Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Invisible planets : contemporary Chinese…
Carregando...

Invisible planets : contemporary Chinese science fiction in translation (edição: 2016)

de Ken Liu (Editor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
3741851,529 (4.01)4
"Thirteen intriguing visions of the future from China"--Cover."The thirteen stories in this collection...add up to a strong and diverse representation of Chinese SF. Some have won awards in translation, some have garnered serious critical acclaim, some have been selected for Year's Best anthologies, and some are simply Ken Liu's personal favorites.To round out the collection, there are several essays from Chinese scholars and authors, plus an illuminating introduction by Ken Liu."--Book jacket."Award-winning translator and author Ken Liu presents a collection of short speculative fiction from China. Some stories have won awards (including Hao Jingfang's Hugo-winning novella, Folding Beijing); some have been included in various 'Year's Best' anthologies; some have been well reviewed by critics and readers; and some are simply Ken's personal favorites. Many of the authors collected here (with the obvious exception of New York Times bestseller Liu Cixin's two stories) belong to the younger generation of 'rising stars'. In addition, three essays at the end of the book explore Chinese science fiction. Liu Cixin's essay, The Worst of All Possible Universes and The Best of All Possible Earths, gives a historical overview of SF in China and situates his own rise to prominence as the premier Chinese author within that context. Chen Qiufan's The Torn Generation gives the view of a younger generation of authors trying to come to terms with the tumultuous transformations around them. Finally, Xia Jia, who holds the first Ph.D. issued for the study of Chinese SF, asks What Makes Chinese Science Fiction Chinese?" -- Publisher's description… (mais)
Membro:eldang
Título:Invisible planets : contemporary Chinese science fiction in translation
Autores:Ken Liu
Informação:New York : Tor, 2016.
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:*****
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Detalhes da Obra

Invisible Planets: Contemporary Chinese Science Fiction in Translation de Ken Liu (Editor)

Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 4 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 18 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Not having read much, or really any Chinese science fiction before, I picked up this volume as an intro. I've at least heard of Liu Cixin, the author of the well-known Three-Body Problem trilogy; he contributes two of the thirteen short stories and one of the three ending essays, and the rest of the authors I'd never heard of are for the most part quite good as well. Like all good short story collections, the wide variety of styles, themes, and perspectives included gives you a hint of how much richer the wider world of Chinese science fiction is, while still being satisfying on its own. The translations from the Chinese by Ken Liu, noted author in his own right, preserve the distinct voices of the original authors and offer a taste of what makes them special, while flowing smoothly enough for a monolingual English-speaking reader like me. I frequently found myself reminded of particular Western science fiction stories when reading these, but I wouldn't say that they're derivative (or at least when they are, as in the 1984-homage "The City of Silence", they're quite open about it), merely that they touch on similar themes. The ending essays are very high quality as well.

The stories:

- "The Year of the Rat". The image of a bunch of college students having to fight giant genetically engineered neorats hand-to-hand with bayonets is kind of funny, especially as a commentary on the perverse effects on adulthood generated by China's slogan- and exam-heavy educational system, but the more human story here is the Enders Game-ish team dynamics between the main characters, the softhearted screwup, the sadistic bully, and so forth. I'd probably end up with PTSD as well. For many years I thought that I had been born in the Year of the Rat, but I had neglected to realize that the year starts with the lunar calendar, and therefore I am actually Year of the Pig.

- "The Fish of Lijiang". A "romantic tragedy", wherein an overworked office drone with a neurological disorder is sent on a mandatory vacation to recuperate in the resort town of Lijiang, whereupon he has a brief fling with a girl who has also been sent to the same town for a few days. The fake Disneyland aspect of the town - the guides, the fellow inhabitants, even the titular fish are all robots - only makes the inevitable end of their coincidental hookup sadder, emphasizing the lack of real choices available to most people at most times in their lives.

- "The Flower of Shazui". Aside from the mild sci-fi touches of customizable tattoos and a remote-controlled suit, this could be any one of a million noir stories about a guy falling in love with a prostitute and helping her get revenge on her no-good abusive husband/pimp.

- "A Hundred Ghosts Parade Tonight". In a city of artificial ghosts, a tourist trap that has fallen on hard times, one boy who suspects that he's the only real inhabitant is forced to witness the destruction of the city, and he tries to determine if he's alive or not by fighting the agents of destruction. All the ghosts of the town are based on traditional Chinese supernatural beings, which raises the question of the transient nature of historical appreciation, when modern society loses interest in the entertainment of the past.

- "Tongtong's Summer". A young girl's grandfather moves in with her family, and the standard Confucian ideal of filial piety towards elders is explored as the grandfather and his fellow elders learn how to use their caretaker telepresence robots to look after each other.

- "Night Journey of the Dragon-Horse". This reminded me of one of the stories in Stanislaw Lem's Cyberiad: a giant decrepit mechanical dragon-horse journeying through a post-human landscape meets a bat and they share some temporary companionship. There's a lot of poetry in this story but the actual narrative is not so strong.

- "The City of Silence". The most explicitly derivative story in the bunch, this 1984 replica, which explicitly references its ancestor numerous times, features a man trapped in a world of seemingly all-pervasive censorship until he meets a beautiful woman who's a member of a society of freethinkers. After some great group discussion and some even greater group sex, the authorities finally catch up to the group and smash their paradise, leaving the protagonist determined to escape to an imagined utopia, à la Brazil.

- "Invisible Planets". My favorite story, this one is framed as a travelogue of various planets told by a seasoned wanderer to an eager yet often skeptical listener. Each planet has some unique characteristic that reflects some interesting point about life, the universe, and everything, and it ends with a nicely meta-fictional point about the connection between reader and storyteller that reminds me of a more efficient Italo Calvino work, like Invisible Cities wrapped up in a tenth the time.

- "Folding Beijing". A somewhat heavy-handed class consciousness allegory which takes place in a future Beijing where the resources of time and space are so precious that the city is constructed that each of the three different classes can only be awake for part of the day. One man is trying to earn money to improve his daughter's lot in life by smuggling information between the different spaces, until one of his jobs gets him enmeshed in an illicit affair that threatens to bring his plan to ruin. This strongly reminded me of the film In Time.

- "Call Girl". A prostitute, but selling immersive experiences instead of straightforward sex, whose lure is so attractive that her customers sometimes decide not to return to reality. While the actual narrative of the story is pretty slight, there's some good poetic writing, and an ending that takes a little thinking.

- "Grave of the Fireflies". A melancholy fantasy story, juxtaposing the quest of the daughter of the last Queen of Men to escape the heat-death of the universe with her struggle to know her parents. I don't see any obvious parallels to the famous anime of the same name, but some of the imagery reminded me of film The Fountain.

- "The Circle". During the Warring States period, a would-be assassin begs for forgiveness by offering the King the secret to eternal life. All he needs to unlock this formula is three million soldiers to act as a giant mechanical computer to calculate the digits of pi, and the King agrees to this request even though tying up such a large portion of his army risks disaster at the hand of the other kingdoms. I really enjoyed the first of Liu's stories, which reminded me of one of the computer education scenes in Neal Stephenson's The Diamond Age, crossed with the don't-overthink-it moral of Arthur C. Clarke's short story "Superiority".

- "Taking Care of God". Another riff on Confucian filial piety, this one imagines that an advanced alien race, in its sunset years, has descended en masse to Earth in order to live out its dotage, with its members portioned out to every household on the planet. Liu explores the humor of what once was a race of world-builders ending up like every other "useless" old relative hanging around the house, like a domesticated version of Clarke's Childhood's End with a dash of the Golgafrinchan B Ark scene from Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. The cyclical ending is a nice touch as well.

The ending section features three brief essays on Chinese science fiction, which to my delight often directly contradict each other. The question of what makes Chinese science fiction distinct to China is addressed several times, with several different possible answers. Even though "what makes art from Location X uniquely X?" is the classic unanswerable riddle, when the respondent answers the real question hiding behind it - "what makes the work of you and your co-artists special?" - you can get some very interesting thoughts.

- "The Worst of All Possible Universes and the Best of All Possible Earths: Three-Body and Chinese Science Fiction". Liu Cixin discusses his now-famous trilogy, locating it in the context of Chinese literary traditions going back over a century. He makes a great if debatable point about the emptiness of the appeal of Communism to science fiction writers, which is a big contrast to the discussion of Russian literature in Richard Stites' Revolutionary Dreams:

"In the early years after the Communist Revolution, politics and revolutionary fervor infused every aspect of daily life, and the very air one breathed seemed filled with propaganda for Communist ideals. Given this context, one might have expected that science fiction would also be filled with descriptions of Communist utopias of the future. But as a matter of fact, not a single work of this type can be found. There were practically no science fiction stories that featured Communism as the subject, not even simplistic sketches to promote the concept."

- "The Torn Generation: Chinese Science Fiction in a Culture in Transition". Chen Qiufan has a good reference to the great author Lu Xun as he attempts to sum up what the government's promise of the "Chinese Dream - their own homegrown analogue of the famous American Dream - has to do with the lived experiences of Chinese struggling their way in the modern era, and how the science fiction tradition reflects their concerns:

"In 1903, another revolutionary time in Chinese history when the new was replacing the old, Lu Xun, the father of modern Chinese literature, said, 'The progress of the Chinese people begins with scientific fiction.' He saw science fiction as a tool to inspire the nation with the spirit of science and to chase away the remnants of feudal obscurantism. More than a hundred years later, the problems facing us are far more complicated and likely not amenable to scientific solutions, but I still believe that science fiction is capable of wedging open small possibilities: to mend the torn generation, to allow different visions and imagined future Chinas to coexist in peace, to listen to one another, to reach consensus, and to proceed together."

- "What Makes Chinese Science Fiction Chinese?". Xia Jia takes the obligatory stab at the question with perhaps the most informative essay of the bunch. She disagrees with Liu's essay and notes that there were actually several Communism-themed science fiction stories from back in its Mao-era heyday with stereotypically upbeat portrayals of the glorious future that Communism would create. While Chinese authors from any era have much the same concerns as authors anywhere, their expression of those ideas in science fiction is inevitably somewhat colored by China's unique place in the history of science, particularly since, unlike for most of recorded history, China is now trying to catch up to the rest of the world:

"Overall, Chinese science fiction writers are faced with a particular historic condition. On the one hand, the failure of Communism as an alternative for overcoming the crises of capitalism means that the crises of capitalist culture, accompanied by the process of globalization, are manifesting in the daily lives of the Chinese people. On the other hand, China, after a series of traumas from the economic reforms and paying a heavy price for development, has managed to take off economically and resurge globally. The simultaneous presence of crisis and prosperity guarantees a range of attitudes toward humanity's future among the writers: some are pessimistic, believing that we're powerless against irresistible trends; some are hopeful that human ingenuity will ultimately triumph; still others resort to ironic observation of the absurdities of life. The Chinese people once believed that science, technology, and the courage to dream would propel them to catch up with the developed nations of the West. However, now that Western science fiction and cultural products are filled with imaginative visions of humanity's gloomy destiny, Chinese science fiction writers and readers can no longer treat 'where are we going?' as an answered question."

Science fiction as a way of asking and answering questions - I like that. And the questions and answers coming out of China are as good as those from anywhere. ( )
  aaronarnold | May 11, 2021 |
'Invisible Planets' is an anthology of thirteen SF-stories, by various authors. As Ken Liu (editor and translator of this work) wrote in the foreword: This is a small selection of some Chinese writers' stories, not a Best Of. Some of these were previously/also published in magazines like Clarkesworld, Uncanny, Lightspeed, Apex, and others.

I won't review each story. Should you wish to read such reviews, then at least these two - well, four - should meet your demand:
Althea Ann
Tadiana Night Owl
Taryn
Charlie

The majority of the stories were much to my liking and in a way refreshing, compared to Anglo-Saxon SF. Despite similarity in themes, it was quite informative to have an Asian or Eastern point-of-view. For instance, 'The City of Silence' (Ma Boyong) is similar to Orwell's '1984', but shows clearly that China and free speech isn't exactly a successful marriage, could even get one into serious trouble. 'Tongtong’s Summer' (Xia Jia), is one where robots are used as intermediary solutions to keep the elder company and help them with specific chores: cleaning, cooking, putting them to bed, ... anything a maid or nurse would do. However, in this case, it's still a human operating the robot. Later on, this kind of robot will become a tool for the elder or those who aren't as mobile any more to help each other or meet up. Today, such robots already exist and are used in e.g. nursing homes, though perhaps not in such an advanced version.

Other stories take, for example, events and figures from China's rich history to write a new story or as a basis for an alternative, SF-influenced allegory.

The three essays (each about 8-10 pages long) complete this offering and show that in China, too, SF has to "fight" to be taken seriously, in contrast to general literature. A problem that also exists elsewhere, if not everywhere, in the world, strangely enough.
You also are informed about what makes Chinese SF Chinese (and how various elements can influence a story: a region, one's upbringing, one's view on the world, ...), how SF is used in China (to address current sociopolitical problems, to try to create a better China - better for everyone, not just the wealthy citizens, ...), and how Chinese SF tries to find its place on a global scene.

'Invisible Planets' is a very attractive and diverse, but small, selection of China's science-fiction. A selection that can help to broaden one's view, as Xia Jia writes in her essay: While Western SF looks at the problems and possible futures of man in general, Chinese SF is first and foremost about and aimed at a Chinese readership.

----------

Table of contents:
Chen Qiufan
* The Year of the Rar
* The Fish of Lijiang
* The Flower of Shazui

Xia Jia
* A Hundred Ghosts Parade Tonight
* Tongtong’s Summer
* Night Journey of the Dragon-Horse

Ma Boyong
* The City of Silence

Hao Jingfang
* Invisible Planets
* Folding Beijing (I've this one in French, in [b:Utopiales 2017|36427232|Utopiales 2017|Dominique Douay|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1508229613l/36427232._SX50_.jpg|58126781]; my review of the book and story)

Tang Fei
* Call Girl

Cheng Jingbo
* Grave of the Fireflies

Liu Cixin
* The Circle
* Taking Care of God (I read this one in Liu's [b:The Wandering Earth|32665865|The Wandering Earth|Liu Cixin|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1565183491l/32665865._SY75_.jpg|67763322]; my review of the book)

Essays
* The Worst of All Possible Universes and the Best of All Possible Earths: Three-Body and Chinese Science Fiction - Liu Cixin
* The Torn Generation: Chinese Science Fiction in a Culture in Transition - Chen Qiufan
* What Makes Chinese Science Fiction Chinese? - Xia Jia ( )
  TechThing | Jan 22, 2021 |
Ok, Star Trek has world peace, one world government, and a religious, monetary and hunger free world to boot... woo hoo!! But (and it's a bit of a big but) it doesn't happen without a third world war, massive depopulation, some very handy gadgets and a lot of help from some friendly Vulcans, who are due to pop in to oversee the transformation of human society in 2063. So, that's something to look forward to, at least. Yay!! (The Vulcany bit, not the Armageddony bit, which, tbh, is likely to be a bit of a downer.)

Hao Jingfang's "Folding Beijing", a tale of social stratification, is the best of the lot. Jingfang was able to show us it all comes down to balance, i.e., we need to keep shifting the balance as life never stops changing. The modern idea of making everybody the same is weird and contrary to nature. Celebrate the differences in all things and accept. Utopia is not a place it is an inner frame of mind, nirvana, where good and bad are all one and much depends on a point of view. For instance, to some humans eating meat is a happy experience but it is not a happy experience for the animal who has been treated horribly and slaughtered. So utopia for you is not utopia for the cow. Everything in life is an instance of this balance. The outward world is the way things are for this moment in time but the inner world can be a contrast to that, a detachment of inner peace and acceptance will change everything. The profusion of science fiction writing in China is an expression of the mastering of science and technology, its transformation into an industrial, urban society, and its rise as a new imperialist power, like the US in the 1950s, which ushered in mass science fiction. Both societies worship the idol of technology, and sometimes it seems both sets of writers from both countries lack imagination beyond the tropes of dystopian futures that regurgitate the pessimistic outlooks of a frustrated middle-class that can only imagine societies governed by the law of value, and eternal capitalism.

Roads to Utopia are difficult to find and most visions of the future, particularly Chinese, are dystopian for a reason. And that reason is us, in our ever teeming billions. ( )
  antao | Aug 20, 2020 |
A wonderful compendium encompassing a broad spectrum of sci-fi and even fantasy from Chinese authors. Too much to describe, but running the gamut from hard sci-fi and interstellar exploration to a 1984-like scenario of an ever-growing list of banned words in real-life. ( )
  goliathonline | Jul 7, 2020 |
Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC!

There were quite a few interesting stories in this volume. It isn't considered a "Best-Of" collection by a long shot, but it does happen to give us westerners a taste of modern Chinese SF in the form it has now become. I won't say that a few were breaking any molds or anything, but there are a few things to consider.

Such as? Well, SF as a whole is generally less respected in China than it is over here with one exception.

Liu Cixin is followed by the Chinese internet like a wildfire, sparking conversations and discussions across the board much to the amazement of the author. Even the engineers that had been the butt of his comments have taken up the book to rave about it. I personally loved his trilogy, the first of which won the Hugo over here. Another first, by the way.

So it's not that big a surprise that curiosity set in among us westerners, right? That's the whole purpose of this book. To give us all a chance to see what kind of glories are happening in the field over there. We even get an excerpt from Liu Cixin's [b:The Three-Body Problem|20518872|The Three-Body Problem (Remembrance of Earth’s Past, #1)|Liu Cixin|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1415428227s/20518872.jpg|25696480] and an awesome story called "Taking Care of God" (Which is both tongue-in-cheek and a serious read.)

His are my favorites.

BUT, I really shouldn't neglect mentioning the lyrical and metaphor-heavy Hard-SF tale of survival among the death of stars in Cheng Jingbo's "Grave of Fireflies" or Hao Jingfang's "Folding Beijing", a tale of social stratification meeting a crazy actual science-fictional folding of the city.

I also really enjoyed MA Boyong's "The City of Silence". It's a modern retelling of [b:1984|5470|1984|George Orwell|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1348990566s/5470.jpg|153313], but more than that, it takes the entire concept of language modification to its limits. I was told not to read it as a satire and so I didn't, and because I read it as a serious tale set in a serious way... it freaked me the hell out. Truly, what a nightmare. This one might stay with me a while. I was tempted to relegate it to the pile of similar oppressive dystopians, but no. It took several aspects and ran with it so solidly that I think it deserves plenty of accolades. :)

I totally recommend this for curious people. I even recommend it for fans of clever SF. :) ( )
  bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 18 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha

» Adicionar outros autores

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Liu, KenEditorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Chen, QiufanContribuinteautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Cheng, JingboContribuinteautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Hao, JingfangContribuinteautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Liu, CixinContribuinteautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Liu, KenTradutorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Ma, BoyongContribuinteautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Tang, FeiContribuinteautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Xia, JiaContribuinteautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
CDD/MDS canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

"Thirteen intriguing visions of the future from China"--Cover."The thirteen stories in this collection...add up to a strong and diverse representation of Chinese SF. Some have won awards in translation, some have garnered serious critical acclaim, some have been selected for Year's Best anthologies, and some are simply Ken Liu's personal favorites.To round out the collection, there are several essays from Chinese scholars and authors, plus an illuminating introduction by Ken Liu."--Book jacket."Award-winning translator and author Ken Liu presents a collection of short speculative fiction from China. Some stories have won awards (including Hao Jingfang's Hugo-winning novella, Folding Beijing); some have been included in various 'Year's Best' anthologies; some have been well reviewed by critics and readers; and some are simply Ken's personal favorites. Many of the authors collected here (with the obvious exception of New York Times bestseller Liu Cixin's two stories) belong to the younger generation of 'rising stars'. In addition, three essays at the end of the book explore Chinese science fiction. Liu Cixin's essay, The Worst of All Possible Universes and The Best of All Possible Earths, gives a historical overview of SF in China and situates his own rise to prominence as the premier Chinese author within that context. Chen Qiufan's The Torn Generation gives the view of a younger generation of authors trying to come to terms with the tumultuous transformations around them. Finally, Xia Jia, who holds the first Ph.D. issued for the study of Chinese SF, asks What Makes Chinese Science Fiction Chinese?" -- Publisher's description

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Links rápidos

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (4.01)
0.5 1
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 15
3.5 1
4 36
4.5 4
5 18

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 158,013,260 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível