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Lincoln in the Bardo de George Saunders
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Lincoln in the Bardo (original: 2017; edição: 2017)

de George Saunders

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
4,4332892,004 (3.97)421
February 1862. The Civil War is less than one year old. The fighting has begun in earnest, and the nation has begun to realize it is in for a long, bloody struggle. Meanwhile, President Lincoln's beloved eleven-year-old son, Willie, lies upstairs in the White House, gravely ill. In a matter of days, despite predictions of a recovery, Willie dies and is laid to rest in a Georgetown cemetery. Newspapers report that a grief-stricken Lincoln returned to the crypt several times alone to hold his boy's body. Willie Lincoln finds himself in a strange purgatory, where ghosts mingle, gripe, commiserate, quarrel, and enact bizarre acts of penance. Within this transitional state, called, in the Tibetan tradition, the bardo, a monumental struggle erupts over young Willie's soul.… (mais)
Membro:pageturner680
Título:Lincoln in the Bardo
Autores:George Saunders
Informação:Random House Audio, Audible Audio
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:audiobook, melbourne-libraries

Work Information

Lincoln no Limbo de George Saunders (2017)

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Mostrando 1-5 de 289 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Saunders is never easy, but we don't want him to be; we want him to open our eyes to absurdities and transcendent beauty. In Lincoln, he shows us how it feels to be human despite the absolute inevitability, and absurdity, of death.

How wrong it feels to lose the spark of life to -- what? to an afterlife? to an endless brilliant One-ness with all things? What possible reason could there be to leave this beautiful world, and how can one lose a child, a lover, a parent, to the finality of death without going a little mad?
  FinallyJones | Nov 17, 2021 |
Lincoln in the Bardo has so many elements that I love - deep historical research, a creative writing style, humor, a supernatural setting, a bit of Buddhism, and a reflection of the humanism of a president I've always admired. I was blown away by how Saunders painted a picture of life in the 19th century, tugged on the old heartstrings, and touched on the profound.

Quotes:
On suffering, and compassion:
“His mind was freshly inclined towards sorrow; toward the fact that the world was full of sorrow; that everyone labored under some burden of sorrow; that all were suffering; that whatever way one took in this world, one must try to remember that all were suffering (none content; all wronged, neglected, overlooked, misunderstood), and therefore one must do what one could to lighten the load of those with whom one came into contact; that his current state of sorrow was not uniquely his; not at all, but rather, its like had been felt, would yet be felt, by scores of others, in all times, in every time, and must not be prolonged or exaggerated, because, in this state, he could be of no help to anyone…”

On Lincoln’s reason for compelling the Confederates into remaining in the Union; it reminded me of his Gettysburg Address. Without a doubt the South seceded for no other reason that slavery, and Lincoln’s response, to go to war, was motivated by keeping the Union together, and I thought this articulated his view of the bigger picture well:
“Across the sea fat kings watched and were gleeful, that something begun so well had now gone off the rails (as down South similar kings watched), and if it went off the rails, so went the whole kit, forever, and if someone ever thought to start it up again, well, it would be said (and said truly): The rabble cannot manage itself.” ( )
2 vote gbill | Nov 10, 2021 |
An Unconventional View of Love and Loss

Let’s begin with what you really want to know about the critically praised Lincoln in the Bardo: will you like it? The answer is, Maybe. If you’re in the mood for something different, especially for historical fiction (though this really isn’t exactly a historical novel), if you like the portrait of a man and his son’s relationship, not to mention an era, painted as a jumbling of sad, funny, and horrific vignettes, then you may be the reader for this book. If not, you may want to move on to something else.

George Saunders takes readers back to the American Civil War, to the personal pain suffered by Lincoln grieving over the death of his cherished little boy, Willie (William Wallace, the third son of the Lincolns) to render an impression of the president, the times, and to a larger extent the foibles, follies, conceits, blindness, and prejudices of humankind in general. Lincoln and Willie serve as a beacon of hope as they illustrate the strength needed to love completely and the power of such a love to inspire and free even a cast of transitional spirits as motley as these of their delusions and fears.

These acts of acceptance and transformation transpire during one evening in Georgetown’s Oak Hill Cemetery. Here readers encounter a collection of spirits in sort of an anteroom to heaven or hell, the bardo, like the Tibetan way station on the journey to the next earthly life, or perhaps a Catholic purgatory, where you do penance before entry into heaven.

As a reader, you will have guides, three men well versed in the rules governing the bardo and the occupants of the Oak Hill station. And quite a trio they are: Hans Vollman, who spends his time nude with an of varying massiveness; Roger Bevins III, a gay suicide over unrequited love, who sprouts multiple eyes and appendages; and the Reverend Everly Thomas, who saw his fate, fled it, and wanders wondering how he erred during his self-proclaimed exemplary life. These three first meet Willie and then Lincoln and are struck and moved by the affection of father for son and versa. And when, so taken with the two, they fear Willie will resist leaving — as most always the very young, the innocent souls — depart quickly, to be near his father, and then face all the disappointment sure to follow.

While an interesting experimental approach and often illuminating (for instance, showing the compassion of Lincoln for those on both sides who have to be sacrificed for the preservation of an ideal), it may not be quite the grand reading experience many expect. You may wish to read excerpts before committing to the book. ( )
  write-review | Nov 4, 2021 |
An Unconventional View of Love and Loss

Let’s begin with what you really want to know about the critically praised Lincoln in the Bardo: will you like it? The answer is, Maybe. If you’re in the mood for something different, especially for historical fiction (though this really isn’t exactly a historical novel), if you like the portrait of a man and his son’s relationship, not to mention an era, painted as a jumbling of sad, funny, and horrific vignettes, then you may be the reader for this book. If not, you may want to move on to something else.

George Saunders takes readers back to the American Civil War, to the personal pain suffered by Lincoln grieving over the death of his cherished little boy, Willie (William Wallace, the third son of the Lincolns) to render an impression of the president, the times, and to a larger extent the foibles, follies, conceits, blindness, and prejudices of humankind in general. Lincoln and Willie serve as a beacon of hope as they illustrate the strength needed to love completely and the power of such a love to inspire and free even a cast of transitional spirits as motley as these of their delusions and fears.

These acts of acceptance and transformation transpire during one evening in Georgetown’s Oak Hill Cemetery. Here readers encounter a collection of spirits in sort of an anteroom to heaven or hell, the bardo, like the Tibetan way station on the journey to the next earthly life, or perhaps a Catholic purgatory, where you do penance before entry into heaven.

As a reader, you will have guides, three men well versed in the rules governing the bardo and the occupants of the Oak Hill station. And quite a trio they are: Hans Vollman, who spends his time nude with an of varying massiveness; Roger Bevins III, a gay suicide over unrequited love, who sprouts multiple eyes and appendages; and the Reverend Everly Thomas, who saw his fate, fled it, and wanders wondering how he erred during his self-proclaimed exemplary life. These three first meet Willie and then Lincoln and are struck and moved by the affection of father for son and versa. And when, so taken with the two, they fear Willie will resist leaving — as most always the very young, the innocent souls — depart quickly, to be near his father, and then face all the disappointment sure to follow.

While an interesting experimental approach and often illuminating (for instance, showing the compassion of Lincoln for those on both sides who have to be sacrificed for the preservation of an ideal), it may not be quite the grand reading experience many expect. You may wish to read excerpts before committing to the book. ( )
  write-review | Nov 4, 2021 |
Congratulations to the author for the ManBooker Prize.

Although I liked this book very much it did keep reminding me of Neil Gaiman's "The Graveyard Book"
Just to find out if I was the only one who thought so I went googling. Here's a link to a short critical article from someone else who liked the book and drew parallels to Gaiman and several others.
http://www.scotsman.com/lifestyle/culture/books/book-review-lincoln-in-the-bardo...

( )
  Phil-James | Oct 1, 2021 |
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Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Saunders, Georgeautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Offerman, NickNarradorautor principalalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Sedaris, DavidNarradorautor principalalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Bachman, Barbara MDesignerautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Brownstein, CarrieNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Cardinal, ChelseaDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Cheadle, DonNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Dennings, KatNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Dughet, HaspardArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Dunham, LenaNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Hader, BillNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
July, Miranda Narradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Karr, MaryNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Pye, JohnArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Stiller, BenNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Webb, E.Artista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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February 1862. The Civil War is less than one year old. The fighting has begun in earnest, and the nation has begun to realize it is in for a long, bloody struggle. Meanwhile, President Lincoln's beloved eleven-year-old son, Willie, lies upstairs in the White House, gravely ill. In a matter of days, despite predictions of a recovery, Willie dies and is laid to rest in a Georgetown cemetery. Newspapers report that a grief-stricken Lincoln returned to the crypt several times alone to hold his boy's body. Willie Lincoln finds himself in a strange purgatory, where ghosts mingle, gripe, commiserate, quarrel, and enact bizarre acts of penance. Within this transitional state, called, in the Tibetan tradition, the bardo, a monumental struggle erupts over young Willie's soul.

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