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The Princess Troll (The Seattle Trolls…
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The Princess Troll (The Seattle Trolls Trilogy Book 2) (edição: 2016)

de Leah R. Cutter (Autor)

Séries: Seattle Trolls (2)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaConversas
3120783,402 (3.63)Nenhum(a)
Most trolls have no natural magical ability. However, Christine does. Enchanted powders swirl up when she walks by. Charms glow.What happens when Christine tries to direct her magical powers?Nothing. Nada. Zip.Something blocks Christine from reaching her full magical potential.But what?"The Princess Troll"--the second novel in The Seattle Trolls trilogy and the delightful continuation "The Changeling Troll"--follows Christine on her journeys through a skewed Seattle and her encounters with outrageous and whimsical characters. A coming of age tale for all ages!… (mais)
Membro:M_Sawtelle
Título:The Princess Troll (The Seattle Trolls Trilogy Book 2)
Autores:Leah R. Cutter (Autor)
Informação:Book View Cafe (2016), 176 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:****
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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The Princess Troll de Leah R. Cutter

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Mostrando 1-5 de 20 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Yet another fantastic read from Leah R Cutter! Christine's story continues. From finding out she's a changeling in book 1 to discovering her royal heritage in this book. The story is absolutely enthralling. ( )
  UrbanAudreyE | May 9, 2020 |
Esta resenha foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Resenhistas do LibraryThing.
I’ve always enjoyed my visits to Seattle - good people, good food and drink, and plenty to do, no matter your particular mix of urban or natural interests. And it’s a great setting for my latest read - my introduction to a hidden side, a hidden depth of the Emerald City.

Maybe I should have taken that “Underground Seattle” tour they offer. It might have prepared me for this read ... well ... maybe.

I prefer to start most things - especially books and book or film series - from the beginning, and proceed upward and onward from there. But it doesn’t always work that way ... which was the case for me, when I received a review copy of “The Princess Troll,” the second installment of the “Seattle Trolls Trilogy” by Leah Cutter ... a writer who was unknown to me until I received a copy of this book from LibraryThing.

“Princes Troll” is the second novel in “a new-adult, urban fantasy trilogy that turns the ugly duckling story on its head.” And while I did find myself starting in the middle, I did not find myself lost, constantly interrupting the narrative with “wait ... what?” moments. There was enough in this second installment to pique my interest, draw me into the story, and leave me looking ahead - and back! - for more.

Even without any tedious prologues, or digressions to the first novel, it didn’t take me long to realize that Christine is NOT your average girl. The realization of just how ‘not average’ she is grows, page by page, chapter by chapter. And it’s not just Christine, but a cast of supporting characters that are colorful and crazy ... even by Seattle standards!

There is magic, mystery and mayhem in this story. If it were simply a story of Christine dealing with the magic and mystery, the story would be alright. But then there’s that mayhem, and not just the stuff of fantasy. She has identity issues, family issues, relationship issues, and all that ... and so much more. Whatever Christine was and is, and whatever she may become, is not something I would call ‘average.’

There is some resolution to some of these issues, and some progress in Christine’s life and development ... SOME, but nothing FINAL ... well, this IS a trilogy after all. And like all good episodic tales, you sense there are some added, unknown complications, unexpected challenges lurking somewhere in the shadows, ready to spring out at a most-inappropriate moment.

Is Christine up to the challenge? I hope so ... but I’m not certain. Cutter has created a character and crafted a tale that leaves one hopeful but uncertain. I find myself rooting for that character, and wishing her success ... but I’m not sure. And if she does succeed, will it be in a way that she -and the rest of us - imagine? And what of those around her, sharing her life and her quest - or seeking to bring an end to both?

I’m looking forward to answering these question when I read the third installment of Cutter’s “Seattle Trolls Trilogy.” In the meantime, I also plan to get/read the first installment of that trilogy, “The Changeling Troll.”

Also in the meantime ... our ship docks in Seattle in a few days ... and I definitely plan to keep my eyes, my ears, and my imagination open when step ashore and enter the Emerald City.
__________

NOTE: I received a free e-copy of this work through LibraryThing, in exchange for a review. ( )
  JeffMcDonald | Apr 23, 2019 |
Esta resenha foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Resenhistas do LibraryThing.
This was a pretty quirky book, but I really liked it. I felt that I could relate to the awkwardness of the main character, and felt that sometimes I was in the story. The ending was a little disappointing, I expected it to be more climatic, but I still really liked the book. I would recommend it to someone if they were looking for a light read. ( )
  M_Sawtelle | Dec 16, 2017 |
Esta resenha foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Resenhistas do LibraryThing.
3 1/2 stars

I received an early reviewer’s ecopy of this book in exchange for an honest review. (Sorry it took so long for me to finish it.)

This review contains spoilers.

I had no idea this was a sequel. I probably would not have requested it had I realized. None the less, I enjoyed this story. I was not very impressed by the first third or so of the book. I was confused. I kept thinking that it must be a sequel, but there was no point in the first pages of the book that stated what the series was, nor did it say on Goodreads or the LibraryThing giveaway that it was a sequel. It wasn’t until the end papers (if they can be called that in an ebook) that I finally found where it said it was a sequel. The part that confused me most was Christine’s and Tina’s parents. I was so confused when I was told that Christine didn’t trust Tina’s parents, and then a few pages later, that she got along well with her parents. Because Christine was adopted by Tina’s biological parents, and I was told that Tina’s parents (without mention that they were her adopted parents) had switched Tina with Christine to distract the demons. I was honestly thinking that the author had carelessly left two different versions of Christine’s relationship with her parents in the book, and I didn’t understand why, since Christine and Tina had learned of their switching, Tina didn’t come to the family dinner. I didn’t realize that whenever Tina’s parents were mentioned it was referring to her adopted parents (or, the people who stole her from her biological parents since Christine’s parents didn’t willingly part with her) and whenever it mentioned Christine’s parents it was referring to Tina’s biological parents, Christine’s adopted parents. I still don’t know why Tina doesn’t hang out with Christine’s family since they are technically her family too, and her adopted family kidnapped her from her biological parents, and should be in jail for that. The other part that confused me was Patrick the Ogre. He’s mentioned several times, but we never are told who he is, other than that he’s an ogre.

The book felt like a middle grade book at times. Not because it would be appropriate for middle grade (the content isn’t terrible, but there are references to sex and mild cussing,) but because the pacing was very fast. Almost too fast, which is how I often feel while reading middle-grade novels.

I thought it was kind of weird that Christine’s water elemental was not sentient, the fire was like a wild animal that had to be tamed, the wind was sentient and had to be bargained with, and the earth was practically another being that could have lived on its own without Christine.

I was convinced that the old troll was Christine’s grandfather. I was mildly disappointed that he was her uncle. I was also curious as to why Christine’s father was in jail because the king thought he’d kidnapped her, but the king has no heirs. I don’t remember the book saying this, but it seems as though Christine’s mother was the king’s sister? And so her father wouldn’t be an heir to the throne? I wasn’t sure.

I liked Christine a lot. I really liked Christine’s brother. I wish we would have seen more of him. I didn’t really like Joe from the moment he was mentioned. I’m glad he and Christine broke up. Christine’s parents seemed nice, but we didn’t get to know them very well. We heard a lot about Tina, but we barely saw her, so I’m still not sure how I feel about her. The wooden man (I forget his name) seemed interesting, but we didn’t get to know him very well. The demon seemed interesting. As a villain, he may have had some interesting motives, though we still don’t know what all of his motives were.

I don’t like to read books with angels as characters. They always mess up their angelology. Why couldn’t the angels be fairies or elves?

There were a few mild typos, but I assume that is because this was an early reviewer’s copy.

Because I was having so much trouble understanding the world I really didn’t get into the book until I was about a third in, and then, middle-grade-type pacing or not, the story really got interesting. I wish that the story would have concluded in this book, but I’m sure the third book will be good as well. I am sure that if you have read the first book in the series, this book will be excellent. As someone who came in to the series with this book, it was enjoyable, but mildly confusing. ( )
  ComposingComposer | Jan 31, 2017 |
Esta resenha foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Resenhistas do LibraryThing.
Ever wonder what life would be like if everything you knew to be true... wasn't? Christine was raised human - now she has learned she is a troll. And, not just any troll, but a princess troll! This book follows Christine's adventures through an alternate Seattle as she tries to reinstate her natural magic - magic most trolls would not have.

The writing is imaginative and entertaining which kept me reading. I had never heard of this series or the author prior to reading this book, but would highly recommend it to anyone looking for adventure, action, and humor. I found this to be a delightful coming-of-age story even my 13-year-old daughter would enjoy.

**I received a complimentary copy of this book via LibraryThing's Early Reviewers.** ( )
  absolutartist1 | Jan 6, 2017 |
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Most trolls have no natural magical ability. However, Christine does. Enchanted powders swirl up when she walks by. Charms glow.What happens when Christine tries to direct her magical powers?Nothing. Nada. Zip.Something blocks Christine from reaching her full magical potential.But what?"The Princess Troll"--the second novel in The Seattle Trolls trilogy and the delightful continuation "The Changeling Troll"--follows Christine on her journeys through a skewed Seattle and her encounters with outrageous and whimsical characters. A coming of age tale for all ages!

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O livro de Leah R. Cutter, The Princess Troll, estava disponível em LibraryThing Early Reviewers.

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