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Unseen City: The Majesty of Pigeons, the…
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Unseen City: The Majesty of Pigeons, the Discreet Charm of Snails & Other… (original: 2016; edição: 2016)

de Nathanael Johnson (Autor)

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1616134,571 (3.86)9
It all started with Nathanael Johnson's decision to teach his daughter the name of every tree they passed on their walk to day care in San Francisco. This project turned into a quest to discover the secrets of the neighborhood's flora and fauna, and yielded more than names and trivia: Johnson developed a relationship with his nonhuman neighbors. Johnson argues that learning to see the world afresh, like a child, shifts the way we think about nature: Instead of something distant and abstract, nature becomes real--all at once comical, annoying, and beautiful. This shift can add tremendous value to our lives, and it might just be the first step in saving the world. No matter where we live--city, country, oceanside, or mountains--there are wonders that we walk past every day. Unseen City widens the pinhole of our perspective by allowing us to view the world from the high-altitude eyes of a turkey vulture and the distinctly low-altitude eyes of a snail. The narrative allows us to eavesdrop on the comically frenetic life of a squirrel and peer deep into the past with a ginkgo biloba tree. Each of these organisms has something unique to tell us about our neighborhoods and, chapter by chapter, Unseen City takes us on a journey that is part nature lesson and part love letter to the world's urban jungles. With the right perspective, a walk to the subway can be every bit as entrancing as a walk through a national park.… (mais)
Membro:ovevs
Título:Unseen City: The Majesty of Pigeons, the Discreet Charm of Snails & Other Wonders of the Urban Wilderness
Autores:Nathanael Johnson (Autor)
Informação:Rodale Books (2016), Edition: First Edition, 256 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
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Unseen City: The Majesty of Pigeons, the Discreet Charm of Snails & Other Wonders of the Urban Wilderness de Nathanael Johnson (2016)

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Mostrando 1-5 de 6 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
The introduction to this book is a real peach of an essay. In it the author lays out exactly what he plans to do in the book. He is NOT doing a guidebook. He maintains that most humans do not learn by memorizing a guidebook. They learn by trying to solve a mystery or problem. Instead of providing a guidebook he is going to "start with the unknown in these essays ... the puzzles that bewildered me ... I was more interested in going deep than going wide." The focus of the book are those plants and animals that live with humans. They are not the exotic ones but the plain everyday plants and animals that we see all the time in cities everywhere. In doing so the author elevates the mundane and implores all of us, city dwellers, greenies, gardeners, and walkers to take notice of the wildlife that surrounds us. He asks us to wonder, question, and investigate. That is a tall order, but he maintains we will all be the richer for it. ( )
  benitastrnad | Sep 16, 2021 |
Very interesting. ( )
  maryzee | Sep 2, 2020 |
I enjoyed this book a great deal. No matter where we live, there are wonders that we walk past every day. Unseen City widens our perspective by allowing us to view the world from the high-altitude eyes of a turkey vulture and the distinctly low-altitude eyes of a snail. The blurb describes the book fairly accurately so there isn't much to write in that department. However, all the additional little tidbits about city animals (crows, squirrels, snails, ants etc) was interesting and provides a new perspective on nature and our immediate environment. The writing is beautiful and the personal anecdotes don't detract (they add) to the experience of the book.

This isn't a popular science book as such, this is a get in touch with the world around you and see what is really there type of book. While this book isn't meant for children, I think parents with young children could benefit from reading it and exploring the world (garden/suburb/city) with their children the way the author has with his daughter.



( )
  ElentarriLT | Mar 24, 2020 |
When the author’s daughter first learned to talk, she would ask him about the world around them when they went on walks. “What’s this? What’s that?” Johnson realized he didn’t know much more than “This is a tree” or “That is a bird”, and so he set out on a quest to learn about the nature surrounding their urban home in San Francisco. He focused on things that residents tend to overlook as they bustle from place to place such as pigeons, snails, weeds, ginkgoes, and vultures.

A good book to whet your appetite for learning more about the world around us, but nothing close to an actual guide to urban wildlife. There was a good selection of plants and animals, and I learned interesting facts about all of them. But a lot of these things I already knew, as someone who was already interested in examining the world around me. While I understand that his daughter’s curiosity was Johnson’s gateway to his own curiosity, I think the parenting aspect of the book was played up too much. This book is interesting enough if you’d like to get started learning about urban wildlife (and it has an extensive bibliography!), but please don’t wait until you have a child to pay attention to nature! ( )
  norabelle414 | Sep 7, 2017 |
Amazon: "It all started with Nathanael Johnson’s decision to teach his daughter the name of every tree they passed on their walk to day care in San Francisco. This project turned into a quest to discover the secrets of the neighborhood’s flora and fauna, and yielded more than names and trivia: Johnson developed a relationship with his nonhuman neighbors.

Johnson argues that learning to see the world afresh, like a child, shifts the way we think about nature: Instead of something distant and abstract, nature becomes real―all at once comical, annoying, and beautiful. This shift can add tremendous value to our lives, and it might just be the first step in saving the world.

No matter where we live―city, country, oceanside, ormountains―there are wonders that we walk past every day. Unseen City widens the pinhole of our perspective by allowing us to view the world from the high-altitude eyes of a turkey vulture and the distinctly low-altitude eyes of a snail. The narrative allows us to eavesdrop on the comically frenetic life of a squirrel and peer deep into the past with a ginkgo biloba tree. Each of these organisms has something unique to tell us about our neighborhoods and, chapter by chapter, Unseen City takes us on a journey that is part nature lesson and part love letter to the world’s urban jungles. With the right perspective, a walk to the subway can be every bit as entrancing as a walk through a national park." ( )
Esta crítica foi marcada por vários usuários como um abuso ods termos de uso e não será mais exibida (exibir).
  clifforddham | Apr 19, 2016 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 6 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Author and amateur naturalist Nathanael Johnson began digging into some of these everyday urban species, leading him to write Unseen City: The Majesty of Pigeons, the Discreet Charm of Snails & Other Wonders of the Urban Wilderness. The book uncovers weeds that are tastier than you imagined and small mammals smarter than you suspected. The author researched various plants and animals, including that most infamous species of urban bird so many people love to hate, sometimes referred to as a “flying rat.”
adicionado por timtom | editar99% Invisible, Roman Mars (Apr 26, 2016)
 

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Nathanael Johnsonautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Angstadt, CarolDesignerautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Christoph, JameyArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Harte, MeridethDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Vickers, PaigeIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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It all started with Nathanael Johnson's decision to teach his daughter the name of every tree they passed on their walk to day care in San Francisco. This project turned into a quest to discover the secrets of the neighborhood's flora and fauna, and yielded more than names and trivia: Johnson developed a relationship with his nonhuman neighbors. Johnson argues that learning to see the world afresh, like a child, shifts the way we think about nature: Instead of something distant and abstract, nature becomes real--all at once comical, annoying, and beautiful. This shift can add tremendous value to our lives, and it might just be the first step in saving the world. No matter where we live--city, country, oceanside, or mountains--there are wonders that we walk past every day. Unseen City widens the pinhole of our perspective by allowing us to view the world from the high-altitude eyes of a turkey vulture and the distinctly low-altitude eyes of a snail. The narrative allows us to eavesdrop on the comically frenetic life of a squirrel and peer deep into the past with a ginkgo biloba tree. Each of these organisms has something unique to tell us about our neighborhoods and, chapter by chapter, Unseen City takes us on a journey that is part nature lesson and part love letter to the world's urban jungles. With the right perspective, a walk to the subway can be every bit as entrancing as a walk through a national park.

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