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Gilead (2004)

de Marilynne Robinson, Marilynne Robinson

Outros autores: Veja a seção outros autores.

Séries: Gilead (1)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaConversas / Menções
10,842364644 (3.89)1 / 1061
As the Reverend John Ames approaches the hour of his own death, he writes a letter to his son chronicling three previous generations of his family, a story that stretches back to the Civil War and reveals uncomfortable family secrets.
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Grupo TópicoMensagensÚltima Mensagem 
 Someone explain it to me...: Gilead17 por ler / 17Sandydog1, Julho 2014

» Veja também 1061 menções

Inglês (350)  Dinamarquês (2)  Espanhol (2)  Sueco (1)  Holandês (1)  Piratês (1)  Alemão (1)  Japonês (1)  Norueguês (1)  Todos os idiomas (360)
Mostrando 1-5 de 360 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Pastoral, for both the discussions about faith, God, and the Bible, and for its meandering reflective style. With one old man looking back on his life and recording his history so his very young son will have something of his father after the old man's death, the letters go back to the old man's grandfather and father, not fully chronologically, but woven into the old man's reflections of what he observes in the moment and of his own life. Thus the book is almost like four stories woven into one but truly woven, because they merge into one another and are never wholly separate. It's a slow-paced novel, so you need to be in the right mindset, but well written and very reflective. Iowa and Kansas, going back to the early 1900s (and earlier, I believe).
  LDVoorberg | Dec 24, 2023 |
This book has been on my "to be read" list forever. I'd heard it was good, the sort of thing one must read, but that didn't prepare me for the quiet goodness of the book, the way it wormed itself into my mind with the story of a good man, trying to do good things.
In a time when all we seem to see around us is rampant self-interest and greed, it's nice to wallow a little in a well-written narrative about a man who tried to do the right things, based on his creed. It's encouraging. Maybe we humans aren't always so bad after all.
The writing is inviting and I'm looking up more books by this author.
Like a warm cup of tea.... ( )
1 vote Dabble58 | Nov 11, 2023 |
I loved Housekeeping. My dad died when I was young. I grew up Christian, in Iowa, child of Kansans. I thought this would be a slam dunk for me, but maybe I'm too close in, and have spent too much time wondering what my dad would say to me, etc. ( )
  mmparker | Oct 24, 2023 |
What makes this such a beautiful book is that it takes seriously its values of honesty and forthrightness. The appeal of Christianity is the acknowledgement of sin and the imperative to be a better person in the service of others.

John Ames readily admits his flaws, but he is still somewhat idealized by the author. He is writing a text to his young son, to read when his father is dead and when he has grown. It is possible, therefore, that he conceals much, and that this is the nature of his narrative. He can't give everything dark away to posterity.

His struggles with what to conceal and what to reveal are pertinent in regards Jack Boughton, the prodigal son of Ames's best friend, and his namesake. What does it mean to be a Christian towards Jack? Who is most in need of saving? ( )
  jonbrammer | Jul 1, 2023 |
Quiet but persistent, what could certainly bore me to tears kept my attention till the end instead. It took me years to pick up this book, because an old father writing to his son just didn't sound gripping, and he's a pastor at that, so do I really want to hear more preaching? But it's an honest and reflective monologue that delivers humanity beautifully. ( )
  KallieGrace | Jun 8, 2023 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 360 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
But in Gilead, Robinson is addressing the plight of serious people with a calm-eyed reminder of the liberal philosophical and religious traditions of a nation whose small towns "were once the bold ramparts meant to shelter peace", citing a tradition of intellectual discursiveness and a historical cycle that shifts from radical to conservative then back to radical again, and presenting, as if from the point of view of time's own blindness, an era when unthinkable things were happening but were themselves about to change unimaginably, for the better. It takes issue with the status quo by being a message, across generations, from a now outdated status quo. "What have I to leave you but the ruins of old courage, and the lore of old gallantry and hope?"
adicionado por melmore | editarThe Guardian (UK), Ali Smith (Apr 15, 2005)
 
Gradually, Robinson's novel teaches us how to read it, suggests how we might slow down to walk at its own processional pace, and how we might learn to coddle its many fine details. Nowadays, when so many writers are acclaimed as great stylists, it's hard to make anyone notice when you praise a writer's prose. There is, however, something remarkable about the writing in 'Gilead.' It's not just a matter of writing well, although Robinson demonstrates that talent on every page [...] Robinson's words have a spiritual force that's very rare in contemporary fiction -- what Ames means when he refers to 'grace as a sort of ecstatic fire that takes things down to essentials.
adicionado por melmore | editarNew York Times, James Wood (Nov 28, 2004)
 
Marilynne Robinson draws on all of these associations in her new novel, which -- let's say this right now -- is so serenely beautiful, and written in a prose so gravely measured and thoughtful, that one feels touched with grace just to read it. Gilead possesses the quiet ineluctable perfection of Flaubert's "A Simple Heart" as well as the moral and emotional complexity of Robert Frost's deepest poetry. There's nothing flashy in these pages, and yet one regularly pauses to reread sentences, sometimes for their beauty, sometimes for their truth: "Adulthood is a wonderful thing, and brief. You must be sure to enjoy it while it lasts."
adicionado por melmore | editarWashington Post, Michael Dirda (Nov 21, 2004)
 

» Adicionar outros autores (15 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Robinson, Marilynneautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Robinson, Marilynneautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Ebnet, Karl-Heinzautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Kampmann, EvaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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For John and Ellen Summers, my dear father and mother.
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I told you last night that I might be gone sometime, and you said, Where, and I said, To be with the Good Lord, and you said, Why, and I said, Because I'm old, and you said, I don't think you're old.
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This is an interesting planet. It deserves all the attention you can give it (p. 28).
I want your dear perishable self to live long and love this poor perishable world (p.53).
I can't believe we will forget our sorrows altogether. That would mean forgetting that we had lived, humanly speaking. Sorrow seems to me to be a great part of the substance of human life (p. 104).
But if the awkwardness and falseness and failure of religion are interpreted to mean there is no core of truth in it.... the people are disables from trusting their thoughts, their expressions of belief, and their understanding, and even from believing in the essential dignity of their and their neighbors' endlessly flawed experience of belief (p.146).
I conceal my motives from myself pretty effectively sometimes (p. 147).
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Wikipédia em inglês (1)

As the Reverend John Ames approaches the hour of his own death, he writes a letter to his son chronicling three previous generations of his family, a story that stretches back to the Civil War and reveals uncomfortable family secrets.

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