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If Our Bodies Could Talk: Operating and…
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If Our Bodies Could Talk: Operating and Maintaining a Human Body (edição: 2017)

de James Hamblin (Autor)

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"If you want to understand the strange workings of the human body, and the future of medicine, you must read this illuminating, engaging book." --Siddhartha Mukherjee,author of the Gene In 2014, James Hamblin launched a series of videos for The Atlantic called "If Our Bodies Could Talk." With it, the doctor-turned-journalist established himself as a seriously entertaining authority in the field of health. Now, in illuminating and genuinely funny prose, Hamblin explores the human stories behind health questions that never seem to go away--and which tend to be mischaracterized and oversimplified by marketing and news media. He covers topics such as sleep, aging, diet, and much more: Can I "boost" my immune system? Does caffeine make me live longer? Do we still not know if cell phones cause cancer? How much sleep do I actually need? Is there any harm in taking a multivitamin? Is life long enough? In considering these questions, Hamblin draws from his own medical training as well from hundreds of interviews with distinguished scientists and medical practitioners. He translates the (traditionally boring) textbook of human anatomy and physiology into accessible, engaging, socially contextualized, up-to-the-moment answers. They offer clarity, examine the limits of our certainty, and ultimately help readers worry less about things that don't really matter. If Our Bodies Could Talk is a comprehensive, illustrated guide that entertains and educates in equal doses"-- "An empirical, exhaustive, and entertaining look at the body and its functions, in the vein of the author's stories and viral video series for The Atlantic on sleep, aging, diet, and more, examining and reassessing those health concerns that never seem to go away"--… (mais)
Membro:funktanaka
Título:If Our Bodies Could Talk: Operating and Maintaining a Human Body
Autores:James Hamblin (Autor)
Informação:Anchor (2017), Edition: Illustrated, 400 pages
Coleções:Para ler
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If Our Bodies Could Talk: A Guide to Operating and Maintaining a Human Body de James Hamblin

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Mostrando 1-5 de 6 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
It took me ages to read this book, but that's not because I wasn't into it - it just sort of lends itself to being picked up and put down by virtue of its layout. I loved all the little snippets of information and the humour in Hamblin's writing, but also that this book about facts behind human anatomy and function also included the political. Here are two of my favourite quotes from the book, the first about how tobacco companies are evil, and the second on how female sexual health deserves more study and respect.

"The classic example of purposeful ignorance is that created by the tobacco industry. Ever since tobacco was clearly proven to cause lung cancer in the 1960's, the industry has attempted to cultivate doubt in science itself. It cannot refute the facts of cigarettes, so it turned the public opinion against knowledge. Can anything really be known? The strategy was brilliant. Proctor calls out 'alternative causation,' or simply, 'experts disagree.' Tobacco companies didn't have to disprove the fact that smoking causes cancer; all they had to do was imply that there are 'experts' on 'both sides' of a 'debate' on the subject. And then righteously say that everyone is entitled to their belief. The tactic was so effective that it bought the industry decades to profit while reasonable people were uncertain if cigarettes caused cancer."

"...Pfizer publically abandoned the idea of marketing Viagra to women in 2004 because, as the New York Times put it, women 'are a lot more complicated than men.' Filling their organs with blood does not solve the problem of low libido, which is much more common than it is in men. This problem is much more complex than a simple lack of blood flow, and to overlook its causes in favor of simply diverting blood to the genitals would be dangerous. To that end, the truest 'female Viagra' is cultural prioritization of female sexual health, and that won't come in a pill. ( )
  katebrarian | Jul 28, 2020 |
I listened to this book over the course of a week plus every day while I swam. It was the perfect way to digest it. I would have likely skimmed/skipped had I read it in words. The information was organized nicely and presented well. There were more than a few times where Hamblin's wit nearly drowned me. It is hard to snort a laugh safely when your face is in the water.

He did get a little preachy with the nutrition entries and that got pretty darned annoying but overall, it was an interesting and informative read. ( )
  susandennis | Jun 5, 2020 |
My favorite line from this book.

"Gluten sensitivity is less about our relationship to gluten than it is our relationship to knowledge."

That should give you the flavor of Dr. Hamblin's writing. The book is an interesting and sometimes entertaining survey of what we know about maintaining ourselves. All of it subject to change, or course, as we learn more. An essential read? Probably not. But as a $2.99 Bookbub selection, well worth the investment. ( )
  chrisodva | Jun 16, 2019 |
What is Cancer? Is smoking really bad for you? How many multivitamins should I take per day? Does Vitamin C actually prevent Colds and the Flu? What is a vaccine and how does it work? Why do we tan?

Let’s face it, our bodies are complicated. How is anyone meant to keep up with all of the garbage being printed about such things as supplements and methods to grow taller? Well, look no further than this book! With If Our Bodies Could Talk, James Hamblin has found an easy way to confer answers upon those of us without medical knowledge.

Apparently, the man has a blog or a podcast, but I am not certain of that. Hamblin covers the whole of the body, though. From ruminating on whether or not a contact lens can find itself lodged in your brain (nope) to questions on how tattoos are dissolved by lasers (the laser breaks up the globs of ink into a size your body can excrete) you can find the answers here.

The book runs as a conversation. Someone has a question, and that question is answered. It gets a bit more complicated than that, however, when the question turns in a rambling meandering path. Sometimes it is difficult to tell where Hamblin is headed, but he always manages to find the answer in the end. The human body runs the gamut from the hilarious to the slightly macabre and Hamblin is not afraid to dive right in.

The book is divided into six main sections. The human body is considered an organism, which is interesting considering how most anatomy textbooks are organized. Most doctors are some sort of specialist. You have separate doctors that you see for your shoulder, gastrointestinal tract, and brain. While this glut of information may not be particularly bad, it is somewhat disconcerting. It just goes to show how much there really is to know. For example, around 8 percent of your DNA is viral; that is to say, it is from a virus. The same thing goes for your body’s cells; most of the cells in your body are bacteria and other such things. You wouldn’t be alive for long if a genie suddenly got rid of all of that.

Along with the text are entertaining little pictures and cartoons that show the structure of skin for example, or a graph that displays sleep cycles. This makes the book more charming by comparison to something that would not have that, and by extension, more accessible as well. I would recommend this book if you have ever had any questions about your body and wanted to ask some guy who went through medical school and left to become a journalist. That isn't to say that the book is bad though. ( )
  Floyd3345 | Jun 15, 2019 |
Best for: You, assuming you like quality science writing, humor, and an unexpected amount of social justice talk.

In a nutshell: Journalist and doctor answers questions about our bodies.

Line that sticks with me: (mostly because it’s demonstrative of the author’s dry humor) “But in search of an actual definition, Cleveland clinic begs the question. “Sudden cardiac death is a sudden, unexpected death caused by loss of heart function.” (You guys, why do you have a website?)” p289

Why I chose it: Stopped by the bookstore looking for travel books for an upcoming trip. Saw this (autographed copy to boot, which means sadly I missed his visit to Seattle), flipped through the table of contents, and knew I had to own it immediately.

Review: Ack! So good! This 350-page book is broken down into six sections - Appearing, Perceiving, Eating, Drinking, Relating, and Enduring. And while there are a dozen or so questions in each section, the responses aren’t exactly what you’d expect - they are even better. For example, a question as simple as “What are sunburns?” is answered with a discussion of what sunburns are that eventually leads to a discussion of health disparities and the Watts riots. A question about whether we need to drink 8 glasses of water is the start of a broader discussion about sweat, and juice, and vitaminwater.

It gets better. Dr. Hamblin discusses disparities in care for trans individuals, and the inherent patriarchal bias in how we look at (or don’t - the nipple discussion is fascinating) our different body parts. He tackles ‘gluten sensitivity’ and lactose tolerance (seriously, he points out that lactose intolerance is a weird and sort of racist way to frame it, considering the majority of the world’s population is not lactose tolerant), and spends a whole chunk of the book on aging and dying.

This isn’t a straightforward ‘ask question - get answer’ book; it’s more an opportunity for Dr. Hamblin to quickly answer basic questions and then use them as jumping off points for deeper and more interesting discussions. And it’s so funny. Not constant, joke-joke-joke funny, but witty and dry. I guffawed and laughed out loud multiple times. Nothing is straightforward - I don’t think he ever actually says whether we need to drink 8 glasses of water a day (or more, or less) - but that’s not exactly the point. The point is a discussion about hydration, and dehydration, and over-hydration. It got me thinking about many of the topics in ways I hadn’t before.

Go. Read this. ( )
  ASKelmore | Jul 8, 2017 |
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"If you want to understand the strange workings of the human body, and the future of medicine, you must read this illuminating, engaging book." --Siddhartha Mukherjee,author of the Gene In 2014, James Hamblin launched a series of videos for The Atlantic called "If Our Bodies Could Talk." With it, the doctor-turned-journalist established himself as a seriously entertaining authority in the field of health. Now, in illuminating and genuinely funny prose, Hamblin explores the human stories behind health questions that never seem to go away--and which tend to be mischaracterized and oversimplified by marketing and news media. He covers topics such as sleep, aging, diet, and much more: Can I "boost" my immune system? Does caffeine make me live longer? Do we still not know if cell phones cause cancer? How much sleep do I actually need? Is there any harm in taking a multivitamin? Is life long enough? In considering these questions, Hamblin draws from his own medical training as well from hundreds of interviews with distinguished scientists and medical practitioners. He translates the (traditionally boring) textbook of human anatomy and physiology into accessible, engaging, socially contextualized, up-to-the-moment answers. They offer clarity, examine the limits of our certainty, and ultimately help readers worry less about things that don't really matter. If Our Bodies Could Talk is a comprehensive, illustrated guide that entertains and educates in equal doses"-- "An empirical, exhaustive, and entertaining look at the body and its functions, in the vein of the author's stories and viral video series for The Atlantic on sleep, aging, diet, and more, examining and reassessing those health concerns that never seem to go away"--

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