Página inicialGruposDiscussãoExplorarZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Carregando...

The Man Who Knew Too Much: Alan Turing and the Invention of the Computer (2006)

de David Leavitt

Outros autores: Veja a seção outros autores.

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
5961930,863 (3.46)14
To solve one of the great mathematical problems of his day, Alan Turing proposed an imaginary computer. Then, attempting to break a Nazi code during World War II, he successfully designed and built one, thus ensuring the Allied victory. Turing became a champion of artificial intelligence, but his work was cut short. As an openly gay man at a time when homosexuality was illegal in England, he was convicted and forced to undergo a humiliating "treatment" that may have led to his suicide.With a novelist's sensitivity, David Leavitt portrays Turing in all his humanity--his eccentricities, his brilliance, his fatal candor--and elegantly explains his work and its implications.… (mais)
  1. 00
    The Cracking Code Book de Simon Singh (themulhern)
    themulhern: The Leavitt biography might give this book some additional interest, but even more importantly this book will render much of what was muddled and unclear in Leavitt's presentation of code breaking entirely comprehensible.
  2. 00
    Cryptonomicon de Neal Stephenson (themulhern)
    themulhern: Alan Turing is a significant character in both. He is a friend of a protagonist in Cryptonomicon from his time at Princeton until his work on encryption of voice. And of course he is the subject of the biography. Many events and concepts turn up in both works. In both books, he seems a rather appealing person, someone you would like to know even though he might tire you out w/ his eccentricities.… (mais)
  3. 00
    Fall of Man in Wilmslow de David Lagercrantz (themulhern)
    themulhern: Both are Turing-lite, although one pretends to be a mystery novel.
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 14 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 19 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
"Certainly it would have been a comfort to him to imagine that Christopher Morcom's spirit, in some sense, had not just outlived his body but remained in the same "universe" as Turing."

Yeah, okay, so... damn. If anything, this book sure confirmed my deep love for Alan Turing. Because I really do. He was truly a wonderful man, and quite cool in his own weird way.

As for the book, I did feel a bit peeved that it focused so much not only on Turing's work but also the work of others within his field. I do understand why this was partly necessary but while it's interesting, it takes up most of the book in a way that introduces Turing only like, twenty pages into the book. If I purely wanted to learn about his work, I would've gone for one of his reports or any paper discussing his works. Because as much as a book about Alan Turing wouldn't be complete without it... a person is more than just their hobby/interest and Leavitt seemed to have forgotten that. I felt as if he got carried away when he realised he probably would have to explain some of the basics surrounding Turing's work... and ended up with a book partly made up by the work and research by other people. That'd be like spending half a Tolkien biography purely on examples of linguistics and the creation of complex fictional languages.

But there were a lot of glimpses that made the read more than worth it; and I certainly did get to know Turing better by the end of it. As complex as he was, he was quite beautiful and his refusal to be anyone but himself made me feel more safe in refusing to be anyone but myself too. ( )
  autisticluke | Nov 14, 2019 |
This is a game effort by a novelist to write a somewhat mathematical biography of a mathematician. The novelist is a gay novelist, and the subject was a gay mathematician; the biography argues for a strong connection between Turing's homosexuality and his mathematical research. I can't get behind this idea too strongly, but I couldn't claim that it was wrong, either.

There is an excellent quotation about Turing's attitude to a profound mathematical question: "Turing was probably in neither group. His isolation (not to mention his homosexuality) disinclined him to over identify with larger collectives." My stance is probably similar.

The initial discussion of set theory and the paradox of the set which can neither be a member of itself or a member of its complement is well-presented, but the discussion of Godel's work communicates very little. It is possible to blame Godel for this, though. His construction is a lot of work.

The first Turing machine, on page 68, doesn't work for any right-side operand other than 11 (2). That is, it gives the right answer only if the right operand is 2. It would have made more sense if it had just been a +2 machine. The machine on page 71 works as advertised. As the chapter, "The Universal Machine" winds on its way, the Turing machines become less clearly defined and the paradox is so rushed as to be incomprehensible. I longed to read a more technical discussion that would actually convince.

(Note I had fun entering the first Turing machine in https://turing9000.com, a really visually attractive Turing machine simulator. But for serious work, I would still have to go with JFLAP.)

The next chapter, "God is Slick", discusses Turing's hiatus at Princeton, where he had been sent by his advisor at Cambridge in order to pursue his work on computable numbers with Alonzo Church. At this time, Turing also dipped back into pure, rather than meta-mathematics, working on the Riemann hypothesis, but considering it in a mechanical way. This chapter is less technical, hence less frustrating.

The following chapter, "The Tender Peel", takes Turing to Bletchley Park. Again, it flounders in the technical detail, attempting some discussion but lacking the necessary precision. (The bit about Babbage's approach to the Vigeniere cipher is almost comprehensible.) But the chapter sets the stage effectively, and again leaves me wanting a more rigorous mathematical treatment. "the tender peel" is a quotation from the witch's song in the Disney film, "Sleeping Beauty". Turing takes a bite at the apple which will leave him a person of interest to the British government for the rest of his life.

In "The Electronic Athlete" Turing moves on from Bletchley Park and begins work on voice encryption and, at the National Physics Laboratory, the construction of the ACE computer. It is not really clear how much the ACE was real, and how Turing's ideas were really so different.

In "The Imitation Game" Turing moves to Manchester to work on a new machine with his former advisor, Newman. The chair of the department of neurosurgery at Manchester, Sir Geoffrey Jefferson, gives a lecture preemptively refuting machine intelligence. The talk was humorous in parts, but smug in a way that would have gone over poorly with Turing, who, like Darwin, felt that the constant, implicit assumption that humans were superior because the qualities humans ascribe to themselves are the ones that they insist are the superior qualities, was boring and ignorant. Turing publishes his eerie "Computing Machinery and Intelligence" paper in the journal "Mind". This paper takes a tender and very sympathetic attitude toward machines. He continues to try to solve a variety of problems on his new machine: calculations to disprove the Riemann hypothesis but also, by one of his colleagues, a clever hack to make it play "God Save the King".

"Price's Buoy" is the endgame. Turing is elected to the Royal Society, becomes interested in morphogenesis, is arrested and charged with "gross indecency", writes a short story about his unfortunate experience, and dies. The general consensus is suicide, although some of his friends prefer to believe that the death is accidental. The author gives one paragraph to the possibility that the government might have decided to kill him off as a security threat, or rather to the fact that this possibility didn't seem to occur to anyone who knew him at that time.

Although it does fall down on the mathematical side, not only w/ the bad Turing machine but also with a bunch of typos in the discussion of Mersenne primes, and wanders off into the weeds with some of its mathematical explanation, this book is worth the read. It presents a coherent, individual, and sympathetic view of Turing's life. ( )
  themulhern | Apr 16, 2019 |
A very insightful novel, showing clearly how Turing thought and acted, as well as what he believed. Perhaps a bit cold in the description of personality and relationships, but clear and rather moving. I enjoyed the explanation of the concepts Turing was looking into. While I don't quite have the head for it, I would definitely re read this book in an effort to understand them better. The subject of Cryptanalysis is quite difficult, but the explanations are thorough. ( )
  m_mozeleski | May 13, 2018 |
L'unico commento positivo che posso fare a questo libro ? il desiderio di leggere un'altra biografia di Turing,magari quella scritta da Hodges.Pochissimi dettagli matematici,pochissimi approfondimenti filosofici,elementi biografici presentati come voci di corridoio.Per non parlare della traduzione che in alcuni passaggi lascia veramente a desiderare. ( )
  AlessandraEtFabio | Dec 22, 2017 |
Leavitt being a novelist I expected this to be a novel, but it is a biography. Moreover, most attention goes to Turings mathematical work instead of his life. Unfortunately the author tries to link Turings homosexuality to this work which is almost always unpausible, if not ridiculous. He saves his best one for the last sentence though! Turing seems to have had a weird sense of humour that entirely escapes Leavitt. ( )
  stef7sa | Jan 5, 2017 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 19 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
sem resenhas | adicionar uma resenha

» Adicionar outros autores (6 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
David Leavittautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Powers, RichardNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Sargian, CarolinaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

Pertence à série publicada

Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Lugares importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
For Mark - friend, comrade, partner
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
In Alexander Mackendrick's 1951 Ealing comedy The Man in the White Suit, Alec Guinness plays Sidney Stratton, a dithery, even childlike chemist who creates a fabric that will never wear out or get dirty.
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Clique para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico
Canonical LCC
To solve one of the great mathematical problems of his day, Alan Turing proposed an imaginary computer. Then, attempting to break a Nazi code during World War II, he successfully designed and built one, thus ensuring the Allied victory. Turing became a champion of artificial intelligence, but his work was cut short. As an openly gay man at a time when homosexuality was illegal in England, he was convicted and forced to undergo a humiliating "treatment" that may have led to his suicide.With a novelist's sensitivity, David Leavitt portrays Turing in all his humanity--his eccentricities, his brilliance, his fatal candor--and elegantly explains his work and its implications.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Capas populares

Links rápidos

Avaliação

Média: (3.46)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 13
2.5 6
3 13
3.5 6
4 27
4.5 1
5 11

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 164,413,157 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível