Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Carregando...

Pudd'nhead Wilson (1894)

de Mark Twain

Outros autores: Veja a seção outros autores.

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
3,148504,387 (3.67)87
At the beginning of "Pudd'nhead Wilson" a young slave woman, fearing for her infant's son's life, exchanges her light-skinned child with her master's. From this rather simple premise Mark Twain fashioned one of his most entertaining, funny, yet biting novels. On its surface, "Pudd'nhead Wilson" possesses all the elements of an engrossing nineteenth-century mystery: reversed identities, a horrible crime, an eccentric detective, a suspenseful courtroom drama, and a surprising, unusual solution. Yet it is not a mystery novel. Seething with the undercurrents of antebellum southern culture, the book is a savage indictment in which the real criminal is society, and racial prejudice and slavery are the crimes. Written in 1894, "Pudd'nhead Wilson" glistens with characteristic Twain humor, with suspense, and with pointed irony: a gem among the author's later works.… (mais)
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 87 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 50 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Twain's Reward for His Longtime Followers

Young New York lawyer and fingerprint collector David Wilson comes to the fictional Antebellum town of Dawson's Landing, Missouri, where his propensity for koan-like aphorisms is misunderstood as nonsense and confers him the nickname "Pudd'nhead." He is the reader's observer of two intertwined tales of mistaken identity: One of the slave woman Roxy, who switches her Black infant son Valet de Chambre "Chambers" with his half-brother born the same day, Tom Driscoll; the other of Luigi and Angelo Capello, a set of twin visitors who claim to be noblemen in their native Florence, Italy. The novel is written for [author:https://www.librarything.com/author/twainmark">Mark Twain's "Constant Reader," as Stephen King calls them, and there are allusions to his earlier work throughout. Among others, the courtroom climax is a nod to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876(; the "switched at birth" of two young men from different social strata is straight from The Prince and the Pauper (1881); Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884) also has a slave's fear of being sold down the river as a major plot point; and like A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (1889), the novel juxtaposes European nobility with its American counterparts - in this case, the "First Families of Virginia" (FFVs). Even such travelogues as The Innocents Abroad (1869) and the observations and witticisms of his essays are referenced. It differs from his earlier novels, however, in that it is more tightly plotted. It has an ending which fully and in great detail ties up all threads and resolves all conflicts, while his more picaresque novels tend to end abruptly when he runs out of adventures to tell - Twain writes in the conclusion of Tom Sawyer he is stopping "where best he can" before Tom grows up into a man. So new readers may find the satire of The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson a bit obtuse, but those well-versed in Twain may more readily grasp the in-joke and enjoy it much more, and perhaps find a refreshing departure. ( )
  BobbyZim | May 11, 2024 |
One thing I like about Mark Twain is his theme of people being different than everything thinks they are. He explored that theme in Huckleberry Finn and The Prince and the Pauper, and also in Pudd'nhead Wilson. In PW, the title character is intelligent, but everyone thinks he's stupid (a pudd'nhead). Everyone thinks the foreign twins are wonderful, until they change and think the twins are villains. And everyone thinks they can identify a black person, until they can't.

I didn't like this book as well as some of Twain's others. It felt unfinished. The title character didn't get much airtime. It's hard to judge how effective the denouement with the fingerprinting would have been to a contemporary reader. It may have been a clever revelation, since using fingerprinting as evidence was brand new at the time. But to a modern reader, the outcome of Pudd'nhead's hobby of taking fingerprints is obvious from the beginning.

This book feels dated, where most of Twain's other works have stood the test of time. But it's still Twain. ( )
  TheGalaxyGirl | Jun 9, 2023 |
Dos niños nacen el mismo día en la misma casa en una pequeña población del viejo Sur: Chambers, hijo de la esclava Roxy, y Tom, hijo del amo Driscoll. Los dos son en apariencia blancos y casi idénticos. Aterrada ante la perspectiva de ver a Chambers `vendido río abajo`, Roxy intercambia a los niños, convirtiendo al esclavo en amo y al amo en esclavo.
  Natt90 | Jan 21, 2023 |
The court case at the end saved this story. I found this book to be very predictable with no characters that I could really latch on to, whether for good or evil. Everyone seemed to be a supporting character with no one stepping up to be a star until Pudd'nhead takes on that final case. It is a short story (139 pages) and an easy read. Entertaining, but far from exceptional. ( )
  282Mikado | Apr 13, 2022 |
I use the history tag because the book teaches a lot of history, perhaps unwittingly, and it's a fascinating look at race, slavery, and perception. It reads like a forerunner of Faulkner. Although I gave it a 4 star rating for its shape, I enjoyed it as if it were a 5 star. ( )
  LuanneCastle | Mar 5, 2022 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 50 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha

» Adicionar outros autores (93 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Twain, Markautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Budd, LouisIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Holbrook, DavidEditorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Leavis, F. R.Introduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Morris, WrightPrefácioautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Williams, Sherley AnneIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Wollebæk, PerTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Wollebæk, PerPrefácioautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Lugares importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
The scene of this chronicle is the town of Dawson's Landing, on the Missouri side of the Mississippi, half a day's journey, per steamboat, from St. Louis.

-Pudd'nhead Wilson
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Clique para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
(Clique para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Aviso de desambiguação
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
This work is the novel Pudd'nhead Wilson, a single work, originally published in the U.S. in The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson and the Comedy of Those Extraordinary Twins.

Editions that include both Pudd'nhead Wilson and Those Extraordinary Twins are a different work and should be separated.
Please keep the Norton Critical Edition books un-combined with the rest of them - it is significantly different with thorough explanatory annotations, and with additional essays and reviews by other writers. Thank you.
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico
LCC Canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

At the beginning of "Pudd'nhead Wilson" a young slave woman, fearing for her infant's son's life, exchanges her light-skinned child with her master's. From this rather simple premise Mark Twain fashioned one of his most entertaining, funny, yet biting novels. On its surface, "Pudd'nhead Wilson" possesses all the elements of an engrossing nineteenth-century mystery: reversed identities, a horrible crime, an eccentric detective, a suspenseful courtroom drama, and a surprising, unusual solution. Yet it is not a mystery novel. Seething with the undercurrents of antebellum southern culture, the book is a savage indictment in which the real criminal is society, and racial prejudice and slavery are the crimes. Written in 1894, "Pudd'nhead Wilson" glistens with characteristic Twain humor, with suspense, and with pointed irony: a gem among the author's later works.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Biblioteca Histórica: Mark Twain

Mark Twain tem uma Biblioteca Histórica. As bibliotecas históricas são bibliotecas privadas de leitores famosos introduzidas por membros do LibraryThing que integram o grupo Biblioteca Históricas.

Veja de Mark Twain o perfil histórico.

Veja de a página de autor deMark Twain.

Current Discussions

Nenhum(a)

Capas populares

Links rápidos

Avaliação

Média: (3.67)
0.5
1 10
1.5 2
2 22
2.5 7
3 114
3.5 36
4 176
4.5 12
5 68

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 208,686,622 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível