runs with it. No doubt there are occasions where drug abuse did play an important part (Hitler's meeting with Mussolini that kept Italy in the war, for example (pg. 171)) and many more where it was a factor. But if you were to read Blitzed without any awareness of historical arguments and orthodoxy, you would think that the war could be explained away solely by methamphetamine, with no regard for military strategy, technology, geopolitics, personality, chance, or any of the other things that historians weigh up when trying to explain complex events. Even if Ohler doesn't mean for it to be the case, his narrative deployment and use of language certainly encourages the panacea, if you read it too uncritically. Despite his extensive primary source research, Ohler is no historian when it comes to sober judgement. When he dismissively claims the 'Halt Order' at Dunkirk "cannot be explained rationally" (pg. 100), or erroneously claims that Spitfires "conquered the sky" during the same operation (pg. 101), he shows himself to be more of a journalist; a historian would, at the very least, tie off these loose ends. The RAF did not establish air superiority over Dunkirk – as the bitter Stuka-strafed soldiers on the beach attested quite vocally – and there are legitimate arguments to be made about why the Halt Order was called – British resistance was increased, Guderian's supply line was dangerously over-run, the 'blitzkrieg' strategy was unproven, there was a risk of a French counterattack as had happened in the First World War, and so on. Take Ohler's pill and enjoy the trip, but be aware of the risk.

Nevertheless, Blitzed brings a breath of fresh air to the often dry and bleak genre of Third Reich scholarship. It forces you to look at well-established historical events through a new and refreshing lens, even if you don't go all the way with the author's conclusions. It still has an aura of pop-psychology about it, despite its extensive research (on the Acknowledgements page, for example, Ohler says the idea for the book came from a DJ, whilst the title was suggested by Michael Stipe of R.E.M.), but if Blitzed is more Jon Ronson than Ian Kershaw, there's still a place for that. The book is chillingly contemporary, with ordinary soldiers and civilians taking drugs just to get them through the day, or risk losing out to those who do seize this short-term advantage. One cannot read of the German development of big pharma, of synthesized drugs like heroin and uppers and oxy, without thinking of the sickness of our modern society. And hanging over it all like a malignant poison is Hitler, the rat-like tweaker, emerging with chemical aid from his pathetic self-pity to clap "everyone he met jovially on the shoulder" (pg. 189), as he scurries about, burning the world around him. ( )
  Mike_F | Mar 15, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 21 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Ohler’s skill as a novelist makes his book far more readable than these scholarly investigations, but it’s at the expense of truth and accuracy, and that’s too high a price to pay in such a historically sensitive area.
adicionado por 2wonderY | editarThe Guardian, Richard J. Evans (Nov 16, 2016)
 

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Whiteside, ShaunTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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It was also cheap: the military average dose, Ranke calculated, came to four tablets per day, which at the pharmacist's purchase price amounted to 16 pfennigs, while coffee worked out at about 50 pfennigs a night - "So these stimulants are more economical."
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The Nazi regime preached an ideology of physical, mental, and moral purity. But as Norman Ohler reveals in this history, the Third Reich was saturated with drugs. On the eve of World War II, Germany was a pharmaceutical powerhouse, and companies such as Merck and Bayer cooked up cocaine, opiates, and, most of all, methamphetamines, to be consumed by everyone from factory workers to housewives to millions of German soldiers. In fact, troops regularly took rations of a form of crystal meth -- the elevated energy and feelings of invincibility associated with the high even help to explain certain German military victories. Drugs seeped all the way up to the Nazi high command and, especially, to Hitler himself. Over the course of the war, Hitler became increasingly dependent on injections of a cocktail of drugs -- including a form of heroin -- administered by his personal doctor. While drugs alone cannot explain the Nazis' toxic racial theories or the events of World War II, Ohler's investigation makes the case that, if drugs are not taken into account, our understanding of the Third Reich is fundamentally incomplete.

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