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Thin Air

de Richard K. Morgan

Outros autores: Veja a seção outros autores.

Séries: Hakan Veil (1)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
2681577,513 (3.77)3
"From the moment Richard K. Morgan's dazzling debut, Altered Carbon, burst onto the scene, it was clear that a distinctive new voice had arrived to shake up science fiction. His subsequent novels--including the sequels Broken Angels and Woken Furies--confirmed him as a master of hard-boiled futuristic thrillers. Now Morgan returns to the world of SF noir with a riveting tale of crime, corruption, and deadly crisis on a planet teetering close to the edge. On a Mars where ruthless commercial interests violently collide with a homegrown independence movement, as Earth-based overlords battle for profits and power, Hakan Veil is an ex-corporate enforcer equipped with military-grade body tech that's made him a human killing machine. But he's had enough of the turbulent red planet, and all he wants is a ticket back home--which is just what he's offered by the Earth Oversight organization, in exchange for being the bodyguard for an EO investigator. It's a beyond-easy gig for a heavy hitter like Veil . . . until it isn't. When Veil's charge, Madison Madekwe, starts looking into the mysterious disappearance of a lottery winner, she stirs up a hornets' nest of intrigue and murder. And the deeper Veil is drawn into the dangerous game being played, the more long-buried secrets claw their way to the Martian surface. Now it's the expert assassin on the wrong end of a lethal weapon--as Veil stands targeted by powerful enemies hellbent on taking him down, by any means necessary"--… (mais)
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Mostrando 1-5 de 15 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
So, I'm starting with three stars. Let's see if I can convince myself to push it up to four.

Way back when I picked up my first Morgan book, [b:Altered Carbon|40792913|Altered Carbon (Takeshi Kovacs, #1)|Richard K. Morgan|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1531415180l/40792913._SY75_.jpg|2095852], I dug it on a few levels: The hard SF approach. The military-style action. The unflinching violence. The noir-ish atmosphere. Jimi Hendrix. All of it clicked together nicely and worked really well.

While I am possibly one of the least prudish people going, I will say the "Dear Penthouse" explicit sex did seem a touch over the top, but whatever. I'm surprised no one's ripped him for it all being firmly hetero sex.

Regardless, I read Carbon and I loved it. The next two books in that series (trilogy?) mostly threw out the noir/PI angle and I believed they suffered mightily for it.

So when I started this one and realized Morgan had found another fresh angle back into the feel of Carbon without completely aping it, I was happy, and to be honest, all of the elements noted above (with the exception of Hendrix) were all back. Yes, even the over the top "Dear Penthouse" sex.

Along with that, Morgan gives us a twisty-turny plot that the reader can really sink their teeth into. So all of this is to the good.

I'd say the only things that bothered me were that it seemed any system Veil needed to get past was shockingly easily hacked by his onboard system...and literally done in a second. Surely one of the security systems on the transports, the buildings, the weapons...somewhere along the line, one of them would prove a touch more robust than "Ris, hack this motherfucker." "Done."

The other, and the bigger issue, was that, while overall, the book was really well done, with above-average writing for the most part, I felt it overstayed its welcome just a little too long, especially after the climax.

It was good, but not five-star good.

Shit, okay, I just talked myself to up it a star. ( )
  TobinElliott | Sep 3, 2021 |
Do not forsake me, oh my darling ...

Yes, ladies and gentlemen, we are on the High Frontier. Home to noble, if ever so slightly flawed lawmen who have been stripped of badge and six-gun, and exiled to a one-horse town in the middle of nowhere, to pick up light work breaking heads for whoever pays best. Home to canny saloon owners with a hotline to all the local intel, chisel-jawed cattle barons who are determined to fence in the open range, and dance hall girls with hearts of gold. Home to lucrative opportunity, and limitless freedom -- at a price. Ultimate destination for the discarded, society's deluded and the dreamers who have big plans and no legal way to make them happen.

Yes, boys and girls, we are on Mars. Deadwood in space.

Richard K. Morgan unleashes his signature mayhem, and almost balletically choreographed sex and violence, in a classic Western-inspired narrative set on Mars about 300 years* after humanity established its first settlements on the Red Planet. The dream of terraforming, and rendering Mars into Earth II, has been abandoned, but huge areas such as the Mariner Valley and the Hellas impact crater have been encased in a bubble of atmosphere, allowing the development of towns and cities, home-grown industries and organized crime. Mars has been settled long enough that there are second- and third-generation native Martians -- people who have never seen an ocean, and never felt rain, who don't know what a kangaroo is and have perhaps seen a dog once, in the town zoo. But Mars is also the dumping ground for Earth's unwanted masses, a new Botany Bay -- this mix of Mars-born on the make, convict labor, indentured servants, the chancers who have used up most of their nine lives sets up a deadly brew of desperation, resentment, exploitation, and the siren call of one big break.

Because this is Richard K. Morgan, the scene-setting, social construction, and ambient technology is clever and challenging, and feels very real and lived-in -- Morgan's superpower is the ability to not only come up with intriguing future technology, but to think it all through carefully (and sometimes movingly). He works out how that technology affects the society in which it is used, well beyond the point where a lesser author would shrug and say "that'll do"... In a Morgan novel, you see how technology changes people, and how people figure out tweaks to use the technology to their advantage, in ways that the designers never imagined.

Morgan isn't a great believer in exposition, or info-dumps -- which is good, because his worlds are completely immersive experiences from the get-go. But it makes demands on you as a reader, as you try to process complicated personal and political situations, baffling future technology, and throw away references to the history and geography (or should I say areography) of Mars. you could easily read 100 pages or so before you are entirely sure who's doing what to whom, and why ... and what the heck is a "lamina," and a "'branegel," and why is everyone wearing sunglasses all the time? Stick with it, because it's well worth the effort.

I have a couple of relatively minor reservations. I think Morgan stretches it out a little overlong, so that the resolution, when it comes (and oh, yes, it comes ...) feels a bit like anti-climax. As if there has to be some resolution, and it might as well be that. There are several Big Reveals at the end, and I'd sort of seen them all coming. But I have seen a lot of Westerns, thanks to my husband, and I know never, never, ever trust the sweet, upstanding, sexy school-marm type, who rides into town and seems to offer Our Hero a taste of civilization and an escape from his exile. For she is Bad News ...

And I wish someone had talked Morgan out of his infatuation with "interesting" verbs. No one "smears" a smile. No one "gusts" -- they "say." This is especially disappointing because, Morgan really does, otherwise, write so very well.

*300 Martian years = approximately 150 Earth years, btw ... ( )
  maura853 | Jul 11, 2021 |
Well, I'm halfway through this baby, and I have the same things to say about this book that I did for Thirteen by Morgan. I am savoring the read, taking it slow. This one takes place on MARS, so we get the inside/out look at human colonization of the red planet. As with Thirteen, the main character grows on you, and his enhanced violent capabilities are tempered by a moral code of sorts. For the most part, the thrashing he hands out is deserved by the thrashees.

These books along with the Altered Carbon series show Morgan to be the real deal. I wait with much anticipation for further chapters to the Hakan Veil/Mars story line. ( )
  dmwald | May 18, 2021 |
Got half way through. Couldn’t be bothered finishing it. Well written and all that, just missing something. I don’t fucking know. ( )
  mjhunt | Jan 22, 2021 |
Well, The protagonist resembles somewhat that of the Altered Carbon trilogy. The plot follows more or less same logic as its predecessor. There are new ideas of course, but it might as well serve as a prologue to the AC. Fun to read, still. ( )
  hirvela | Dec 27, 2020 |
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Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Richard K. Morganautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
McGrath, ChrisArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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"From the moment Richard K. Morgan's dazzling debut, Altered Carbon, burst onto the scene, it was clear that a distinctive new voice had arrived to shake up science fiction. His subsequent novels--including the sequels Broken Angels and Woken Furies--confirmed him as a master of hard-boiled futuristic thrillers. Now Morgan returns to the world of SF noir with a riveting tale of crime, corruption, and deadly crisis on a planet teetering close to the edge. On a Mars where ruthless commercial interests violently collide with a homegrown independence movement, as Earth-based overlords battle for profits and power, Hakan Veil is an ex-corporate enforcer equipped with military-grade body tech that's made him a human killing machine. But he's had enough of the turbulent red planet, and all he wants is a ticket back home--which is just what he's offered by the Earth Oversight organization, in exchange for being the bodyguard for an EO investigator. It's a beyond-easy gig for a heavy hitter like Veil . . . until it isn't. When Veil's charge, Madison Madekwe, starts looking into the mysterious disappearance of a lottery winner, she stirs up a hornets' nest of intrigue and murder. And the deeper Veil is drawn into the dangerous game being played, the more long-buried secrets claw their way to the Martian surface. Now it's the expert assassin on the wrong end of a lethal weapon--as Veil stands targeted by powerful enemies hellbent on taking him down, by any means necessary"--

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823.92 — Literature English English fiction Modern Period 21st Century

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