Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Carregando...

Shirley Jackson: A Rather Haunted Life

de Ruth Franklin

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
3131362,989 (4.28)41
"Still known to millions only as the author of the "The Lottery," Shirley Jackson (1916-1965) remains curiously absent from the American literary canon. A genius of literary suspense, Jackson plumbed the cultural anxiety of postwar America better than anyone. Now, biographer Ruth Franklin reveals the tumultuous life and inner darkness of the author behind such classics as The Haunting of Hill House and We Have Always Lived in the Castle. Placing Jackson within an American Gothic tradition of Hawthorne and Poe, Franklin demonstrates how her unique contribution to this genre came from her focus on "domestic horror" drawn from an era hostile to women. Based on a wealth of previously undiscovered correspondence and dozens of new interviews, Shirley Jackson, with its exploration of astonishing talent shaped by a damaged childhood and a troubled marriage to literary critic Stanley Hyman, becomes the definitive biography of a generational avatar and an American literary giant."--… (mais)
Adicionado recentemente porProfBard, coltonium, gey57, GinaM19, bunnyladame
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Veja também 41 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 11 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
I picked up this biography on a whim at my library and it has reinspired my interest in Shirley Jackson. This is a solid biography of Jackson. It spans her whole life and focuses on her troubled relationships with her mother and her philandering husband. The first third of the book focused a bit too much on her husband for my taste, but then the author brings it solidly back to Jackson herself.

Franklin looks deeply at Shirley Jackson's writing - both her process and her overarching themes. She also spends a lot of time trying to decipher her mental health, which was something Jackson struggled with throughout her life. I also was interested to know that Jackson was a mother of four and did all of her writing while raising her children and supporting the family with her income. Her husband never brought in enough money for them to live on and her income was their primary source of money.

All in all, this is a decent biography of a fascinating person and writer. I'm excited to read the two remaining novels that I've not yet read in Jackson's oeuvre.

Original publication date: 2016
Author’s nationality: American
Original language: English
Length: 499 pages
Rating: 3.5 stars
Format/where I acquired the book: library book
Why I read this: on a whim ( )
  japaul22 | Nov 27, 2020 |
This detailed biography of the author of “The Lottery”, “The Haunting of Hill House”, and other classics of horror and suspense reveals a woman who struggled throughout her life to gain the approval of those she loved, and to function within the strictures imposed on American women in the mid 20th century.

Franklin paints with a broad brush here, covering American society, the world of academia, the publishing business, and the first stirrings of the feminist movement, returning frequently to Jackson’s fiction as reflective of all those influences. Jackson’s heroines, almost always cut off from society or repressed by their own insecurities, struggle to break free to genuine lives, and presage in many ways the concepts introduced by Betty Friedan in “The Feminine Mystique”.

Jackson herself was torn between wanting to write and gaining the approval of a difficult and demanding husband, and providing the support and love to her children that she had always sought, but never received, from her own mother. Her life was almost emblematic of the struggles Friedan discussed in her writings.

An ungainly young woman, Jackson never approached the ideals of beauty her own mother held dear. As she matured, she paid less and less attention to her appearance – a failing her mother never learned to accept. Instead, she turned her energies and her imagination to the characters and situations she created, peeling back facades to reveal the evil and darkness lurking beneath the surface. Her characters are frequently mad, or clinging to sanity by the merest thread. Yet, surprisingly, two of her best selling books chronicled her family life. “Life Among the Savages” and “Raising Demons” were light-hearted looks at rearing children, predating Jean Kerr’s “Please Don’t Eat the Daisies” and Erma Bombeck’s many domestic comedies by several years.

Casual fans familiar only with Jackson’s best-known works will discover the breadth of her collected works; scholars may learn much about the enigmatic and troubled author. ( )
  LyndaInOregon | Feb 24, 2020 |
One of the best biographies ever, about a writer of massive talent who died without even being near the peak of her powers. The author is achingly familiar with Jackson's handicaps and hardships - horribly judgmental parents to which she was tied tightly, emotionally and financially; husband Stanley Hyman, the acclaimed academic, critic, and hound; constant financial struggles; agoraphobia. None of those prevented her from writing her chilling masterpieces - The Haunting of Hill House, We Have Always Lived in the Castle, and of course, the forever famous short story The Lottery. But Jackson was also a chronicler of family life with four children and a husband who could also be counted in their number - Demon in the House and Life Among the Savages. Her short stories, published in every major magazine of the 1950s - 1960s, including The New Yorker, were eagerly devoured by many fans who still couldn't quite get how she could write beautifully of both the macabre and the mundane. Access to Jackson's plentiful correspondence and the author's obvious sympathy and admiration give the reader an unforgettable opportunity to really KNOW a fascinating stranger.

Quotes: "I would not drop dead from the lack of you/my cat has more brains than the pack of you." ( )
  froxgirl | Jan 16, 2020 |
[bc:Shirley Jackson: A Rather Haunted Life|28789677|Shirley Jackson A Rather Haunted Life|Ruth Franklin|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1470421230s/28789677.jpg|48998570]

This is a well-researched biography on Shirley Jackson, one of my favorite writers. I found the early pages hard to get through as Franklin focused too long and too deeply on Jackson's forebears, but once Shirley took center stage, I was captivated. Franklin not only brings Shirley Jackson to life, but her times as well.

Shirley wrote during the repressive 1950s, when housewife June Cleaver was the womanly ideal. Raised by a cold mother who bought into the whole June Cleaver thing, Shirley internalized and struggled against the societal norms that dictated her life, which probably explains why houses figured so prominently in her fiction.

Most people know Jackson as the writer of maybe the most notorious short story in American literature--The Lottery--and to this day, The Haunting of Hill House is still one hell of a scary read! However, she also penned two comic memoirs of motherhood in the 1950s: Life Among the Savages and Raising Demons. Although marketed as light reading, there is an edge in these books, a lack of sentimentality that is the hallmark of truth. To me, these books are the other side of Hill House--only this woman had not yet be made mad by the house she kept, though give her a few years.

Shirley Jackson was at the height of her powers when a massive heart attack felled her at the age of 45. Most of the obits identified her as a horror writer, which automatically lowered her stock, but she is a writer worthy of remembrance. ( )
  darylanderson | Apr 25, 2018 |
5544. Shirley Jackson A Rather Haunted Life, by Ruth Franklin (read 21 Mar 2018) (National Book Critics Circle biography award for 2016) I have only read three of Shirley Jackson's books--Hangsaman, read 31 Aug 1952,, We Have Always Lived in the Castle, read 5 Jan 1963, and The Haunting of Hill House, read 26 Nov 2001. But I read this biography because it won the National Book Critics Circle biography award for 2016. it is the 14th such winner I have read. The book tells well the sometimes difficult life that Shirley Jackson had (born 14 Dec 1916 in Sab Francisco, died 8 Aug 1965 in North Bennington, Vt.) and discusses all her books and mentions many of the over 200 short stories she wrote. She and her not too admirable husband had four children and had money troubles till Shirley became famous. But a life of an author who pays little attention to anything but her writing and her family is not excessively interesting. Her relation with her mother was not an easy one, and her husband had faults, especially in being faithful to his marriage vow. I found the book well worth reading and believe I will read some more of Jackson's work as a result of reading this. The text of the book is 499 pages, and it has notes and an index which bring the book up to 624 pages--so the book is not as big as one might think when seeing it is listed as a 624 page book. ( )
1 vote Schmerguls | Mar 22, 2018 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 11 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Franklin astutely explores Jackson's artistry, particularly in her deceptively subtle stories. She also sees a bigger, more original picture of Jackson as the author of “the secret history of American women of her era”—postwar, pre-feminist women who, like her, were faced with limited choices and trapped in bigoted, cliquish neighborhoods.... A consistently interesting biography that deftly captures the many selves and multiple struggles of a true American original.
adicionado por Lemeritus | editarKirkus Review (May 25, 2016)
 
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Lugares importantes
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
It shall be yours to penetrate, the deep mystery of sin, the fountains of all wicked arts, and which inexhaustibly supplies more evil impulses than human power...can make manifest in deeds. -Nathaniel Hawthorne, "Young Goodman Brown"
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Shirley Jackson often said that the idea for "The Lottery," the short story that shocked much of America when it appeared in The New Yorker on June 26, 1948, came to her while she was out doing errands one sunny June morning.
Citações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
In "The Third Baby's the Easiest," a magazine piece that was incorporated into her memoir Life Among the Savages, a clerk asks Jackson, as she arrives at the hospital to give birth to her third child, to state her occupation. "Writer," she says. "I'll just put down housewife." the clerk replies. Jackson set down these lines without rancor in a laugh-out-loud account of labor and delivery. But they vividly illustrate how great was the pressure on women of that era to assume without protest the "happy homemaker" role. --Introduction, A Secret History
Writing to a boyfriend in 1956, college student Sylvia Plath imagine a life with "babies and bed and brilliant friends and a magnificent stimulating home where geniuses drink gin in the kitchen after a delectable dinner and read their own novels." Anne Sexton opened her poem "Housewife (1962) with the line "Some women marry houses." --Introduction, A Secret History
[Describing Jackson's mother] "I don't think Geraldine was malevolent," recalls Barry Hyman, Jackson's youngest child. " She was just a deeply conventional woman who was horrified by the idea that her daughter was not going to be deeply convention." --Chapter 1, Foundations
Jackson once said that "the first book is the book you have to write to get back at your parents. Once you get that out of your way, you can start writing books." --Chapter 1, Foundations
"Natalie saw now that if she had kept the wishing stone until the right time came, she could have used it to wish for a bicycle on that Christmas Eve when a bicycle was so obviously awaiting her under the Christmas tree. Then, magic would have been sustained, and cause and effect not violated for that first, irrecoverable time. . . . Mustn’t violate the sacred rules of magic. . . . Never wish for anything until it’s ready for you.”
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Clique para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
CDD/MDS canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

"Still known to millions only as the author of the "The Lottery," Shirley Jackson (1916-1965) remains curiously absent from the American literary canon. A genius of literary suspense, Jackson plumbed the cultural anxiety of postwar America better than anyone. Now, biographer Ruth Franklin reveals the tumultuous life and inner darkness of the author behind such classics as The Haunting of Hill House and We Have Always Lived in the Castle. Placing Jackson within an American Gothic tradition of Hawthorne and Poe, Franklin demonstrates how her unique contribution to this genre came from her focus on "domestic horror" drawn from an era hostile to women. Based on a wealth of previously undiscovered correspondence and dozens of new interviews, Shirley Jackson, with its exploration of astonishing talent shaped by a damaged childhood and a troubled marriage to literary critic Stanley Hyman, becomes the definitive biography of a generational avatar and an American literary giant."--

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Links rápidos

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (4.28)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 4
3.5 2
4 17
4.5 1
5 19

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 157,690,073 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível