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The Hatred of Poetry de Ben Lerner
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The Hatred of Poetry (original: 2016; edição: 2016)

de Ben Lerner (Autor)

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204899,573 (3.64)7
"No art has been denounced as often as poetry. It's even bemoaned by poets: "I, too, dislike it," wrote Marianne Moore. "Many more people agree they hate poetry," Ben Lerner writes, "than can agree what poetry is. I, too, dislike it and have largely organized my life around it and do not experience that as a contradiction because poetry and the hatred of poetry are inextricable in ways it is my purpose to explore."In this inventive and lucid essay, Lerner takes the hatred of poetry as the starting point of his defense of the art. He examines poetry's greatest haters (beginning with Plato's famous claim that an ideal city had no place for poets, who would only corrupt and mislead the young) and both its greatest and worst practitioners, providing inspired close readings of Keats, Dickinson, McGonagall, Whitman, and others. Throughout, he attempts to explain the noble failure at the heart of every truly great and truly horrible poem: the impulse to launch the experience of an individual into a timeless communal existence. In The Hatred of Poetry, Lerner has crafted an entertaining, personal, and entirely original examination of a vocation no less essential for being impossible"-- "The novelist and poet Ben Lerner argues that our hatred of poetry is ultimately a sign of its nagging relevance"--… (mais)
Membro:RAD66
Título:The Hatred of Poetry
Autores:Ben Lerner (Autor)
Informação:FSG Originals (2016), Edition: First Edition, 96 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:*****
Etiquetas:literary-theory, own, poetry

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The hatred of poetry de Ben Lerner (2016)

Adicionado recentemente porbiblioteca privada, maxmanga, adornian, sadierose, kylehammer, AlainCipit, RAD66, RODNEYP, fiercebunny, eloavox

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I enjoyed spending time with Ben Lerner's prose and I enjoyed getting to know his thoughts and even when he went off on a path where I didn't want to follow, I did follow, and was rewarded.

Even so this was so cussingly not the book I wanted to read. I don't hate poetry. So I guess I should have known this wasn't exactly my book. In fact I love poetry, whenever I discipline myself enough to read it. Even so I approach poetry the way a lot of people approach music, where they just listen to Death Metal or Mozart or Country Western or Blues or whatever and they never wish to try anything else. Poetry wise, I keep going back to Rilke or the German Expressionists. Also I really love re-reading Dover Beach and no one can talk me out of it--it makes me cry every time. I like Yeats and D.H. Lawrence. I tend to flounder otherwise. And modern American poetry just feels like a hermeneutically sealed box and I can't get it to open and I don't even know where to start. I felt like Lerner is in something of the same boat, vs. being the person who could help me enjoy poetry more than I do. ( )
  poingu | Feb 22, 2020 |
Ben Lerner's brilliant essay on Poetry is, in itself, a work of art in the category of criticism. ( )
  AntonioPaola | Jan 27, 2018 |
The last ten pages were the best. ( )
  knmacneil | Nov 24, 2017 |
This is not a book for someone who does not read poetry, believes s/he does not "get" poetry, or otherwise wants an introduction to help them fill the need to get a better great in Lit class. This is a thoughtful and passionate critical essay that ranges over centuries of conundrum: Why have so many for millennia spoken of their hate for poetry?

Along the way, Lerner provides brief and cogent explications of some poems. He clearly is careful and loving reader of poems. I Loved it when he said that Keats' poems failed to send him into trances or transports. And I agree that Dickinson's discords sing to me more than Keats's chords.

Ben Lerner loves poetry so much that he hates it. His explanation is a very Platonic one, that there is a sphere of ideal poems and that all earthbound ones are pale shadows. The gap between drives us to desire more from the individual poem we read than it can deliver and so the desire turns love of "Poetry" to hate of the particular poem.

I have defined poetry as "saying in words that which cannot be said in words---which means that every poem is a failure." That seems different from seeking a perfect poem and failing in that way. Seeking to say or sing the ineffable is by definition impossible. And I guess I have more of a Buddhist view of the music of perfect silence. The poem as koan is fine with me--a beautiful failure that means by failing to embody the meaning.

Enough of that---reading this little book was like listening to a fascinating friend tell a story by the fire. Definitely worth reading for haters and for lovers. ( )
  dasam | Jul 25, 2017 |
A new iteration of an old argument. I kept tripping over the hometown Topeka references. The Hypermart! My library! Gage 4! I happened to be reading the memoir _Places Left Unfinished at the Time of Creation_ in the same week, and read this:

"One elder poet I wrote to, Laura (Riding) Jackson, whose strange abstract poems had made an impression on me, sent back a ten-page, single-spaced, manually typed letter angrily explaining to me that she had renounced poetry in 1939 for its failure to communicate what she called 'the basic human truth', and she cautioned me sternly, lest I fall into the same error in which she had misspent her youth, of believing in the 'truth of poetry'. Inevitably, she said, poetry was more concerned with artifice and elegance of language than with truth. She hadn't failed poetry, she insisted to me in a later letter. Poetry itself had failed."

So there you have it. There is one memoir bit that stood out to me as not at all being possible, a slip or fabrication of some sort, but the rest rings true. ( )
  kcshankd | Apr 24, 2017 |
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Stingl, NikolausTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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In ninth grade English, Mrs. X required us to memorize and recite a poem, so I went and asked the Topeka High librarian to direct me to the shortest poem she knew, and she suggested Marianne Moore's "Poetry," which, in the 1967 version reads in its entirety:
I, too, dislike it.
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"No art has been denounced as often as poetry. It's even bemoaned by poets: "I, too, dislike it," wrote Marianne Moore. "Many more people agree they hate poetry," Ben Lerner writes, "than can agree what poetry is. I, too, dislike it and have largely organized my life around it and do not experience that as a contradiction because poetry and the hatred of poetry are inextricable in ways it is my purpose to explore."In this inventive and lucid essay, Lerner takes the hatred of poetry as the starting point of his defense of the art. He examines poetry's greatest haters (beginning with Plato's famous claim that an ideal city had no place for poets, who would only corrupt and mislead the young) and both its greatest and worst practitioners, providing inspired close readings of Keats, Dickinson, McGonagall, Whitman, and others. Throughout, he attempts to explain the noble failure at the heart of every truly great and truly horrible poem: the impulse to launch the experience of an individual into a timeless communal existence. In The Hatred of Poetry, Lerner has crafted an entertaining, personal, and entirely original examination of a vocation no less essential for being impossible"-- "The novelist and poet Ben Lerner argues that our hatred of poetry is ultimately a sign of its nagging relevance"--

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