Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Dancing in the Streets: A History of…
Carregando...

Dancing in the Streets: A History of Collective Joy (edição: 2007)

de Barbara Ehrenreich (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
4791138,389 (3.8)16
Cultural historian Ehrenreich explores a human impulse that has been so effectively suppressed that we lack even a term for it: the desire for collective joy, historically expressed in ecstatic revels of feasting, costuming, and dancing. She uncovers the origins of communal celebration in human biology and culture. Although 16th-century Europeans viewed mass festivities as foreign and "savage," Ehrenreich shows that they were indigenous to the West, from the ancient Greeks to medieval Christianity. Ultimately, church officials drove the festivities into the streets, Protestants criminalized carnival, Wahhabist Muslims battled ecstatic Sufism, European colonizers wiped out native dance rites. The elites' fear that such gatherings would undermine social hierarchies was justified: the festive tradition inspired uprisings and revolutions from France to the Caribbean to the American plains. Yet outbreaks of group revelry persist, as Ehrenreich shows, pointing to the 1960s rock-and-roll rebellion and the more recent "carnivalization" of sports.--From publisher description.… (mais)
Membro:queertopia
Título:Dancing in the Streets: A History of Collective Joy
Autores:Barbara Ehrenreich (Autor)
Informação:Holt Paperbacks (2007), Edition: 1st, 336 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Queertopia

Detalhes da Obra

Dancing in the Streets: A History of Collective Joy de Barbara Ehrenreich

Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 16 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 11 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Ehrenreich begins with the observation that a lot of cultures worldwide seem to have collective ecstatic rituals that usually involve dance, where individuals enter a state of ecstasy that makes them lose their sense of individuality and feel a part of a collective whole. She then asks why we don't have those rituals in modern Western culture, and then traces all the reasons why we have rejected those kinds of rituals and why we dismiss them as "primitive" when we encounter them in other cultures. It more or less boils down to the fact that the kind of community created by ecstatic ritual must be small, and it doesn't scale up to the giant civilization that developed in Europe and the areas Europe colonized. Large civilizations require political hierarchies and systems of control, and thus suppress collective rituals.

This is going to sound really snobby, but I'm a historian, and anthropology makes me really squeamish and this book is a great example of why. The book starts off by comparing ecstatic rituals throughout the world and throughout history, and arguing that these rituals share some common features. But there is absolutely no discussion of the various sources from which we have learned about these rituals. Part of her argument is that when Europeans encounter these rituals in indigenous cultures, they are critical and disdainful of them, yet Ehrenreich assumes that European descriptions of the rituals are accurate. Then she traces the history of ecstatic ritual in Western culture, starting with ancient Greece and Rome and continuing to the modern day. Yet again, she takes descriptions of rituals at face value, and draws some really huge conclusions based on her analyses (or, more often, her acceptance of other historians' analyses). There is no discussion of her sources, or how she knows what she claims to know about these rituals. She is clearly not an expert in all of the times and places she examines in this book. The whole book would fall apart if just a few of her examples were wrong (and I suspect many of them are).

Ehrenreich is arguing that ecstatic ritual is a universal human tendency, and that modern European culture is unusual for repressing it.... and yet she does not talk about whether these rituals have been repressed anywhere else in the world, and how or why.

She makes a really dubious argument that the decline of ecstatic ritual can be tied to the rise in rates of depression. It's an interesting theory, but it is unproveable, even though she tries to prove it by citing rising rates in suicide as a measure of rates of depression. There are so many things wrong with this argument and the evidence she uses to support it. Just because historical records show a rise in suicide cases does not mean there was actually a rise in suicides - it could be that they were just reported more. A rise in suicide does not necessarily correlate to a rise in depression - it could be that in different times and places, suicide is a more acceptable response to depression or other problems.

The end of the book was really unsatisfying, because Ehrenreich's conclusion seems to be "well, sure is too bad we don't do this any more." She doesn't really offer any conclusions about how our society would be better or worse with ecstatic ritual, other than to suggest that people might not be so depressed. ( )
  Gwendydd | Mar 1, 2021 |
I enjoyed this. At time I got distracted - not particularly been a fan of mass sports, this is where I drifted off - but all in all a nice listen. ( )
  MissYowlYY | Jun 12, 2020 |
Really enjoyed the topic, questioned some of the conclusions. ( )
  jostie13 | May 14, 2020 |
I loved this book! It was joyous to realize that I have forgotten to dance and in so doing lost a lot of joy in my life. I have a tendency towards depression, but when I was able to dance as part of my daily exercise I got a lot of joy from it and lifted me from depression and or sorrow. I have arthritis in my knees. Ehrenreich's history of dance and its repression is enlightening. I like her comparison of how in fundamentalist religions from Christianity to Islam, in particular the Wahhabi and the Pentecostal that my maternal family practices, dance, secular music, art, and with Wahhabism, even musical instruments are banned. I remember my maternal Pentecostal grandfather condemning dance, music, and television as the "work of the devil." In my case, I think that is why my mother and I had and have depression, we were raised in an atmosphere that didn't encourage joy.

For Ehrenreich communal dance gives us joy that bonds us. Ecstatic ritual dance strengthens our empathy with one another where we are all equal. She shows how elites throughout history have attempted to suppress dance because many times under elites oppressive regimes after communal dances and rituals people have revolted. For her civilization is built on a class system. From warrior kings and priest kings to Nazi and Communist dictators have banned ecstatic dance and celebration fearing a revolt that may and has come out it. Instead they stage their own very tightly controlled and choreographed celebrations. Yet I still like what the anarchist feminist Emma Goldman was quoted as saying, "I don't want to be part of your revolution if I can't dance." ( )
1 vote Marlenealvarado | Dec 18, 2015 |
I liked this and found it an interesting read. Ehrenreich presented some historical events in an unusual light - the rise of Protestantism as a reaction against the increasing disapproval by the Catholic Church of public celebration being the main example. I was also fascinated by the idea, provocative although not well-supported, that the early Christians were shaped by Dionysian cults, because the Roman Jews were also followers of Dionysus. I'd love to see some more evidence along those lines - it's definitely not a modern article of Jewish faith.

That said, there are some substantial criticisms I could make. Looking at a couple thousand years of European history through a single narrow lens is interesting but not at all convincing - I don't believe the author thinks she's found the key to all history or anything, but the presentation is shaped that way and I found it thin. Secondly, the Eurocentrism - which she explicitly apologizes for and explains - is tedious. Certainly for someone who's more a journalist than a serious historian or anthropologist, focusing on Europe is the path of least resistance, but it's not nearly as compelling. My third big objection is that she makes very little effort to make her thesis relevant to modern life. She discusses sports, briefly, mentions Halloween literally in one offhand remark, and doesn't touch on flash mobs, the effect of the internet, modern religious or secular holidays, or anything else in the current day at all. I'd be happy to read a second book focused on that, to be honest - maybe happier than I was with this one.

To be clear, I liked and enjoyed the book, and it gave me some interesting things to think about. A work of major scholarship it is not, but it's worth a read. ( )
  JeremyPreacher | Mar 30, 2013 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 11 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês (1)

Cultural historian Ehrenreich explores a human impulse that has been so effectively suppressed that we lack even a term for it: the desire for collective joy, historically expressed in ecstatic revels of feasting, costuming, and dancing. She uncovers the origins of communal celebration in human biology and culture. Although 16th-century Europeans viewed mass festivities as foreign and "savage," Ehrenreich shows that they were indigenous to the West, from the ancient Greeks to medieval Christianity. Ultimately, church officials drove the festivities into the streets, Protestants criminalized carnival, Wahhabist Muslims battled ecstatic Sufism, European colonizers wiped out native dance rites. The elites' fear that such gatherings would undermine social hierarchies was justified: the festive tradition inspired uprisings and revolutions from France to the Caribbean to the American plains. Yet outbreaks of group revelry persist, as Ehrenreich shows, pointing to the 1960s rock-and-roll rebellion and the more recent "carnivalization" of sports.--From publisher description.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Links rápidos

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.8)
0.5
1
1.5
2 5
2.5 1
3 12
3.5 6
4 30
4.5 2
5 12

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 157,959,582 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível