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Moonglow (2016)

de Michael Chabon

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MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaConversas / Menções
2,185877,364 (3.89)1 / 228
A man bears witness to his grandfather's deathbed confessions, which reveal his family's long-buried history and his involvement in a mail-order novelty company, World War II, and the space program.
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    The Way the Crow Flies de Ann-Marie MacDonald (rab1953)
    rab1953: Another brilliant exploration of the American moon program through personal family stories
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» Veja também 228 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 86 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
I've always been attracted to stories that are fundamentally about mostly ordinary people and their lives. Michael Chabon's Moonglow, based in part on the actual recollections of his great uncle, is exactly that kind of story. It's semi-autobiographical in form as well as function: the main character is a professional writer named Michael Chabon. In the book, Michael is spending time with his dying grandfather while he tells him the story of his life, which took him from the Jewish neighborhoods of Pittsburgh, to a military academy, to Nazi engineer-hunting in Europe, back to the US, to prison, and eventually to a Florida retirement community, where his life finally ended.

But the real main event of his life was his marriage to a beautiful French concentration camp survivor. By the time they met, she'd already had Michael's mother, then just a small girl, who he raised as his own. That isn't all that she brought into the marriage, though...she also brought mental instability, haunted by periodic breaks with reality in which she was haunted by a being she called the Skinless Horse. Presented with the opportunity to learn the truth about her life after a bout of hospitalization, Michael's grandfather chooses to not, and instead goes on loving his wife the way he's always known her until her premature death.

As might be expected from a book called Moonglow, the moon is a constant reference point and plays a dominant symbolic role. For Michael's grandfather, obsessed with rockets, it has a traditionally masculine meaning: he wants to explore and conquer it. But the moon is tied throughout history to the feminine, from Greece's Artemis to China's Chang'e. It's also tied to madness, like that which haunts Michael's grandmother. Like the fortunes of both parts of our central couple, it constantly waxes and wanes.

This was my first experience with Chabon, a writer I'd heard great things about, and this was a wonderful introduction to him. He created characters that felt real, especially with the grandma and grandpa (the modern-day characters who frame the story, though, Michael and his mother, feel a bit underdeveloped) and created a relationship that felt honest and lived-in. That these two would come together and stay together and have the impact on each other that they did made sense. I've always been a fan of the character-driven story, and this is exactly that. But there's a decent amount of plot in there for those who prefer that, and I enjoyed the way Chabon developed his story. It's a small detail, but I especially liked the way he left Augenbaugh's lighter unresolved. Tying everything up with a nice little bow isn't how life works, closure doesn't always happen, and I liked that he left that little mystery hanging. I'll definitely be reading more of his work, and would highly recommend this book. ( )
  ghneumann | Jun 14, 2024 |
Michael Chabon often admits to using his life and family in his novels, and this is definitely no exception. The narrator, 'Mike', is a writer who is listening to his dying grandfather relate his life, something he never would do before. The stories, of his childhood, experience in World War II, his wife, his work, and all the dramatic incidents therein are told in what seems like no particular order, but ultimately the reader can see how one story relates to another. Chabon is a wonderful storyteller, and his characters are people I wish I could know. The narration is terrific. ( )
  ffortsa | May 8, 2024 |
I liked 'The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay', but this was not my cup of tea. In general, the writing was good and the premise was interesting, but the characters were more sad than interesting. I did find the continual use of footnotes to be quite distracting. Not sure why some of the text was included as footnotes, it is not like it was not part of the main narrative.

The fact that this was a work of fiction somewhat raised the bar on what I expected from a story. This felt artificially disjointed and I had a hard time caring about any of the characters except the narrator. I reached a point where I felt like this was not what I wanted to be thinking about so I put it aside. ( )
  RuthInman123 | Mar 12, 2024 |
Stop me, oh oh oh, stop me, stop me if you think that you've heard this one before - an old man on his deathbed tells the story of his life in time hopping fragments. His mad wife tormented by the Skinless Horse was more interesting to me, with the huge deception buried in her past - Oh, who said she lied, because she never, she never, who said she'd lied because she never? ( )
  lelandleslie | Feb 24, 2024 |
3.5, some parts beautiful, some contrived. There was a lot that reminded me of my own family story, and perhaps that is also why I feel reserved in my praise for the book. ( )
  Jeanne.Laure | Oct 3, 2023 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 86 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
This is a novel that, despite its chronological lurches, feels entirely sure footed, propulsive, the work of a master at his very best. The brilliance of Moonglow stands as a strident defence of the form itself, a bravura demonstration of the endless mutability and versatility of the novel.
adicionado por melmore | editarThe Guardian (UK), Alex Preston (Jan 10, 2017)
 
One can read Chabon’s novel as an exploration of anger—a study of how one man’s innate rage is exacerbated by the horrors of the twentieth century and by their impact on his personal history.
adicionado por melmore | editarNew York Review of Books, Francine Prose (Web site pago) (Dec 22, 2016)
 
“Moonglow” is another scale model of love and death and catastrophe. It’s another reminder that we live in a broken world. And fiction, Chabon said, “is an attempt to mend it.”
adicionado por melmore | editarThe New Yorker, Cody Delistraty (Nov 20, 2016)
 
And this book, a love letter to two temperamentally opposite grandparents — one a rational, practical American, the other a dreamy, romantic European — is also an account of their formative influences on the writer their grandson would become.

These are not so much explained as felt, woven into the very fabric of Chabon’s supple and resourceful prose. He brings the world of his grandparents to life in language that seems to partake of their essences.
adicionado por melmore | editarNew York Times, A. O. Scott (Nov 18, 2016)
 

» Adicionar outros autores (6 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Chabon, Michaelautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Martinez, AdalisDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Newbern, GeorgeNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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A man bears witness to his grandfather's deathbed confessions, which reveal his family's long-buried history and his involvement in a mail-order novelty company, World War II, and the space program.

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